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Acute Gastroenteritis

The Experts below are selected from a list of 303 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Timo Vesikari – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Human bocavirus types 1, 2 and 3 in Acute Gastroenteritis of childhood.
    Acta Paediatrica, 2012
    Co-Authors: Minna Risku, Suvi Lappalainen, Sirpa Rasanen, Minna Kätkä, Timo Vesikari

    Abstract:

    Aim:  Recently identified human bocavirus (HBoV) types 2 and 3 have been associated with Acute Gastroenteritis in children. We studied 878 stool specimens from children with Acute Gastroenteritis and 112 controls (43 children with unspecified fever, 33 with respiratory tract infection and 36 healthy children) for known HBoVs. The same specimens were previously studied for rotaviruses, noroviruses, sapoviruses, adenoviruses, coronaviruses and aichivirus.

    Methods:  HBoVs were detected by PCR and positive amplicons were sequenced to identify HBoV1, HBoV2, HBoV3 and HBoV4.

    Results:  HBoV of any type was found in 85 (9.7%) cases of Acute Gastroenteritis and in 6 (5.4%) controls. HBoV1 was detected in 49 (5.6%) cases and 2 (1.8%) controls, HBoV2 in 29 (3.3%) cases and 2 (1.8%) controls and HBoV3 in 8 (0.9%) cases and 2 (1.8%) controls. No HBoV4 was found. HBoV as a single infection was found in 16 (1.8%) cases and in 6 (5.4%) controls; in the remaining cases, a known Gastroenteritis virus was also found. Among the single HBoV infections, HBoV2 was the most common type with 8 (50%) cases.

    Conclusion:  HBoVs are rarely found alone in children with Acute Gastroenteritis. Further studies are warranted to confirm a possible specific association of HBoV2 with Gastroenteritis.

  • noroviruses as a major cause of Acute Gastroenteritis in children in finland 2009 2010
    Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases, 2011
    Co-Authors: Leena Puustinen, Sirpa Rasanen, Vesna Blazevic, Marjo Salminen, Minna Hamalainen, Timo Vesikari

    Abstract:

    AbstractNoroviruses are, after rotaviruses, the second most common cause of Acute Gastroenteritis in young children. In a prospective study conducted in 2009–2010 at the Tampere University Hospital, 195 stool specimens were collected from cases of Acute Gastroenteritis in children and examined for noroviruses, sapoviruses, and rotaviruses, using a reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Noroviruses were found in 49 (25%) of the cases and sapoviruses in 12 (6%). The norovirus genotype GII.4 dominated with a 76% share; other genotypes detected were GII.7/GII.6 (16%), GII.g/GII.12, GII.e/GII.4, and GII.7 (2% each). For comparison, 47 (24%) cases of rotavirus Gastroenteritis were diagnosed in the same period. In conclusion, after the introduction of rotavirus vaccination in Finland in September 2009, noroviruses have become as common as rotaviruses as the causative agents of Acute Gastroenteritis in young children, and are likely to become the leading cause. Norovirus GII.4 continues to be t…

  • Noroviruses as a major cause of Acute Gastroenteritis in children in Finland, 2009–2010
    Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases, 2011
    Co-Authors: Leena Puustinen, Sirpa Rasanen, Vesna Blazevic, Marjo Salminen, Minna Hamalainen, Timo Vesikari

    Abstract:

    AbstractNoroviruses are, after rotaviruses, the second most common cause of Acute Gastroenteritis in young children. In a prospective study conducted in 2009–2010 at the Tampere University Hospital, 195 stool specimens were collected from cases of Acute Gastroenteritis in children and examined for noroviruses, sapoviruses, and rotaviruses, using a reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Noroviruses were found in 49 (25%) of the cases and sapoviruses in 12 (6%). The norovirus genotype GII.4 dominated with a 76% share; other genotypes detected were GII.7/GII.6 (16%), GII.g/GII.12, GII.e/GII.4, and GII.7 (2% each). For comparison, 47 (24%) cases of rotavirus Gastroenteritis were diagnosed in the same period. In conclusion, after the introduction of rotavirus vaccination in Finland in September 2009, noroviruses have become as common as rotaviruses as the causative agents of Acute Gastroenteritis in young children, and are likely to become the leading cause. Norovirus GII.4 continues to be t…

Hiroshi Ushijima – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Human bocavirus infection in children with Acute Gastroenteritis in Japan and Thailand.
    Journal of Medical Virology, 2010
    Co-Authors: Ngan Thi Kim Pham, Pattara Khamrin, Quang Duy Trinh, Wisoot Chan-it, Shuichi Nishimura, Kumiko Sugita, Niwat Maneekarn, Shoko Okitsu, Masashi Mizuguchi, Hiroshi Ushijima

    Abstract:

    A total of 329 fecal specimens, which had been known to be negative for rotavirus, adenovirus, norovirus, sapovirus, and astrovirus, and which were collected from infants and children with Acute Gastroenteritis in Japan and Thailand during 2005–2008 were screened for human bocavirus (HBoV). HBoV was detected by PCR with a primer pair that amplified the NP1 region of its genome and was genotyped by sequencing of the VP1/VP2 region. Of the 329 samples tested, 6 (1.8%) were positive for HBoV. Of these, five samples were collected from Japan and one sample was from Thailand, and the detection rates of HBoV in each country were 2% and 1.2%, respectively. For the detected HBoV, the capsid VP1/VP2 gene of all HBoV strains was successfully sequenced. Four Japanese HBoV strains studied were clustered into group 1, while the remaining Japanese strain and a unique Thai strain belonged to group 2. No severe Acute Gastroenteritis associated with HBoV was noted. This study provides better understanding on the epidemiology of HBoV infections in children with Acute Gastroenteritis in Japan and Thailand. J. Med. Virol. 83:286–290, 2011. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  • Molecular characterization of rotaviruses, noroviruses, sapovirus, and adenoviruses in patients with Acute Gastroenteritis in Thailand
    Journal of Medical Virology, 2009
    Co-Authors: Leera Kittigul, Kannika Pombubpa, Yuthana Taweekate, Thanapat Yeephoo, Pattara Khamrin, Hiroshi Ushijima

    Abstract:

    Outbreaks of viral Gastroenteritis occur worldwide including Thailand. Unfortunately, there is limited information since etiologic agents have not been identified in several outbreaks of nonbacterial Gastroenteritis. The genotype of enteric viruses causing Acute Gastroenteritis in Thailand was determined using reverse transcriptionmultiplex polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing. From January 2006 to February 2007, stool samples were collected from patients with Acute Gastroenteritis of all age groups attending a hospital in Thailand, and patients with nonbacterial Acute Gastroenteritis (262 patients) were tested for enteric viruses. The overall positive detection rate of enteric viruses was 14.9%; group A rotaviruses (6.1%), noroviruses (6.5%): GI (0.8%) and GII (5.7%), adenoviruses (1.5%), and sapoviruses (0.8%) were found. Group B and C rotaviruses, and astroviruses were not detected in the enrolled patients. Viral Acute Gastroenteritis occurred in children less than 15 years of age (25.2%, 33/131) with higher frequency than in adults (4.6%, 6/131), P-value

  • molecular characterization of rotaviruses noroviruses sapovirus and adenoviruses in patients with Acute Gastroenteritis in thailand
    Journal of Medical Virology, 2009
    Co-Authors: Leera Kittigul, Kannika Pombubpa, Yuthana Taweekate, Thanapat Yeephoo, Pattara Khamrin, Hiroshi Ushijima

    Abstract:

    Outbreaks of viral Gastroenteritis occur worldwide including Thailand. Unfortunately, there is limited information since etiologic agents have not been identified in several outbreaks of nonbacterial Gastroenteritis. The genotype of enteric viruses causing Acute Gastroenteritis in Thailand was determined using reverse transcriptionmultiplex polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing. From January 2006 to February 2007, stool samples were collected from patients with Acute Gastroenteritis of all age groups attending a hospital in Thailand, and patients with nonbacterial Acute Gastroenteritis (262 patients) were tested for enteric viruses. The overall positive detection rate of enteric viruses was 14.9%; group A rotaviruses (6.1%), noroviruses (6.5%): GI (0.8%) and GII (5.7%), adenoviruses (1.5%), and sapoviruses (0.8%) were found. Group B and C rotaviruses, and astroviruses were not detected in the enrolled patients. Viral Acute Gastroenteritis occurred in children less than 15 years of age (25.2%, 33/131) with higher frequency than in adults (4.6%, 6/131), P-value <0.001. Rotavirus G1 was the most predominant genotype, followed by G3, and G9. Among noroviruses, GI-2 was identified; whereas, GII was predominant with a high frequency of GII-4 observed, followed by GII16, GII-2, GII-3, and GII-12. Sapovirus GII-3 and human adenoviruses were identified. This study suggests that enteric viruses play an essential role in patients with Acute Gastroenteritis attending hospital and mainly in children who have a higher prevalence of group A rotaviruses and noroviruses. The genetic analyses provide molecular epidemiological data for viruses important to public health. J. Med. Virol. 81:

Sirpa Rasanen – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Human bocavirus types 1, 2 and 3 in Acute Gastroenteritis of childhood.
    Acta Paediatrica, 2012
    Co-Authors: Minna Risku, Suvi Lappalainen, Sirpa Rasanen, Minna Kätkä, Timo Vesikari

    Abstract:

    Aim:  Recently identified human bocavirus (HBoV) types 2 and 3 have been associated with Acute Gastroenteritis in children. We studied 878 stool specimens from children with Acute Gastroenteritis and 112 controls (43 children with unspecified fever, 33 with respiratory tract infection and 36 healthy children) for known HBoVs. The same specimens were previously studied for rotaviruses, noroviruses, sapoviruses, adenoviruses, coronaviruses and aichivirus.

    Methods:  HBoVs were detected by PCR and positive amplicons were sequenced to identify HBoV1, HBoV2, HBoV3 and HBoV4.

    Results:  HBoV of any type was found in 85 (9.7%) cases of Acute Gastroenteritis and in 6 (5.4%) controls. HBoV1 was detected in 49 (5.6%) cases and 2 (1.8%) controls, HBoV2 in 29 (3.3%) cases and 2 (1.8%) controls and HBoV3 in 8 (0.9%) cases and 2 (1.8%) controls. No HBoV4 was found. HBoV as a single infection was found in 16 (1.8%) cases and in 6 (5.4%) controls; in the remaining cases, a known Gastroenteritis virus was also found. Among the single HBoV infections, HBoV2 was the most common type with 8 (50%) cases.

    Conclusion:  HBoVs are rarely found alone in children with Acute Gastroenteritis. Further studies are warranted to confirm a possible specific association of HBoV2 with Gastroenteritis.

  • noroviruses as a major cause of Acute Gastroenteritis in children in finland 2009 2010
    Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases, 2011
    Co-Authors: Leena Puustinen, Sirpa Rasanen, Vesna Blazevic, Marjo Salminen, Minna Hamalainen, Timo Vesikari

    Abstract:

    AbstractNoroviruses are, after rotaviruses, the second most common cause of Acute Gastroenteritis in young children. In a prospective study conducted in 2009–2010 at the Tampere University Hospital, 195 stool specimens were collected from cases of Acute Gastroenteritis in children and examined for noroviruses, sapoviruses, and rotaviruses, using a reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Noroviruses were found in 49 (25%) of the cases and sapoviruses in 12 (6%). The norovirus genotype GII.4 dominated with a 76% share; other genotypes detected were GII.7/GII.6 (16%), GII.g/GII.12, GII.e/GII.4, and GII.7 (2% each). For comparison, 47 (24%) cases of rotavirus Gastroenteritis were diagnosed in the same period. In conclusion, after the introduction of rotavirus vaccination in Finland in September 2009, noroviruses have become as common as rotaviruses as the causative agents of Acute Gastroenteritis in young children, and are likely to become the leading cause. Norovirus GII.4 continues to be t…

  • Noroviruses as a major cause of Acute Gastroenteritis in children in Finland, 2009–2010
    Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases, 2011
    Co-Authors: Leena Puustinen, Sirpa Rasanen, Vesna Blazevic, Marjo Salminen, Minna Hamalainen, Timo Vesikari

    Abstract:

    AbstractNoroviruses are, after rotaviruses, the second most common cause of Acute Gastroenteritis in young children. In a prospective study conducted in 2009–2010 at the Tampere University Hospital, 195 stool specimens were collected from cases of Acute Gastroenteritis in children and examined for noroviruses, sapoviruses, and rotaviruses, using a reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Noroviruses were found in 49 (25%) of the cases and sapoviruses in 12 (6%). The norovirus genotype GII.4 dominated with a 76% share; other genotypes detected were GII.7/GII.6 (16%), GII.g/GII.12, GII.e/GII.4, and GII.7 (2% each). For comparison, 47 (24%) cases of rotavirus Gastroenteritis were diagnosed in the same period. In conclusion, after the introduction of rotavirus vaccination in Finland in September 2009, noroviruses have become as common as rotaviruses as the causative agents of Acute Gastroenteritis in young children, and are likely to become the leading cause. Norovirus GII.4 continues to be t…