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Vaccination

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Lauri E Markowitz - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • national regional state and selected local area Vaccination coverage among adolescents aged 13 17 years united states 2017
    Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, 2018
    Co-Authors: Tanja Y Walker, Lauri E Markowitz, Laurie D Elamevans, David Yankey, Charnetta L Williams, Sarah A Mbaeyi, Benjamin Fredua, Shannon Stokley
    Abstract:

    : The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommends routine Vaccination of persons aged 11-12 years with human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MenACWY), and tetanus and reduced diphtheria toxoids and acellular pertussis vaccine (Tdap). A booster dose of MenACWY is recommended at age 16 years (1), and catch-up Vaccination is recommended for hepatitis B vaccine (HepB), measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine (MMR), and varicella vaccine (VAR) for adolescents whose childhood Vaccinations are not up to date (UTD) (1). ACIP also recommends that clinicians may administer a serogroup B meningococcal vaccine (MenB) series to adolescents and young adults aged 16-23 years, with a preferred age of 16-18 years (2). To estimate U.S. adolescent Vaccination coverage, CDC analyzed data from the 2017 National Immunization Survey-Teen (NIS-Teen) for 20,949 adolescents aged 13-17 years.* During 2016-2017, coverage increased for ≥1 dose of HPV vaccine (from 60.4% to 65.5%), ≥1 dose of MenACWY (82.2% to 85.1%), and ≥2 doses of MenACWY (39.1% to 44.3%). Coverage with Tdap remained stable at 88.7%. In 2017, 48.6% of adolescents were UTD with the HPV vaccine series (HPV UTD) compared with 43.4% in 2016.† On-time Vaccination (receipt of ≥2 or ≥3 doses of HPV vaccine by age 13 years) also increased. As in 2016, ≥1-dose HPV Vaccination coverage was lower among adolescents living in nonmetropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) (59.3%) than among those living in MSA principal cities (70.1%).§ Although HPV Vaccination initiation remains lower than coverage with MenACWY and Tdap, HPV Vaccination coverage has increased an average of 5.1 percentage points annually since 2013, indicating that continued efforts to target unvaccinated teens and eliminate missed Vaccination opportunities might lead to HPV Vaccination coverage levels comparable to those of other routinely recommended adolescent vaccines.

  • surveillance of Vaccination coverage among adult populations united states 2015
    Morbidity and mortality weekly report. Surveillance summaries (Washington D.C. : 2002), 2017
    Co-Authors: Walter W Williams, Pengjun Lu, Alissa Ohalloran, Tamara Pilishvili, Lauri E Markowitz, Lisa A Grohskopf, Tami H Skoff, Noele P Nelson, Rafael Harpaz, Alfonso Rodriguezlainz
    Abstract:

    PROBLEM/CONDITION: Overall, the prevalence of illness attributable to vaccine-preventable diseases is greater among adults than among children. Adults are recommended to receive Vaccinations based on their age, underlying medical conditions, lifestyle, prior Vaccinations, and other considerations. Updated Vaccination recommendations from CDC are published annually in the U.S. Adult Immunization Schedule. Despite longstanding recommendations for use of many vaccines, Vaccination coverage among U.S. adults is low. PERIOD COVERED: August 2014-June 2015 (for influenza Vaccination) and January-December 2015 (for pneumococcal, tetanus and diphtheria [Td] and tetanus and diphtheria with acellular pertussis [Tdap], hepatitis A, hepatitis B, herpes zoster, and human papillomavirus [HPV] Vaccination). DESCRIPTION OF SYSTEM: The National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) is a continuous, cross-sectional national household survey of the noninstitutionalized U.S. civilian population. In-person interviews are conducted throughout the year in a probability sample of households, and NHIS data are compiled and released annually. The survey objective is to monitor the health of the U.S. population and provide estimates of health indicators, health care use and access, and health-related behaviors. RESULTS: Compared with data from the 2014 NHIS, increases in Vaccination coverage occurred for influenza vaccine among adults aged ≥19 years (a 1.6 percentage point increase compared with the 2013-14 season to 44.8%), pneumococcal vaccine among adults aged 19-64 years at increased risk for pneumococcal disease (a 2.8 percentage point increase to 23.0%), Tdap vaccine among adults aged ≥19 years and adults aged 19-64 years (a 3.1 percentage point and 3.3 percentage point increase to 23.1% and to 24.7%, respectively), herpes zoster vaccine among adults aged ≥60 years and adults aged ≥65 years (a 2.7 percentage point and 3.2 percentage point increase to 30.6% and to 34.2%, respectively), and hepatitis B vaccine among health care personnel (HCP) aged ≥19 years (a 4.1 percentage point increase to 64.7%). Herpes zoster Vaccination coverage in 2015 met the Healthy People 2020 target of 30%. Aside from these modest improvements, Vaccination coverage among adults in 2015 was similar to estimates from 2014. Racial/ethnic differences in coverage persisted for all seven vaccines, with higher coverage generally for whites compared with most other groups. Adults without health insurance reported receipt of influenza vaccine (all age groups), pneumococcal vaccine (adults aged 19-64 years at increased risk), Td vaccine (adults aged ≥19 years, 19-64 years, and 50-64 years), Tdap vaccine (adults aged ≥19 years and 19-64 years), hepatitis A vaccine (adults aged ≥19 years overall and among travelers), hepatitis B vaccine (adults aged ≥19 years, 19-49 years, and among travelers), herpes zoster vaccine (adults aged ≥60 years), and HPV vaccine (males and females aged 19-26 years) less often than those with health insurance. Adults who reported having a usual place for health care generally reported receipt of recommended Vaccinations more often than those who did not have such a place, regardless of whether they had health insurance. Vaccination coverage was higher among adults reporting one or more physician contacts in the past year compared with those who had not visited a physician in the past year, regardless of whether they had health insurance. Even among adults who had health insurance and ≥10 physician contacts within the past year, depending on the vaccine, 18.2%-85.6% reported not having received Vaccinations that were recommended either for all persons or for those with specific indications. Overall, Vaccination coverage among U.S.-born adults was higher than that among foreign-born adults, with few exceptions (influenza Vaccination [adults aged 19-49 years and 50-64 years], hepatitis A Vaccination [adults aged ≥19 years], and hepatitis B Vaccination [adults aged ≥19 years with diabetes or chronic liver conditions]). INTERPRETATION: Coverage for all vaccines for adults remained low but modest gains occurred in Vaccination coverage for influenza (adults aged ≥19 years), pneumococcal (adults aged 19-64 years with increased risk), Tdap (adults aged ≥19 years and adults aged 19-64 years), herpes zoster (adults aged ≥60 years and ≥65 years), and hepatitis B (HCP aged ≥19 years); coverage for other vaccines and groups with Vaccination indications did not improve. The 30% Healthy People 2020 target for herpes zoster Vaccination was met. Racial/ethnic disparities persisted for routinely recommended adult vaccines. Missed opportunities to vaccinate remained. Although having health insurance coverage and a usual place for health care were associated with higher Vaccination coverage, these factors alone were not associated with optimal adult Vaccination coverage. HPV Vaccination coverage for males and females has increased since CDC recommended Vaccination to prevent cancers caused by HPV, but many adolescents and young adults remained unvaccinated. PUBLIC HEALTH ACTIONS: Assessing factors associated with low coverage rates and disparities in Vaccination is important for implementing strategies to improve Vaccination coverage. Evidence-based practices that have been demonstrated to improve Vaccination coverage should be used. These practices include assessment of patients' Vaccination indications by health care providers and routine recommendation and offer of needed vaccines to adults, implementation of reminder-recall systems, use of standing-order programs for Vaccination, and assessment of practice-level Vaccination rates with feedback to staff members. For Vaccination coverage to be improved among those who reported lower coverage rates of recommended adult vaccines, efforts also are needed to identify adults who do not have a regular provider or insurance and who report fewer health care visits.

  • surveillance of Vaccination coverage among adult populations united states 2014
    Morbidity and mortality weekly report. Surveillance summaries (Washington D.C. : 2002), 2016
    Co-Authors: Walter W Williams, Pengjun Lu, Alissa Ohalloran, Tamara Pilishvili, Lauri E Markowitz, Lisa A Grohskopf, Tami H Skoff, Noele P Nelson, Rafael Harpaz, Alfonso Rodriguezlainz
    Abstract:

    PROBLEM/CONDITION: Overall, the prevalence of illness attributable to vaccine-preventable diseases is greater among adults than among children. Adults are recommended to receive Vaccinations based on their age, underlying medical conditions, lifestyle, prior Vaccinations, and other considerations. Updated Vaccination recommendations from CDC are published annually in the U.S. Adult Immunization Schedule. Despite longstanding recommendations for use of many vaccines, Vaccination coverage among U.S. adults is low. REPORTING PERIOD: August 2013-June 2014 (for influenza Vaccination) and January-December 2014 (for pneumococcal, tetanus and diphtheria [Td] and tetanus and diphtheria with acellular pertussis [Tdap], hepatitis A, hepatitis B, herpes zoster, and human papillomavirus [HPV] Vaccination). DESCRIPTION OF SYSTEM: The National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) is a continuous, cross-sectional national household survey of the noninstitutionalized U.S. civilian population. In-person interviews are conducted throughout the year in a probability sample of households, and NHIS data are compiled and released annually. The survey objective is to monitor the health of the U.S. population and provide estimates of health indicators, health care use and access, and health-related behaviors. RESULTS: Compared with data from the 2013 NHIS, increases in Vaccination coverage occurred for Tdap vaccine among adults aged ≥19 years (a 2.9 percentage point increase to 20.1%) and herpes zoster vaccine among adults aged ≥60 years (a 3.6 percentage point increase to 27.9%). Aside from these modest improvements, Vaccination coverage among adults in 2014 was similar to estimates from 2013 (for influenza coverage, similar to the 2012-13 season). Influenza Vaccination coverage among adults aged ≥19 years was 43.2%. Pneumococcal Vaccination coverage among high-risk persons aged 19-64 years was 20.3% and among adults aged ≥65 years was 61.3%. Td Vaccination coverage among adults aged ≥19 years was 62.2%. Hepatitis A Vaccination coverage among adults aged ≥19 years was 9.0%. Hepatitis B Vaccination coverage among adults aged ≥19 years was 24.5%. HPV Vaccination coverage among adults aged 19-26 years was 40.2% for females and 8.2% for males. Racial/ethnic differences in coverage persisted for all seven vaccines, with higher coverage generally for whites compared with most other groups. Adults without health insurance were significantly less likely than those with health insurance to report receipt of influenza vaccine (aged ≥19 years), pneumococcal vaccine (aged 19-64 years with high-risk conditions and aged ≥65 years), Td vaccine (aged ≥19 years), Tdap vaccine (aged ≥19 years and 19-64 years), hepatitis A vaccine (aged ≥19 years overall and among travelers), hepatitis B vaccine (aged ≥19 years, 19-49 years, and 19-59 years with diabetes), herpes zoster vaccine (aged ≥60 years and 60-64 years), and HPV vaccine (females aged 19-26 years and males aged 19-26 years). Adults who reported having a usual place for health care generally were more likely to receive recommended Vaccinations than those who did not have a usual place for health care, regardless of whether they had health insurance. Vaccination coverage was significantly higher among those reporting one or more physician contacts in the past year compared with those who had not visited a physician in the past year, regardless of whether they had health insurance. Even among adults who had health insurance and ≥10 physician contacts within the past year, 23.8%-88.8% reported not having received Vaccinations that were recommended either for all persons or for those with some specific indication. Overall, Vaccination coverage among U.S.-born respondents was significantly higher than that of foreign-born respondents with few exceptions (influenza Vaccination [adults aged 19-49 years], hepatitis A Vaccination [adults aged ≥19 years], hepatitis B Vaccination [adults with diabetes aged ≥60 years], and HPV Vaccination [males aged 19-26 years]). INTERPRETATION: Overall, increases in adult Vaccination coverage are needed. Although modest gains occurred in Tdap Vaccination coverage among adults aged ≥19 years and herpes zoster Vaccination coverage among adults aged ≥60 years, coverage for other vaccines and risk groups did not improve, and racial/ethnic disparities persisted for routinely recommended adult vaccines. Coverage for all vaccines for adults remained low, and missed opportunities to vaccinate adults continued. Although having health insurance coverage and a usual place for health care are associated with higher Vaccination coverage, these factors alone do not assure optimal adult Vaccination coverage. PUBLIC HEALTH ACTIONS: Assessing associations with Vaccination is important for understanding factors that contribute to low coverage rates and to disparities in Vaccination, and for implementing strategies to improve Vaccination coverage. Practices that have been demonstrated to improve Vaccination coverage should be used. These practices include assessment of patients' Vaccination indications by health care providers and routine recommendation and offer of needed vaccines to adults, implementation of reminder-recall systems, use of standing-order programs for Vaccination, and assessment of practice-level Vaccination rates with feedback to staff members. For Vaccination to be improved among those least likely to be up-to-date on recommended adult vaccines, efforts also are needed to identify adults who do not have a regular provider or insurance and who report fewer health care visits.

  • Vaccination coverage among adults excluding influenza Vaccination united states 2013
    Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, 2015
    Co-Authors: Walter W Williams, Pengjun Lu, Alissa Ohalloran, Carolyn B Bridges, Tamara Pilishvili, Craig M Hales, Lauri E Markowitz
    Abstract:

    : Vaccinations are recommended throughout life to prevent vaccine-preventable diseases and their sequelae. Adult Vaccination coverage, however, remains low for most routinely recommended vaccines and below Healthy People 2020 targets. In October 2014, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) approved the adult immunization schedule for 2015. With the exception of influenza Vaccination, which is recommended for all adults each year, other adult Vaccinations are recommended for specific populations based on a person's age, health conditions, behavioral risk factors (e.g., injection drug use), occupation, travel, and other indications. To assess Vaccination coverage among adults aged ≥19 years for selected vaccines, CDC analyzed data from the 2013 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS). This report highlights results of that analysis for pneumococcal, tetanus toxoid-containing (tetanus and diphtheria vaccine [Td] or tetanus and diphtheria with acellular pertussis vaccine [Tdap]), hepatitis A, hepatitis B, herpes zoster (shingles), and human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines by selected characteristics (age, race/ethnicity,† and Vaccination indication). Influenza Vaccination coverage estimates for the 2013-14 influenza season have been published separately. Compared with 2012, only modest increases occurred in Tdap Vaccination among adults aged ≥19 years (a 2.9 percentage point increase to 17.2%), herpes zoster Vaccination among adults aged ≥60 years (a 4.1 percentage point increase to 24.2%), and HPV Vaccination among males aged 19-26 years (a 3.6 percentage point increase to 5.9%); coverage among adults in the United States for the other vaccines did not improve. Racial/ethnic disparities in coverage persisted for all six vaccines and widened for Tdap and herpes zoster Vaccination. Increases in Vaccination coverage are needed to reduce the occurrence of vaccine-preventable diseases among adults. Awareness of the need for vaccines for adults is low among the general population, and adult patients largely rely on health care provider recommendations for Vaccination. The Community Preventive Services Task Force and the National Vaccine Advisory Committee have recommended that health care providers incorporate Vaccination needs assessment, recommendation, and offer of Vaccination into every clinical encounter with adult patients to improve Vaccination rates and to narrow the widening racial/ethnic disparities in Vaccination coverage.

  • noninfluenza Vaccination coverage among adults united states 2012
    Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, 2014
    Co-Authors: Walter W Williams, Pengjun Lu, Alissa Ohalloran, Carolyn B Bridges, Tamara Pilishvili, Craig M Hales, Lauri E Markowitz
    Abstract:

    : Vaccinations are recommended throughout life to prevent vaccine-preventable diseases and their sequelae. Adult Vaccination coverage, however, remains low for most routinely recommended vaccines and well below Healthy People 2020 targets. In October 2013, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) approved the adult immunization schedule for 2014. With the exception of influenza Vaccination, which is recommended for all adults each year, Vaccinations recommended for adults target different populations based on age, health conditions, behavioral risk factors (e.g., injection drug use), occupation, travel, and other indications. To assess Vaccination coverage among adults aged ≥19 years for selected vaccines, CDC analyzed data from the 2012 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS). This report summarizes the results of that analysis for pneumococcal, tetanus toxoid-containing (tetanus and diphtheria vaccine [Td] or tetanus and diphtheria with acellular pertussis vaccine [Tdap]), hepatitis A, hepatitis B, herpes zoster (shingles), and human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines by selected characteristics (age, race/ethnicity, and Vaccination target criteria). Influenza Vaccination coverage estimates for the 2012-13 influenza season have been published separately. Compared with 2011, only modest increases occurred in Tdap Vaccination among adults aged 19-64 years, herpes zoster Vaccination among adults aged ≥60 years, and HPV Vaccination among women aged 19-26 years; coverage among adults in the United States for the other vaccines did not improve. Racial/ethnic gaps in coverage persisted for all six vaccines and widened for Tdap, herpes zoster, and HPV Vaccination. Increases in Vaccination coverage are needed to reduce the occurrence of vaccine-preventable diseases among adults. The Community Preventive Services Task Force and other authorities have recommended that health-care providers incorporate Vaccination needs assessment, recommendation, and offer of Vaccination into routine clinical practice for adult patients.

Walter W Williams - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • surveillance of Vaccination coverage among adult populations united states 2015
    Morbidity and mortality weekly report. Surveillance summaries (Washington D.C. : 2002), 2017
    Co-Authors: Walter W Williams, Pengjun Lu, Alissa Ohalloran, Tamara Pilishvili, Lauri E Markowitz, Lisa A Grohskopf, Tami H Skoff, Noele P Nelson, Rafael Harpaz, Alfonso Rodriguezlainz
    Abstract:

    PROBLEM/CONDITION: Overall, the prevalence of illness attributable to vaccine-preventable diseases is greater among adults than among children. Adults are recommended to receive Vaccinations based on their age, underlying medical conditions, lifestyle, prior Vaccinations, and other considerations. Updated Vaccination recommendations from CDC are published annually in the U.S. Adult Immunization Schedule. Despite longstanding recommendations for use of many vaccines, Vaccination coverage among U.S. adults is low. PERIOD COVERED: August 2014-June 2015 (for influenza Vaccination) and January-December 2015 (for pneumococcal, tetanus and diphtheria [Td] and tetanus and diphtheria with acellular pertussis [Tdap], hepatitis A, hepatitis B, herpes zoster, and human papillomavirus [HPV] Vaccination). DESCRIPTION OF SYSTEM: The National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) is a continuous, cross-sectional national household survey of the noninstitutionalized U.S. civilian population. In-person interviews are conducted throughout the year in a probability sample of households, and NHIS data are compiled and released annually. The survey objective is to monitor the health of the U.S. population and provide estimates of health indicators, health care use and access, and health-related behaviors. RESULTS: Compared with data from the 2014 NHIS, increases in Vaccination coverage occurred for influenza vaccine among adults aged ≥19 years (a 1.6 percentage point increase compared with the 2013-14 season to 44.8%), pneumococcal vaccine among adults aged 19-64 years at increased risk for pneumococcal disease (a 2.8 percentage point increase to 23.0%), Tdap vaccine among adults aged ≥19 years and adults aged 19-64 years (a 3.1 percentage point and 3.3 percentage point increase to 23.1% and to 24.7%, respectively), herpes zoster vaccine among adults aged ≥60 years and adults aged ≥65 years (a 2.7 percentage point and 3.2 percentage point increase to 30.6% and to 34.2%, respectively), and hepatitis B vaccine among health care personnel (HCP) aged ≥19 years (a 4.1 percentage point increase to 64.7%). Herpes zoster Vaccination coverage in 2015 met the Healthy People 2020 target of 30%. Aside from these modest improvements, Vaccination coverage among adults in 2015 was similar to estimates from 2014. Racial/ethnic differences in coverage persisted for all seven vaccines, with higher coverage generally for whites compared with most other groups. Adults without health insurance reported receipt of influenza vaccine (all age groups), pneumococcal vaccine (adults aged 19-64 years at increased risk), Td vaccine (adults aged ≥19 years, 19-64 years, and 50-64 years), Tdap vaccine (adults aged ≥19 years and 19-64 years), hepatitis A vaccine (adults aged ≥19 years overall and among travelers), hepatitis B vaccine (adults aged ≥19 years, 19-49 years, and among travelers), herpes zoster vaccine (adults aged ≥60 years), and HPV vaccine (males and females aged 19-26 years) less often than those with health insurance. Adults who reported having a usual place for health care generally reported receipt of recommended Vaccinations more often than those who did not have such a place, regardless of whether they had health insurance. Vaccination coverage was higher among adults reporting one or more physician contacts in the past year compared with those who had not visited a physician in the past year, regardless of whether they had health insurance. Even among adults who had health insurance and ≥10 physician contacts within the past year, depending on the vaccine, 18.2%-85.6% reported not having received Vaccinations that were recommended either for all persons or for those with specific indications. Overall, Vaccination coverage among U.S.-born adults was higher than that among foreign-born adults, with few exceptions (influenza Vaccination [adults aged 19-49 years and 50-64 years], hepatitis A Vaccination [adults aged ≥19 years], and hepatitis B Vaccination [adults aged ≥19 years with diabetes or chronic liver conditions]). INTERPRETATION: Coverage for all vaccines for adults remained low but modest gains occurred in Vaccination coverage for influenza (adults aged ≥19 years), pneumococcal (adults aged 19-64 years with increased risk), Tdap (adults aged ≥19 years and adults aged 19-64 years), herpes zoster (adults aged ≥60 years and ≥65 years), and hepatitis B (HCP aged ≥19 years); coverage for other vaccines and groups with Vaccination indications did not improve. The 30% Healthy People 2020 target for herpes zoster Vaccination was met. Racial/ethnic disparities persisted for routinely recommended adult vaccines. Missed opportunities to vaccinate remained. Although having health insurance coverage and a usual place for health care were associated with higher Vaccination coverage, these factors alone were not associated with optimal adult Vaccination coverage. HPV Vaccination coverage for males and females has increased since CDC recommended Vaccination to prevent cancers caused by HPV, but many adolescents and young adults remained unvaccinated. PUBLIC HEALTH ACTIONS: Assessing factors associated with low coverage rates and disparities in Vaccination is important for implementing strategies to improve Vaccination coverage. Evidence-based practices that have been demonstrated to improve Vaccination coverage should be used. These practices include assessment of patients' Vaccination indications by health care providers and routine recommendation and offer of needed vaccines to adults, implementation of reminder-recall systems, use of standing-order programs for Vaccination, and assessment of practice-level Vaccination rates with feedback to staff members. For Vaccination coverage to be improved among those who reported lower coverage rates of recommended adult vaccines, efforts also are needed to identify adults who do not have a regular provider or insurance and who report fewer health care visits.

  • surveillance of Vaccination coverage among adult populations united states 2014
    Morbidity and mortality weekly report. Surveillance summaries (Washington D.C. : 2002), 2016
    Co-Authors: Walter W Williams, Pengjun Lu, Alissa Ohalloran, Tamara Pilishvili, Lauri E Markowitz, Lisa A Grohskopf, Tami H Skoff, Noele P Nelson, Rafael Harpaz, Alfonso Rodriguezlainz
    Abstract:

    PROBLEM/CONDITION: Overall, the prevalence of illness attributable to vaccine-preventable diseases is greater among adults than among children. Adults are recommended to receive Vaccinations based on their age, underlying medical conditions, lifestyle, prior Vaccinations, and other considerations. Updated Vaccination recommendations from CDC are published annually in the U.S. Adult Immunization Schedule. Despite longstanding recommendations for use of many vaccines, Vaccination coverage among U.S. adults is low. REPORTING PERIOD: August 2013-June 2014 (for influenza Vaccination) and January-December 2014 (for pneumococcal, tetanus and diphtheria [Td] and tetanus and diphtheria with acellular pertussis [Tdap], hepatitis A, hepatitis B, herpes zoster, and human papillomavirus [HPV] Vaccination). DESCRIPTION OF SYSTEM: The National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) is a continuous, cross-sectional national household survey of the noninstitutionalized U.S. civilian population. In-person interviews are conducted throughout the year in a probability sample of households, and NHIS data are compiled and released annually. The survey objective is to monitor the health of the U.S. population and provide estimates of health indicators, health care use and access, and health-related behaviors. RESULTS: Compared with data from the 2013 NHIS, increases in Vaccination coverage occurred for Tdap vaccine among adults aged ≥19 years (a 2.9 percentage point increase to 20.1%) and herpes zoster vaccine among adults aged ≥60 years (a 3.6 percentage point increase to 27.9%). Aside from these modest improvements, Vaccination coverage among adults in 2014 was similar to estimates from 2013 (for influenza coverage, similar to the 2012-13 season). Influenza Vaccination coverage among adults aged ≥19 years was 43.2%. Pneumococcal Vaccination coverage among high-risk persons aged 19-64 years was 20.3% and among adults aged ≥65 years was 61.3%. Td Vaccination coverage among adults aged ≥19 years was 62.2%. Hepatitis A Vaccination coverage among adults aged ≥19 years was 9.0%. Hepatitis B Vaccination coverage among adults aged ≥19 years was 24.5%. HPV Vaccination coverage among adults aged 19-26 years was 40.2% for females and 8.2% for males. Racial/ethnic differences in coverage persisted for all seven vaccines, with higher coverage generally for whites compared with most other groups. Adults without health insurance were significantly less likely than those with health insurance to report receipt of influenza vaccine (aged ≥19 years), pneumococcal vaccine (aged 19-64 years with high-risk conditions and aged ≥65 years), Td vaccine (aged ≥19 years), Tdap vaccine (aged ≥19 years and 19-64 years), hepatitis A vaccine (aged ≥19 years overall and among travelers), hepatitis B vaccine (aged ≥19 years, 19-49 years, and 19-59 years with diabetes), herpes zoster vaccine (aged ≥60 years and 60-64 years), and HPV vaccine (females aged 19-26 years and males aged 19-26 years). Adults who reported having a usual place for health care generally were more likely to receive recommended Vaccinations than those who did not have a usual place for health care, regardless of whether they had health insurance. Vaccination coverage was significantly higher among those reporting one or more physician contacts in the past year compared with those who had not visited a physician in the past year, regardless of whether they had health insurance. Even among adults who had health insurance and ≥10 physician contacts within the past year, 23.8%-88.8% reported not having received Vaccinations that were recommended either for all persons or for those with some specific indication. Overall, Vaccination coverage among U.S.-born respondents was significantly higher than that of foreign-born respondents with few exceptions (influenza Vaccination [adults aged 19-49 years], hepatitis A Vaccination [adults aged ≥19 years], hepatitis B Vaccination [adults with diabetes aged ≥60 years], and HPV Vaccination [males aged 19-26 years]). INTERPRETATION: Overall, increases in adult Vaccination coverage are needed. Although modest gains occurred in Tdap Vaccination coverage among adults aged ≥19 years and herpes zoster Vaccination coverage among adults aged ≥60 years, coverage for other vaccines and risk groups did not improve, and racial/ethnic disparities persisted for routinely recommended adult vaccines. Coverage for all vaccines for adults remained low, and missed opportunities to vaccinate adults continued. Although having health insurance coverage and a usual place for health care are associated with higher Vaccination coverage, these factors alone do not assure optimal adult Vaccination coverage. PUBLIC HEALTH ACTIONS: Assessing associations with Vaccination is important for understanding factors that contribute to low coverage rates and to disparities in Vaccination, and for implementing strategies to improve Vaccination coverage. Practices that have been demonstrated to improve Vaccination coverage should be used. These practices include assessment of patients' Vaccination indications by health care providers and routine recommendation and offer of needed vaccines to adults, implementation of reminder-recall systems, use of standing-order programs for Vaccination, and assessment of practice-level Vaccination rates with feedback to staff members. For Vaccination to be improved among those least likely to be up-to-date on recommended adult vaccines, efforts also are needed to identify adults who do not have a regular provider or insurance and who report fewer health care visits.

  • Vaccination coverage among adults excluding influenza Vaccination united states 2013
    Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, 2015
    Co-Authors: Walter W Williams, Pengjun Lu, Alissa Ohalloran, Carolyn B Bridges, Tamara Pilishvili, Craig M Hales, Lauri E Markowitz
    Abstract:

    : Vaccinations are recommended throughout life to prevent vaccine-preventable diseases and their sequelae. Adult Vaccination coverage, however, remains low for most routinely recommended vaccines and below Healthy People 2020 targets. In October 2014, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) approved the adult immunization schedule for 2015. With the exception of influenza Vaccination, which is recommended for all adults each year, other adult Vaccinations are recommended for specific populations based on a person's age, health conditions, behavioral risk factors (e.g., injection drug use), occupation, travel, and other indications. To assess Vaccination coverage among adults aged ≥19 years for selected vaccines, CDC analyzed data from the 2013 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS). This report highlights results of that analysis for pneumococcal, tetanus toxoid-containing (tetanus and diphtheria vaccine [Td] or tetanus and diphtheria with acellular pertussis vaccine [Tdap]), hepatitis A, hepatitis B, herpes zoster (shingles), and human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines by selected characteristics (age, race/ethnicity,† and Vaccination indication). Influenza Vaccination coverage estimates for the 2013-14 influenza season have been published separately. Compared with 2012, only modest increases occurred in Tdap Vaccination among adults aged ≥19 years (a 2.9 percentage point increase to 17.2%), herpes zoster Vaccination among adults aged ≥60 years (a 4.1 percentage point increase to 24.2%), and HPV Vaccination among males aged 19-26 years (a 3.6 percentage point increase to 5.9%); coverage among adults in the United States for the other vaccines did not improve. Racial/ethnic disparities in coverage persisted for all six vaccines and widened for Tdap and herpes zoster Vaccination. Increases in Vaccination coverage are needed to reduce the occurrence of vaccine-preventable diseases among adults. Awareness of the need for vaccines for adults is low among the general population, and adult patients largely rely on health care provider recommendations for Vaccination. The Community Preventive Services Task Force and the National Vaccine Advisory Committee have recommended that health care providers incorporate Vaccination needs assessment, recommendation, and offer of Vaccination into every clinical encounter with adult patients to improve Vaccination rates and to narrow the widening racial/ethnic disparities in Vaccination coverage.

  • noninfluenza Vaccination coverage among adults united states 2012
    Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, 2014
    Co-Authors: Walter W Williams, Pengjun Lu, Alissa Ohalloran, Carolyn B Bridges, Tamara Pilishvili, Craig M Hales, Lauri E Markowitz
    Abstract:

    : Vaccinations are recommended throughout life to prevent vaccine-preventable diseases and their sequelae. Adult Vaccination coverage, however, remains low for most routinely recommended vaccines and well below Healthy People 2020 targets. In October 2013, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) approved the adult immunization schedule for 2014. With the exception of influenza Vaccination, which is recommended for all adults each year, Vaccinations recommended for adults target different populations based on age, health conditions, behavioral risk factors (e.g., injection drug use), occupation, travel, and other indications. To assess Vaccination coverage among adults aged ≥19 years for selected vaccines, CDC analyzed data from the 2012 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS). This report summarizes the results of that analysis for pneumococcal, tetanus toxoid-containing (tetanus and diphtheria vaccine [Td] or tetanus and diphtheria with acellular pertussis vaccine [Tdap]), hepatitis A, hepatitis B, herpes zoster (shingles), and human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines by selected characteristics (age, race/ethnicity, and Vaccination target criteria). Influenza Vaccination coverage estimates for the 2012-13 influenza season have been published separately. Compared with 2011, only modest increases occurred in Tdap Vaccination among adults aged 19-64 years, herpes zoster Vaccination among adults aged ≥60 years, and HPV Vaccination among women aged 19-26 years; coverage among adults in the United States for the other vaccines did not improve. Racial/ethnic gaps in coverage persisted for all six vaccines and widened for Tdap, herpes zoster, and HPV Vaccination. Increases in Vaccination coverage are needed to reduce the occurrence of vaccine-preventable diseases among adults. The Community Preventive Services Task Force and other authorities have recommended that health-care providers incorporate Vaccination needs assessment, recommendation, and offer of Vaccination into routine clinical practice for adult patients.

Laurel J Gershwin - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • effects of dual Vaccination for bovine respiratory syncytial virus and haemophilus somnus on immune responses
    Vaccine, 2006
    Co-Authors: Londa J Berghaus, L B Corbeil, Roy D Berghaus, Warren V Kalina, Richard A Kimball, Laurel J Gershwin
    Abstract:

    Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) and Haemophilus somnus (H. somnus) co-infect to form a polymicrobial respiratory disease in calves. Both BRSV and H. somnus Vaccinations have independently been shown to sometimes induce adverse IgE mediated responses. We hypothesized that combining these disease agents in Vaccination would induce cytokine shifts resulting in greater IgE production and enhanced disease. Concurrent Vaccination with subsequent infection with one or both pathogens in calves was conducted to evaluate the isotypic antibody responses, disease severity and cytokine response. BRSV-specific serum IgE levels were elevated for the most clinically diseased calves, while no difference was detected in the IgE levels to H. somnus among groups. The IFN-γ message and H. somnus-specific IgG2 antibodies were significantly elevated in calves with the lowest clinical scores. Vaccination preferentially stimulated higher levels of IgG1 antibodies to BRSV, but in contrast higher levels of IgG2 antibodies to H. somnus. Concurrent Vaccination induced IgE antibodies to BRSV, which were directly correlated with disease severity whereas vaccine induced IgG2 antibodies to H. somnus were inversely correlated with disease severity.

John F Brundage - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • comprehensive systematic surveillance for adverse effects of anthrax vaccine adsorbed us armed forces 1998 2000
    Vaccine, 2003
    Co-Authors: Jeffrey L Lange, Sandra E Lesikar, Mark V Rubertone, John F Brundage
    Abstract:

    Routine Vaccinations of US military personnel with Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed began in 1998. To systematically identify clinical diagnoses reported more frequently after Vaccination than before, all military personnel were retrospectively assigned to pre- or post-Vaccination cohorts. Cohort assignments were based on Vaccination statuses each day of the 3-year surveillance period. For each cohort, rates of hospitalizations and ambulatory visits for 843 specific diagnoses were calculated using data in a public health surveillance system. Compared to the pre-Vaccination cohort, the post-Vaccination cohort had statistically higher rates of hospitalizations for 17 diagnoses, of ambulatory visit s for 34 diagnoses, and in both clinical settings for one diagnosis (malaria). After accounting for systematic differences in coding/reporting and residual confounding, the number and nature of clinical diagnoses more frequent after anthrax Vaccination than before were consistent with expectations due to random variation. This surveillance suggests that Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed has few, if any, clinically significant adverse effects. © 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

L B Corbeil - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • effects of dual Vaccination for bovine respiratory syncytial virus and haemophilus somnus on immune responses
    Vaccine, 2006
    Co-Authors: Londa J Berghaus, L B Corbeil, Roy D Berghaus, Warren V Kalina, Richard A Kimball, Laurel J Gershwin
    Abstract:

    Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) and Haemophilus somnus (H. somnus) co-infect to form a polymicrobial respiratory disease in calves. Both BRSV and H. somnus Vaccinations have independently been shown to sometimes induce adverse IgE mediated responses. We hypothesized that combining these disease agents in Vaccination would induce cytokine shifts resulting in greater IgE production and enhanced disease. Concurrent Vaccination with subsequent infection with one or both pathogens in calves was conducted to evaluate the isotypic antibody responses, disease severity and cytokine response. BRSV-specific serum IgE levels were elevated for the most clinically diseased calves, while no difference was detected in the IgE levels to H. somnus among groups. The IFN-γ message and H. somnus-specific IgG2 antibodies were significantly elevated in calves with the lowest clinical scores. Vaccination preferentially stimulated higher levels of IgG1 antibodies to BRSV, but in contrast higher levels of IgG2 antibodies to H. somnus. Concurrent Vaccination induced IgE antibodies to BRSV, which were directly correlated with disease severity whereas vaccine induced IgG2 antibodies to H. somnus were inversely correlated with disease severity.