ADAM22 - Explore the Science & Experts | ideXlab

Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

ADAM22

The Experts below are selected from a list of 507 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Masaki Fukata – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Human Cerebrospinal Fluid Monoclonal LGI1 Autoantibodies Increase Neuronal Excitability.
    Annals of Neurology, 2020
    Co-Authors: Hans‐christian Kornau, Yuko Fukata, Jakob Kreye, Alexander Stumpf, Daniel Parthier, Rosanna P. Sammons, Barbara Imbrosci, Sarah Kurpjuweit, Alexander B. Kowski, Masaki Fukata

    Abstract:

    OBJECTIVE Leucine-rich glioma-inactivated 1 (LGI1) encephalitis is the second most common antibody-mediated encephalopathy, but insight into the intrathecal B-cell autoimmune response, including clonal relationships, isotype distribution, frequency, and pathogenic effects of single LGI1 antibodies, has remained limited. METHODS We cloned, expressed, and tested antibodies from 90 antibody-secreting cells (ASCs) and B cells from the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of several patients with LGI1 encephalitis. RESULTS Eighty-four percent of the ASCs and 21% of the memory B cells encoded LGI1-reactive antibodies, whereas reactivities to other brain epitopes were rare. All LGI1 antibodies were of IgG1, IgG2, or IgG4 isotype and had undergone affinity maturation. Seven of the overall 26 LGI1 antibodies efficiently blocked the interaction of LGI1 with its receptor ADAM22 in vitro, and their mean LGI1 signal on mouse brain sections was weak compared to the remaining, non-ADAM22-competing antibodies. Nevertheless, both types of LGI1 antibodies increased the intrinsic cellular excitability and glutamatergic synaptic transmission of hippocampal CA3 neurons in slice cultures. INTERPRETATION Our data show that the patients’ intrathecal B-cell autoimmune response is dominated by LGI1 antibodies and that LGI1 antibodies alone are sufficient to promote neuronal excitability, a basis of seizure generation. Fundamental differences in target specificity and antibody hypermutations compared to the CSF autoantibody repertoire in N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis underline the clinical concept that autoimmune encephalitides are very distinct entities. Ann Neurol 2020;87:405-418.

  • the lgi1 ADAM22 protein complex in synaptic transmission and synaptic disorders
    Neuroscience Research, 2017
    Co-Authors: Yuko Fukata, Norihiko Yokoi, Yuri Miyazaki, Masaki Fukata

    Abstract:

    Abstract Physiological functioning of the brain requires fine-tuned synaptic transmission, and its dysfunction causes various brain disorders such as autism, dementia, and epilepsy. It is therefore extremely important to identify and characterize key regulators of synaptic function. In particular, disease-related synaptic proteins, such as autism-related neurexin–neuroligin and psychiatric disorder-related NMDA receptor, have attracted considerable attention. Recent basic and clinical research has highlighted critical roles of a ligand–receptor complex, LGI1–ADAM22, in synaptic transmission and brain function, as mutations in the LGI1 gene cause autosomal dominant lateral temporal lobe epilepsy and autoantibodies to LGI1 cause limbic encephalitis which is characterized by memory loss and seizures. Here, we will review our current knowledge about LGI1 and ADAM22, and discuss their patho-physiological roles in synaptic transmission and synaptic disorders.

  • dysfunctional ADAM22 implicated in progressive encephalopathy with cortical atrophy and epilepsy
    Neurology Genetics, 2016
    Co-Authors: Mikko Muona, Yuko Fukata, Annakaisa Anttonen, Anni Laari, Aarno Palotie, Helena Pihko, Tuula Lonnqvist, Leena Valanne, Mirja Somer, Masaki Fukata

    Abstract:

    Objective: To identify the molecular genetic basis of a syndrome characterized by rapidly progressing cerebral atrophy, intractable seizures, and intellectual disability. Methods: We performed exome sequencing in the proband and whole-genome single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping (copy number variant analysis) in the proband-parent trio. We used heterologous expression systems to study the functional consequences of identified mutations. Results: The search for potentially deleterious recessive or de novo variants yielded compound heterozygous missense (c.1202G>A, p.Cys401Tyr) and frameshift deletion (c.2396delG, p.Ser799IlefsTer96) mutations in ADAM22 , which encodes a postsynaptic receptor for LGI1. The deleterious effect of the mutations was observed in cell surface binding and immunoprecipitation assays, which revealed that both mutant proteins failed to bind to LGI1. Furthermore, immunoprecipitation assays showed that the frameshift mutant ADAM22 also did not bind to the postsynaptic scaffolding protein PSD-95. Conclusions: The mutations identified abolish the LGI1-ADAM22 ligand-receptor complex and are thus a likely primary cause of the proband9s epilepsy syndrome, which is characterized by unusually rapidly progressing cortical atrophy starting at 3–4 months of age. These findings are in line with the implicated role of the LGI1-ADAM22 complex as a key player in nervous system development, specifically in functional maturation of postnatal synapses. Because the frameshift mutation affects an alternatively spliced exon with highest expression in postnatal brain, the combined effect of the mutations is likely to be hypomorphic rather than complete loss of function. This is compatible with the longer survival of the patient compared to Lgi1 −/− and ADAM22 −/− mice, which develop lethal seizures during the first postnatal weeks.

Yuko Fukata – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Human Cerebrospinal Fluid Monoclonal LGI1 Autoantibodies Increase Neuronal Excitability.
    Annals of Neurology, 2020
    Co-Authors: Hans‐christian Kornau, Yuko Fukata, Jakob Kreye, Alexander Stumpf, Daniel Parthier, Rosanna P. Sammons, Barbara Imbrosci, Sarah Kurpjuweit, Alexander B. Kowski, Masaki Fukata

    Abstract:

    OBJECTIVE Leucine-rich glioma-inactivated 1 (LGI1) encephalitis is the second most common antibody-mediated encephalopathy, but insight into the intrathecal B-cell autoimmune response, including clonal relationships, isotype distribution, frequency, and pathogenic effects of single LGI1 antibodies, has remained limited. METHODS We cloned, expressed, and tested antibodies from 90 antibody-secreting cells (ASCs) and B cells from the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of several patients with LGI1 encephalitis. RESULTS Eighty-four percent of the ASCs and 21% of the memory B cells encoded LGI1-reactive antibodies, whereas reactivities to other brain epitopes were rare. All LGI1 antibodies were of IgG1, IgG2, or IgG4 isotype and had undergone affinity maturation. Seven of the overall 26 LGI1 antibodies efficiently blocked the interaction of LGI1 with its receptor ADAM22 in vitro, and their mean LGI1 signal on mouse brain sections was weak compared to the remaining, non-ADAM22-competing antibodies. Nevertheless, both types of LGI1 antibodies increased the intrinsic cellular excitability and glutamatergic synaptic transmission of hippocampal CA3 neurons in slice cultures. INTERPRETATION Our data show that the patients’ intrathecal B-cell autoimmune response is dominated by LGI1 antibodies and that LGI1 antibodies alone are sufficient to promote neuronal excitability, a basis of seizure generation. Fundamental differences in target specificity and antibody hypermutations compared to the CSF autoantibody repertoire in N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis underline the clinical concept that autoimmune encephalitides are very distinct entities. Ann Neurol 2020;87:405-418.

  • the lgi1 ADAM22 protein complex in synaptic transmission and synaptic disorders
    Neuroscience Research, 2017
    Co-Authors: Yuko Fukata, Norihiko Yokoi, Yuri Miyazaki, Masaki Fukata

    Abstract:

    Abstract Physiological functioning of the brain requires fine-tuned synaptic transmission, and its dysfunction causes various brain disorders such as autism, dementia, and epilepsy. It is therefore extremely important to identify and characterize key regulators of synaptic function. In particular, disease-related synaptic proteins, such as autism-related neurexin–neuroligin and psychiatric disorder-related NMDA receptor, have attracted considerable attention. Recent basic and clinical research has highlighted critical roles of a ligand–receptor complex, LGI1–ADAM22, in synaptic transmission and brain function, as mutations in the LGI1 gene cause autosomal dominant lateral temporal lobe epilepsy and autoantibodies to LGI1 cause limbic encephalitis which is characterized by memory loss and seizures. Here, we will review our current knowledge about LGI1 and ADAM22, and discuss their patho-physiological roles in synaptic transmission and synaptic disorders.

  • dysfunctional ADAM22 implicated in progressive encephalopathy with cortical atrophy and epilepsy
    Neurology Genetics, 2016
    Co-Authors: Mikko Muona, Yuko Fukata, Annakaisa Anttonen, Anni Laari, Aarno Palotie, Helena Pihko, Tuula Lonnqvist, Leena Valanne, Mirja Somer, Masaki Fukata

    Abstract:

    Objective: To identify the molecular genetic basis of a syndrome characterized by rapidly progressing cerebral atrophy, intractable seizures, and intellectual disability. Methods: We performed exome sequencing in the proband and whole-genome single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping (copy number variant analysis) in the proband-parent trio. We used heterologous expression systems to study the functional consequences of identified mutations. Results: The search for potentially deleterious recessive or de novo variants yielded compound heterozygous missense (c.1202G>A, p.Cys401Tyr) and frameshift deletion (c.2396delG, p.Ser799IlefsTer96) mutations in ADAM22 , which encodes a postsynaptic receptor for LGI1. The deleterious effect of the mutations was observed in cell surface binding and immunoprecipitation assays, which revealed that both mutant proteins failed to bind to LGI1. Furthermore, immunoprecipitation assays showed that the frameshift mutant ADAM22 also did not bind to the postsynaptic scaffolding protein PSD-95. Conclusions: The mutations identified abolish the LGI1-ADAM22 ligand-receptor complex and are thus a likely primary cause of the proband9s epilepsy syndrome, which is characterized by unusually rapidly progressing cortical atrophy starting at 3–4 months of age. These findings are in line with the implicated role of the LGI1-ADAM22 complex as a key player in nervous system development, specifically in functional maturation of postnatal synapses. Because the frameshift mutation affects an alternatively spliced exon with highest expression in postnatal brain, the combined effect of the mutations is likely to be hypomorphic rather than complete loss of function. This is compatible with the longer survival of the patient compared to Lgi1 −/− and ADAM22 −/− mice, which develop lethal seizures during the first postnatal weeks.

Atsushi Yamagata – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • insights into the mechanisms of epilepsy from structural biology of lgi1 ADAM22
    Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences, 2020
    Co-Authors: Atsushi Yamagata, Shuya Fukai

    Abstract:

    Epilepsy is one of the most common brain disorders, which can be caused by abnormal synaptic transmissions. Many epilepsy-related mutations have been identified in synaptic ion channels, which are main targets for current antiepileptic drugs. One of the novel potential targets for therapy of epilepsy is a class of non-ion channel-type epilepsy-related proteins. The leucine-rich repeat glioma-inactivated protein 1 (LGI1) is a neuronal secreted protein, and has been extensively studied as a product of a causative gene for autosomal dominant lateral temporal lobe epilepsy (ADLTE; also known as autosomal dominant partial epilepsy with auditory features [ADPEAF]). At least 43 mutations of LGI1 have been found in ADLTE families. Additionally, autoantibodies against LGI1 in limbic encephalitis are associated with amnesia, seizures, and cognitive dysfunction. Although the relationship of LGI1 with synaptic transmission and synaptic disorders has been studied genetically, biochemically, and clinically, the structural mechanism of LGI1 remained largely unknown until recently. In this review, we introduce insights into pathogenic mechanisms of LGI1 from recent structural studies on LGI1 and its receptor, ADAM22. We also discuss the mechanism for pathogenesis of autoantibodies against LGI1, and the potential of chemical correctors as novel drugs for epilepsy, with structural aspects of LGI1–ADAM22.

  • Insights into the mechanisms of epilepsy from structural biology of LGI1–ADAM22
    Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences, 2020
    Co-Authors: Atsushi Yamagata, Shuya Fukai

    Abstract:

    Epilepsy is one of the most common brain disorders, which can be caused by abnormal synaptic transmissions. Many epilepsy-related mutations have been identified in synaptic ion channels, which are main targets for current antiepileptic drugs. One of the novel potential targets for therapy of epilepsy is a class of non-ion channel-type epilepsy-related proteins. The leucine-rich repeat glioma-inactivated protein 1 (LGI1) is a neuronal secreted protein, and has been extensively studied as a product of a causative gene for autosomal dominant lateral temporal lobe epilepsy (ADLTE; also known as autosomal dominant partial epilepsy with auditory features [ADPEAF]). At least 43 mutations of LGI1 have been found in ADLTE families. Additionally, autoantibodies against LGI1 in limbic encephalitis are associated with amnesia, seizures, and cognitive dysfunction. Although the relationship of LGI1 with synaptic transmission and synaptic disorders has been studied genetically, biochemically, and clinically, the structural mechanism of LGI1 remained largely unknown until recently. In this review, we introduce insights into pathogenic mechanisms of LGI1 from recent structural studies on LGI1 and its receptor, ADAM22. We also discuss the mechanism for pathogenesis of autoantibodies against LGI1, and the potential of chemical correctors as novel drugs for epilepsy, with structural aspects of LGI1–ADAM22.

  • structural basis of epilepsy related ligand receptor complex lgi1 ADAM22
    Nature Communications, 2018
    Co-Authors: Atsushi Yamagata, Norihiko Yokoi, Yuri Miyazaki, Hideki Shigematsu, Yusuke Sato, Sakurako Gotoito, Asami Maeda, Teppei Goto, Makoto Sanbo, Masumi Hirabayashi

    Abstract:

    Epilepsy is a common brain disorder throughout history. Epilepsy-related ligand–receptor complex, LGI1–ADAM22, regulates synaptic transmission and has emerged as a determinant of brain excitability, as their mutations and acquired LGI1 autoantibodies cause epileptic disorders in human. Here, we report the crystal structure of human LGI1–ADAM22 complex, revealing a 2:2 heterotetrameric assembly. The hydrophobic pocket of the C-terminal epitempin-repeat (EPTP) domain of LGI1 binds to the metalloprotease-like domain of ADAM22. The N-terminal leucine-rich repeat and EPTP domains of LGI1 mediate the intermolecular LGI1–LGI1 interaction. A pathogenic R474Q mutation of LGI1, which does not exceptionally affect either the secretion or the ADAM22 binding, is located in the LGI1–LGI1 interface and disrupts the higher-order assembly of the LGI1–ADAM22 complex in vitro and in a mouse model for familial epilepsy. These studies support the notion that the LGI1–ADAM22 complex functions as the trans-synaptic machinery for precise synaptic transmission. LGI1 is an epilepsy-related gene that encodes a secreted neuronal protein. Here the authors present the crystal structure of LGI1 bound to its receptor ADAM22, which provides structural insights into epilepsy-causing LGI1 mutations and might facilitate the development of novel anti-epilepsy drugs.