Adams Oliver Syndrome - Explore the Science & Experts | ideXlab


Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

Adams Oliver Syndrome

The Experts below are selected from a list of 588 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Adams Oliver Syndrome – Free Register to Access Experts & Abstracts

R. Morger – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Congenital scalp and skull defects with terminal transverse limb anomalies (AdamsOliver Syndrome): Report of three additional cases
    European Journal of Pediatrics, 1990
    Co-Authors: Edgar Jaeggi, Chr. Kind, R. Morger

    Abstract:

    Aplasia cutis congenita of the scalp combined with terminal transverse limb defects (AdamsOliver Syndrome) is a rare congenital disorder with autosomal dominant inheritance. Thirty-one patients with the complete Syndrome have been published. We report three additional patients (one mother and her affected child, one sporadic case) and discuss the probable vascular disruptive pathogenesis, the clinical variability and the treatment of this condition in the light of a comprehensive review of the literature.

    Free Register to Access Article

N Sarioglu – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Autosomal recessive type of AdamsOliver Syndrome: prenatal diagnosis
    Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology, 2002
    Co-Authors: Rolf Becker, Jürgen Kunze, Denise Horn, A. Gasiorek‐wiens, Michael Entezami, R Rossi, M. Guschmann, N Sarioglu

    Abstract:

    We report on three pregnancies complicated by AdamsOliver Syndrome in a consanguineous Turkish couple. Two cases were correctly diagnosed prenatally at 22+3 and 13+0 weeks gestation following the first case of AdamsOliver Syndrome in which severe anomalies of the extremities were observed at 26+5 weeks’ gestation. In this first case, the diagnosis of AdamsOliver Syndrome was made following termination of pregnancy at 27+2 weeks’ gestation. In all three cases, autopsy was performed. All fetuses showed anomalies of the extremities, aplasia cutis and symmetric defects of the skull, with bone being replaced by collagenous tissue. Although there have been numerous cases of the postnatal diagnosis of AdamsOliver Syndrome following termination of pregnancy, this is the first description of the prenatal diagnosis of this disorder.

    Free Register to Access Article

  • autosomal recessive type of Adams Oliver Syndrome prenatal diagnosis
    Ultrasound in Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2002
    Co-Authors: Rolf Becker, Jürgen Kunze, Denise Horn, Michael Entezami, R Rossi, M. Guschmann, A Gasiorekwiens, N Sarioglu

    Abstract:

    We report on three pregnancies complicated by AdamsOliver Syndrome in a consanguineous Turkish couple. Two cases were correctly diagnosed prenatally at 22+3 and 13+0 weeks gestation following the first case of AdamsOliver Syndrome in which severe anomalies of the extremities were observed at 26+5 weeks’ gestation. In this first case, the diagnosis of AdamsOliver Syndrome was made following termination of pregnancy at 27+2 weeks’ gestation. In all three cases, autopsy was performed. All fetuses showed anomalies of the extremities, aplasia cutis and symmetric defects of the skull, with bone being replaced by collagenous tissue. Although there have been numerous cases of the postnatal diagnosis of AdamsOliver Syndrome following termination of pregnancy, this is the first description of the prenatal diagnosis of this disorder.

    Free Register to Access Article

Edgar Jaeggi – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Congenital scalp and skull defects with terminal transverse limb anomalies (AdamsOliver Syndrome): Report of three additional cases
    European Journal of Pediatrics, 1990
    Co-Authors: Edgar Jaeggi, Chr. Kind, R. Morger

    Abstract:

    Aplasia cutis congenita of the scalp combined with terminal transverse limb defects (AdamsOliver Syndrome) is a rare congenital disorder with autosomal dominant inheritance. Thirty-one patients with the complete Syndrome have been published. We report three additional patients (one mother and her affected child, one sporadic case) and discuss the probable vascular disruptive pathogenesis, the clinical variability and the treatment of this condition in the light of a comprehensive review of the literature.

    Free Register to Access Article