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Alain Colige – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • In vivo N-Terminomics Highlights Novel Functions of ADAMTS2 and ADAMTS14 in Skin Collagen Matrix Building
    Frontiers in Molecular Biosciences, 2021
    Co-Authors: Cédric Leduc, Laura Dupont, Alain Colige, Christine Monseur, Loïc Joannes, Dominique Baiwir, Gabriel Mazzucchelli, Christophe Deroanne, Mourad Bekhouche
    Abstract:

    A disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin type I motif (ADAMTS)2 and ADAMTS14 were originally known for their ability to cleave the aminopropeptides of fibrillar collagens. Previous work using N-terminomic approach (N-TAILS) in vitro led to the identification of new substrates, including some molecules involved in TGF-β signaling. Here, N-TAILS was used to investigate the substrates of these two enzymes in vivo, by comparing the N-terminomes of the skin of wild type mice, mice deficient in ADAMTS2, in ADAMTS14 and in both ADAMTS2 and ADAMTS14. This study identified 68 potential extracellular and cell surface proteins, with the majority of them being cleaved by both enzymes. These analyses comfort their role in collagen matrix organization and suggest their implication in inflammatory processes. Regarding fibrillar collcollagen, this study demonstrates that both ADAMTS2 and ADAMTS14 are involved in the processing of the aminopropeptide of alpha1 and alpha2 type V collagen. It also revealed the existence of several cleavage sites in the Col1 domain and in the C-propeptide of type I collagens. In addition to collagens and other extracellular proteins, two major components of the cell cytoskeleton, actin and vimentin, were also identified as potential substrates. The latter data were confirmed in vitro using purified enzymes and could potentially indicate other functions for ADAMTS2 and 14. This original investigation of mouse skin degradomes by N-terminomic highlights the essential role of ADAMTS2 and ADAMTS14 in collagen matrmatrix synthesis and turnover, and gives clues to better understand their functions in skin pathophysiology. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD022179.

  • Purification of Native or Recombinant ADAMTS2, and Procollagen I Cleavage Assay.
    Methods in molecular biology (Clifton N.J.), 2019
    Co-Authors: Alain Colige
    Abstract:

    ADAMTS constitute a family of 19 secreted metalloproteinases involved in diverse physiopathological conditions. Most of their roles first emerged from analysis of spontaneous human and animal mutations or genetically engineered animals. However, the involved mechanisms and the full repertoire of their functions are still largely unrecognized, in part because they are difficult to produce and purify as recombinant active enzymes. Here we describe protocols, tips, and tricks specifically regarding ADAMTS2, 3, and 14 but still relevant for other ADAMTS.

  • differential cleavage of lysyl oxidase by the metalloproteinases bmp1 and ADAMTS2 14 regulates collagen binding through a tyrosine sulfate domain
    Journal of Biological Chemistry, 2019
    Co-Authors: Tamara Rosellgarcia, Laura Dupont, Mourad Bekhouche, Alain Colige, Alberto Paradela, Gema Bravo, Fernando Rodriguezpascual
    Abstract:

    Collagens are the main structural component of the extracellular matrix and provide biomechanical properties to connective tissues. A critical step in collagen fibrfibril formation is the proteolytic removal of N- and C-terminal propeptides from procollagens by metalloproteinases of the ADAMTS (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs) and BMP1 (bone morphogenetic protprotein 1)/Tolloid-like families, respectively. BMP1 also cleaves and activates the lysyl oxidase (LOX) precursor, the enzyme catalyzing the initial step in the formation of covalent collagen cross-links, an essential process for fibril stabilization. In this study, using murine skin fibroblasts and HEK293 cells, along with immunoprecipitation, LOX enzymatic activity, solid-phase binding assays, and proteomics analyses, we report that the LOX precursor is proteolytically processed by the procollagen N-proteinases ADAMTS2 and ADAMTS14 between Asp-218 and Tyr-219, 50 amino acids downstream of the BMP1 cleavage site. We noted that the LOX sequence between the BMP1- and ADAMTS-processing sites contains several conserved tyrosine residues, of which some are post-translationally modified by tyrosine O-sulfation and contribute to binding to collagen. Taken together, these findings unravel an additional level of regulation in the formation of collagen fibrils. They point to a mechanism that controls the binding of LOX to collagen and is based on differential BMP1- and ADAMTS2/14-mediated cleavage of a tyrosine-sulfated domain.

Suneel S. Apte – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • ADAMTS proteins in human disorders.
    Matrix biology : journal of the International Society for Matrix Biology, 2018
    Co-Authors: Timothy J. Mead, Suneel S. Apte
    Abstract:

    ADAMTS proteins are a superfamily of 26 secreted molecules comprising two related, but distinct families. ADAMTS proteases are zinc metalloendopeptidases, most of whose substrates are extracellular matrix (ECM) components, whereas ADAMTS-like proteins lack a metalloprotease domain, reside in the ECM and have regulatory roles vis-a-vis ECM assembly and/or ADAMTS activity. Evolutionary conservation and expansion of ADAMTS proteins in mammals is suggestive of crucial embryologic or physiological roles in humans. Indeed, Mendelian disorders or birth defects resulting from naturally occurring ADAMTS2, ADAMTS3, ADAMTS10, ADAMTS13, ADAMTS17, ADAMTS20, ADAMTSL2 and ADAMTSL4 mutations as well as numerous phenotypes identified in genetically engineered mice have revealed ADAMTS participation in major biological pathways. Important roles have been identified in a few acquired conditions. ADAMTS5 is unequivocally implicated in pathogenesis of osteoarthritis via degradation of aggrecan, a major structural proteoglycan in cartilage. ADAMTS7 is strongly associated with coronary arteartery disease and promotes atherosclerosis. Autoantibodies to ADAMTS13 lead to a platelet coagulopathy, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, which is similar to that resulting from ADAMTS13 mutations. ADAMTS proteins have numerous potential connections to other human disorders that were identified by genome-wide association studies. Here, we review inherited and acquired human disorders in which ADAMTS proteins participate, and discuss progress and prospects in therapeutics.

  • ADAMTS3 activity is mandatory for embryonic lymphangiogenesis and regulates placental angiogenesis
    Angiogenesis, 2016
    Co-Authors: Lauriane Janssen, Suneel S. Apte, Laura Dupont, Mourad Bekhouche, Agnès Noel, Cédric Leduc, Marianne Voz, Bernard Peers, Didier Cataldo, Johanne Dubail
    Abstract:

    The only documented activity of a subclass of ADAMTS proteases comprising ADAMTS2, 3 and 14 is the cleavage of the aminopropeptide of fibrillar procollagens. A limited number of in vitro studies suggested that ADAMTS3 is mainly responsible for procollagen II processing in cartilage. Here, we created an ADAMTS3 knockout mouse (Adamts3^−/−) model to determine in vivo the actual functions of ADAMTS3. Heterozygous Adamts3^+/− mice were viable and fertile, but their intercrosses demonstrated lethality of Adamts3^−/− embryos after 15 days of gestation. Procollagens I, II and III processing was unaffected in these embryos. However, a massive lymphedema caused by the lack of lymphatics development, an abnormal blood vessel structure in the placenta and a progressive liver destruction were observed. These phenotypes are most probably linked to dysregulation of the VEGF-C pathways. This study is the first demonstration that an aminoprocollagen peptidase is crucial for developmental processes independently of its primary role in collagen biology and has physiological functions potentially involved in several human diseases related to angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis.

  • Insights on ADAMTS proteases and ADAMTS-like proteins from mammalian genetics
    Matrix Biology, 2015
    Co-Authors: Johanne Dubail, Suneel S. Apte
    Abstract:

    The mammalian ADAMTS superfamily comprises 19 secreted metalloproteinases and 7 ADAMTS-like proteins, each the product of a distinct gene. Thus far, all appear to be relevant to extracellular matrix function or to cell-matrix interactions. Most ADAMTS functions first emerged from analysis of spontaneous human and animal mutations and genetically engineered animals. The clinical manifestations of Mendelian disorders resulting from mutations in ADAMTS2, ADAMTS10, ADAMTS13, ADAMTS17, ADAMTSL2 and ADAMTSL4 identified essential roles for each gene, but also suggested potential cooperative functions of ADAMTS proteins. These observations were extended by analysis of spontaneous animal mutations, such as in bovine ADAMTS2, canine ADAMTS10, ADAMTS17 and ADAMTSL2 and mouse ADAMTS20. These human and animal disorders are recessive and their manifestations appear to result from a loss-of-function mechanism. Genome-wide analyses have determined an association of some ADAMTS loci such as ADAMTS9 and ADAMTS7, with specific traits and acquired disorders. Analysis of genetically engineered rodent mutations, now achieved for over half the superfamily, has provided novel biological insights and animal models for the respective human genetic disorders and suggested potential candidate genes for related human phenotypes. Engineered mouse mutants have been interbred to generate combinatorial mutants, uncovering cooperative functions of ADAMTS proteins in morphogenesis. Specific genetic models have provided crucial insights on mechanisms of osteoarthritis (OA), a common adult-onset degenerative condition. Engineered mutants will facilitate interpretation of exome variants identified in isolated birth defects and rare genetic conditions, as well as in genome-wide screens for trait and disease associations. Mammalian forward and reverse genetics, together with genome-wide analysis, together constitute a powerful force for revealing the functions of ADAMTS proteins in physiological pathways and health disorders. Their continuing use, together with genome-editing technology and the ability to generate stem cells from mutants, presents numerous opportunities for advancing basic knowledge, human disease pathways and therapy.

Mourad Bekhouche – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • In vivo N-Terminomics Highlights Novel Functions of ADAMTS2 and ADAMTS14 in Skin Collagen Matrix Building
    Frontiers in Molecular Biosciences, 2021
    Co-Authors: Cédric Leduc, Laura Dupont, Alain Colige, Christine Monseur, Loïc Joannes, Dominique Baiwir, Gabriel Mazzucchelli, Christophe Deroanne, Mourad Bekhouche
    Abstract:

    A disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin type I motif (ADAMTS)2 and ADAMTS14 were originally known for their ability to cleave the aminopropeptides of fibrillar collagens. Previous work using N-terminomic approach (N-TAILS) in vitro led to the identification of new substrates, including some molecules involved in TGF-β signaling. Here, N-TAILS was used to investigate the substrates of these two enzymes in vivo, by comparing the N-terminomes of the skin of wild type mice, mice deficient in ADAMTS2, in ADAMTS14 and in both ADAMTS2 and ADAMTS14. This study identified 68 potential extracellular and cell surface proteins, with the majority of them being cleaved by both enzymes. These analyses comfort their role in collagen matrix organization and suggest their implication in inflammatory processes. Regarding fibrillar collagen, this study demonstrates that both ADAMTS2 and ADAMTS14 are involved in the processing of the aminopropeptide of alpha1 and alpha2 type V collagen. It also revealed the existence of several cleavage sites in the Col1 domain and in the C-propeptide of type I collagens. In addition to collagens and other extracellular proteins, two major components of the cell cytoskeleton, actin and vimentin, were also identified as potential substrates. The latter data were confirmed in vitro using purified enzymes and could potentially indicate other functions for ADAMTS2 and 14. This original investigation of mouse skin degradomes by N-terminomic highlights the essential role of ADAMTS2 and ADAMTS14 in collagen matrix synthesis and turnover, and gives clues to better understand their functions in skin pathophysiology. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD022179.

  • differential cleavage of lysyl oxidase by the metalloproteinases bmp1 and ADAMTS2 14 regulates collagen binding through a tyrosine sulfate domain
    Journal of Biological Chemistry, 2019
    Co-Authors: Tamara Rosellgarcia, Laura Dupont, Mourad Bekhouche, Alain Colige, Alberto Paradela, Gema Bravo, Fernando Rodriguezpascual
    Abstract:

    Collagens are the main structural component of the extracellular matrix and provide biomechanical properties to connective tissues. A critical step in collagen fibril formation is the proteolytic removal of N- and C-terminal propeptides from procollagens by metalloproteinases of the ADAMTS (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs) and BMP1 (bone morphogenetic protein 1)/Tolloid-like families, respectively. BMP1 also cleaves and activates the lysyl oxidase (LOX) precursor, the enzyme catalyzing the initial step in the formation of covalent collagen cross-links, an essential process for fibril stabilization. In this study, using murine skin fibroblasts and HEK293 cells, along with immunoprecipitation, LOX enzymatic activity, solid-phase binding assays, and proteomics analyses, we report that the LOX precursor is proteolytically processed by the procollagen N-proteinases ADAMTS2 and ADAMTS14 between Asp-218 and Tyr-219, 50 amino acids downstream of the BMP1 cleavage site. We noted that the LOX sequence between the BMP1- and ADAMTS-processing sites contains several conserved tyrosine residues, of which some are post-translationally modified by tyrosine O-sulfation and contribute to binding to collagen. Taken together, these findings unravel an additional level of regulation in the formation of collagen fibrils. They point to a mechanism that controls the binding of LOX to collagen and is based on differential BMP1- and ADAMTS2/14-mediated cleavage of a tyrosine-sulfated domain.

  • Differential cleavage of lysyl oxidase by the metalloproteinases BMP1 and ADAMTS2/14 regulates collagen binding through a tyrosine sulfate domain.
    The Journal of biological chemistry, 2019
    Co-Authors: Tamara Rosell-garcía, Laura Dupont, Mourad Bekhouche, Alain Colige, Alberto Paradela, Gema Bravo, Fernando Rodríguez-pascual
    Abstract:

    Collagens are the main structural component of the extracellular matrix and provide biomechanical properties to connective tissues. A critical step in collagen fibrfibril formation is the proteolytic removal of N- and C-terminal propeptides from procollagens by metalloproteinases of the ADAMTS (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs) and BMP1 (bone morphogenetic protprotein 1)/Tolloid-like families, respectively. BMP1 also cleaves and activates the lysyl oxidase (LOX) precursor, the enzyme catalyzing the initial step in the formation of covalent collagen cross-links, an essential process for fibril stabilization. In this study, using murine skin fibroblasts and HEK293 cells, along with immunoprecipitation, LOX enzymatic activity, solid-phase binding assays, and proteomics analyses, we report that the LOX precursor is proteolytically processed by the procollagen N-proteinases ADAMTS2 and ADAMTS14 between Asp-218 and Tyr-219, 50 amino acids downstream of the BMP1 cleavage site. We noted that the LOX sequence between the BMP1- and ADAMTS-processing sites contains several conserved tyrosine residues, of which some are post-translationally modified by tyrosine O-sulfation and contribute to binding to collagen. Taken together, these findings unravel an additional level of regulation in the formation of collagen fibrils. They point to a mechanism that controls the binding of LOX to collagen and is based on differential BMP1- and ADAMTS2/14-mediated cleavage of a tyrosine-sulfated domain.

Laura Dupont – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • In vivo N-Terminomics Highlights Novel Functions of ADAMTS2 and ADAMTS14 in Skin Collagen Matrix Building
    Frontiers in Molecular Biosciences, 2021
    Co-Authors: Cédric Leduc, Laura Dupont, Alain Colige, Christine Monseur, Loïc Joannes, Dominique Baiwir, Gabriel Mazzucchelli, Christophe Deroanne, Mourad Bekhouche
    Abstract:

    A disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin type I motif (ADAMTS)2 and ADAMTS14 were originally known for their ability to cleave the aminopropeptides of fibrillar collagens. Previous work using N-terminomic approach (N-TAILS) in vitro led to the identification of new substrates, including some molecules involved in TGF-β signaling. Here, N-TAILS was used to investigate the substrates of these two enzymes in vivo, by comparing the N-terminomes of the skin of wild type mice, mice deficient in ADAMTS2, in ADAMTS14 and in both ADAMTS2 and ADAMTS14. This study identified 68 potential extracellular and cell surface proteins, with the majority of them being cleaved by both enzymes. These analyses comfort their role in collagen matrix organization and suggest their implication in inflammatory processes. Regarding fibrillar collagen, this study demonstrates that both ADAMTS2 and ADAMTS14 are involved in the processing of the aminopropeptide of alpha1 and alpha2 type V collagen. It also revealed the existence of several cleavage sites in the Col1 domain and in the C-propeptide of type I collagens. In addition to collagens and other extracellular proteins, two major components of the cell cytoskeleton, actin and vimentin, were also identified as potential substrates. The latter data were confirmed in vitro using purified enzymes and could potentially indicate other functions for ADAMTS2 and 14. This original investigation of mouse skin degradomes by N-terminomic highlights the essential role of ADAMTS2 and ADAMTS14 in collagen matrix synthesis and turnover, and gives clues to better understand their functions in skin pathophysiology. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD022179.

  • differential cleavage of lysyl oxidase by the metalloproteinases bmp1 and ADAMTS2 14 regulates collagen binding through a tyrosine sulfate domain
    Journal of Biological Chemistry, 2019
    Co-Authors: Tamara Rosellgarcia, Laura Dupont, Mourad Bekhouche, Alain Colige, Alberto Paradela, Gema Bravo, Fernando Rodriguezpascual
    Abstract:

    Collagens are the main structural component of the extracellular matrix and provide biomechanical properties to connective tissues. A critical step in collagen fibril formation is the proteolytic removal of N- and C-terminal propeptides from procollagens by metalloproteinases of the ADAMTS (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs) and BMP1 (bone morphogenetic protein 1)/Tolloid-like families, respectively. BMP1 also cleaves and activates the lysyl oxidase (LOX) precursor, the enzyme catalyzing the initial step in the formation of covalent collagen cross-links, an essential process for fibril stabilization. In this study, using murine skin fibroblasts and HEK293 cells, along with immunoprecipitation, LOX enzymatic activity, solid-phase binding assays, and proteomics analyses, we report that the LOX precursor is proteolytically processed by the procollagen N-proteinases ADAMTS2 and ADAMTS14 between Asp-218 and Tyr-219, 50 amino acids downstream of the BMP1 cleavage site. We noted that the LOX sequence between the BMP1- and ADAMTS-processing sites contains several conserved tyrosine residues, of which some are post-translationally modified by tyrosine O-sulfation and contribute to binding to collagen. Taken together, these findings unravel an additional level of regulation in the formation of collagen fibrils. They point to a mechanism that controls the binding of LOX to collagen and is based on differential BMP1- and ADAMTS2/14-mediated cleavage of a tyrosine-sulfated domain.

  • Differential cleavage of lysyl oxidase by the metalloproteinases BMP1 and ADAMTS2/14 regulates collagen binding through a tyrosine sulfate domain.
    The Journal of biological chemistry, 2019
    Co-Authors: Tamara Rosell-garcía, Laura Dupont, Mourad Bekhouche, Alain Colige, Alberto Paradela, Gema Bravo, Fernando Rodríguez-pascual
    Abstract:

    Collagens are the main structural component of the extracellular matrix and provide biomechanical properties to connective tissues. A critical step in collagen fibril formation is the proteolytic removal of N- and C-terminal propeptides from procollagens by metalloproteinases of the ADAMTS (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs) and BMP1 (bone morphogenetic protein 1)/Tolloid-like families, respectively. BMP1 also cleaves and activates the lysyl oxidase (LOX) precursor, the enzyme catalyzing the initial step in the formation of covalent collagen cross-links, an essential process for fibril stabilization. In this study, using murine skin fibroblasts and HEK293 cells, along with immunoprecipitation, LOX enzymatic activity, solid-phase binding assays, and proteomics analyses, we report that the LOX precursor is proteolytically processed by the procollagen N-proteinases ADAMTS2 and ADAMTS14 between Asp-218 and Tyr-219, 50 amino acids downstream of the BMP1 cleavage site. We noted that the LOX sequence between the BMP1- and ADAMTS-processing sites contains several conserved tyrosine residues, of which some are post-translationally modified by tyrosine O-sulfation and contribute to binding to collagen. Taken together, these findings unravel an additional level of regulation in the formation of collagen fibrils. They point to a mechanism that controls the binding of LOX to collagen and is based on differential BMP1- and ADAMTS2/14-mediated cleavage of a tyrosine-sulfated domain.

Michael P. Clarke – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.