Adapter Pattern - Explore the Science & Experts | ideXlab

Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

Adapter Pattern

The Experts below are selected from a list of 2220 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Adapter Pattern – Free Register to Access Experts & Abstracts

Colin Atkinson – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • the managed Adapter Pattern facilitating glue code generation for component reuse
    International Conference on Software Reuse, 2009
    Co-Authors: Oliver Hummel, Colin Atkinson

    Abstract:

    The Adapter or wrapper Pattern is one of the most widely used Patterns in software engineering since the problem of reconciling unsuitable component interfaces is so ubiquitous. However, the classic Adapter Pattern as described by the Gang of Four has some limitations which rule out its use in certain situations. Of the two forms of the Pattern, only the object Adapter form is usable with common programming languages not supporting multiple inheritance (such as Java or C#), and this is not able to adapt interfaces of classes whose own type is used in one or more of their operations. This makes it impossible for a tool to automatically generate “glue code” for such components and forces developers to come up with some non-trivial (and typically invasive) workarounds to enable clients to use them. In this paper we present an enhanced form of the Adapter Pattern which solves this problem by extending the way in which an Adapter stores and manages adaptees. We therefore call it the Managed Adapter Pattern. After describing the Pattern in the usual Gang of Four-oriented way, we describe its application in the system that initially motivated its development — a test-driven component search engine which is able to retrieve reusable assets based on their semantics. A key challenge in the implementation of this engine was developing a flexible glue code generator that was able to automate the creation of Adapters for all the kinds of components delivered by the underlying component repository.

  • ICSR – The Managed Adapter Pattern: Facilitating Glue Code Generation for Component Reuse
    Formal Foundations of Reuse and Domain Engineering, 2009
    Co-Authors: Oliver Hummel, Colin Atkinson

    Abstract:

    The Adapter or wrapper Pattern is one of the most widely used Patterns in software engineering since the problem of reconciling unsuitable component interfaces is so ubiquitous. However, the classic Adapter Pattern as described by the Gang of Four has some limitations which rule out its use in certain situations. Of the two forms of the Pattern, only the object Adapter form is usable with common programming languages not supporting multiple inheritance (such as Java or C#), and this is not able to adapt interfaces of classes whose own type is used in one or more of their operations. This makes it impossible for a tool to automatically generate “glue code” for such components and forces developers to come up with some non-trivial (and typically invasive) workarounds to enable clients to use them. In this paper we present an enhanced form of the Adapter Pattern which solves this problem by extending the way in which an Adapter stores and manages adaptees. We therefore call it the Managed Adapter Pattern. After describing the Pattern in the usual Gang of Four-oriented way, we describe its application in the system that initially motivated its development — a test-driven component search engine which is able to retrieve reusable assets based on their semantics. A key challenge in the implementation of this engine was developing a flexible glue code generator that was able to automate the creation of Adapters for all the kinds of components delivered by the underlying component repository.

Ping-feng Wang – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • A Framework for Composing SOAP, Non-SOAP and Non-Web Services
    IEEE Transactions on Services Computing, 2015
    Co-Authors: Jonathan Lee, Shin-jie Lee, Ping-feng Wang

    Abstract:

    Recently, there is a trend on developing mobile applications based on service-oriented architecture in numerous application domains, such as telematics and smart home. Although efforts have been made on developing composite SOAP services, little emphasis has been put on invoking and composing a combination of SOAP, non-SOAP, and non-web services into a composite process to execute complex tasks on various mobile devices. Main challenges are two-fold: one is how to invoke and compose heterogeneous web services with various protocols and content types, including SOAP, RESTful, and OSGi services; and the other is how to integrate non-web services, like web contents and mobile applications, into a composite service process. In this work, we propose an approach to invoking and composing SOAP, non-SOAP, and non-web services with two key features: an extended BPEL engine bundled with Adapters to enable direct invocation and composition of SOAP, RESTful and OSGi services based on Adapter Pattern; and two transformation mechanisms devised to enable conversion of web contents and Android activities into OSGi services. In the experimental evaluations, we demonstrate network traffic and turnaround time of our approach are better than those of the traditional ones.

Oliver Hummel – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • the managed Adapter Pattern facilitating glue code generation for component reuse
    International Conference on Software Reuse, 2009
    Co-Authors: Oliver Hummel, Colin Atkinson

    Abstract:

    The Adapter or wrapper Pattern is one of the most widely used Patterns in software engineering since the problem of reconciling unsuitable component interfaces is so ubiquitous. However, the classic Adapter Pattern as described by the Gang of Four has some limitations which rule out its use in certain situations. Of the two forms of the Pattern, only the object Adapter form is usable with common programming languages not supporting multiple inheritance (such as Java or C#), and this is not able to adapt interfaces of classes whose own type is used in one or more of their operations. This makes it impossible for a tool to automatically generate “glue code” for such components and forces developers to come up with some non-trivial (and typically invasive) workarounds to enable clients to use them. In this paper we present an enhanced form of the Adapter Pattern which solves this problem by extending the way in which an Adapter stores and manages adaptees. We therefore call it the Managed Adapter Pattern. After describing the Pattern in the usual Gang of Four-oriented way, we describe its application in the system that initially motivated its development — a test-driven component search engine which is able to retrieve reusable assets based on their semantics. A key challenge in the implementation of this engine was developing a flexible glue code generator that was able to automate the creation of Adapters for all the kinds of components delivered by the underlying component repository.

  • ICSR – The Managed Adapter Pattern: Facilitating Glue Code Generation for Component Reuse
    Formal Foundations of Reuse and Domain Engineering, 2009
    Co-Authors: Oliver Hummel, Colin Atkinson

    Abstract:

    The Adapter or wrapper Pattern is one of the most widely used Patterns in software engineering since the problem of reconciling unsuitable component interfaces is so ubiquitous. However, the classic Adapter Pattern as described by the Gang of Four has some limitations which rule out its use in certain situations. Of the two forms of the Pattern, only the object Adapter form is usable with common programming languages not supporting multiple inheritance (such as Java or C#), and this is not able to adapt interfaces of classes whose own type is used in one or more of their operations. This makes it impossible for a tool to automatically generate “glue code” for such components and forces developers to come up with some non-trivial (and typically invasive) workarounds to enable clients to use them. In this paper we present an enhanced form of the Adapter Pattern which solves this problem by extending the way in which an Adapter stores and manages adaptees. We therefore call it the Managed Adapter Pattern. After describing the Pattern in the usual Gang of Four-oriented way, we describe its application in the system that initially motivated its development — a test-driven component search engine which is able to retrieve reusable assets based on their semantics. A key challenge in the implementation of this engine was developing a flexible glue code generator that was able to automate the creation of Adapters for all the kinds of components delivered by the underlying component repository.