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Adaptive Coping

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Tania M Lincoln – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • dysfunctional Coping with stress in psychosis an investigation with the malAdaptive and Adaptive Coping styles max questionnaire
    Schizophrenia Research, 2016
    Co-Authors: Steffen Moritz, Thies Ludtke, Stefan Westermann, Joy Hermeneit, Jessica Watroba, Tania M Lincoln

    Abstract:

    Abstract Objective Psychotic episodes have long been conceptualized as inevitable incidents triggered by endogenous biological impairments. It is now well-accepted that the ability of an individual to deal with social and environmental challenges plays an important role in regard to whether or not a vulnerability to psychosis translates into symptoms. For the present study, we examined symptomatic correlates of dysfunctional Coping in psychosis and aimed to elucidate a profile of Coping strategies that distinguishes patients with schizophrenia from those with depression. Method The newly devised MalAdaptive and Adaptive Coping Styles Scale (MAX) was administered to 75 individuals with psychosis, 100 individuals with depression and 1100 nonclinical controls. Results Schizophrenia patients showed compromised Coping abilities relative to nonclinical controls, particularly a lack of engaging in Adaptive Coping. Depression was more closely tied to dysfunctional Coping than were positive symptoms as indicated by group comparisons and correlational analyses. Correlations between positive symptoms, particularly paranoid symptoms, and avoidance and suppression remained significant when depression was controlled for. Conclusions Although malAdaptive and Adaptive Coping are unlikely to represent proximal mechanisms for the pathogenesis of positive symptoms, fostering Coping skills may reduce positive symptoms via the improvement of depressive symptoms, which are increasingly regarded as risk factors for core psychotic symptoms. Furthermore, the reduction of avoidance and suppression may directly improve positive symptoms.

  • Dysfunctional Coping with stress in psychosis. An investigation with the MalAdaptive and Adaptive Coping Styles (MAX) questionnaire.
    Schizophrenia research, 2016
    Co-Authors: Steffen Moritz, Thies Ludtke, Stefan Westermann, Joy Hermeneit, Jessica Watroba, Tania M Lincoln

    Abstract:

    Psychotic episodes have long been conceptualized as inevitable incidents triggered by endogenous biological impairments. It is now well-accepted that the ability of an individual to deal with social and environmental challenges plays an important role in regard to whether or not a vulnerability to psychosis translates into symptoms. For the present study, we examined symptomatic correlates of dysfunctional Coping in psychosis and aimed to elucidate a profile of Coping strategies that distinguishes patients with schizophrenia from those with depression.
    The newly devised MalAdaptive and Adaptive Coping Styles Scale (MAX) was administered to 75 individuals with psychosis, 100 individuals with depression and 1100 nonclinical controls.
    Schizophrenia patients showed compromised Coping abilities relative to nonclinical controls, particularly a lack of engaging in Adaptive Coping. Depression was more closely tied to dysfunctional Coping than were positive symptoms as indicated by group comparisons and correlational analyses. Correlations between positive symptoms, particularly paranoid symptoms, and avoidance and suppression remained significant when depression was controlled for.
    Although malAdaptive and Adaptive Coping are unlikely to represent proximal mechanisms for the pathogenesis of positive symptoms, fostering Coping skills may reduce positive symptoms via the improvement of depressive symptoms, which are increasingly regarded as risk factors for core psychotic symptoms. Furthermore, the reduction of avoidance and suppression may directly improve positive symptoms.
    Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  • more Adaptive versus less malAdaptive Coping what is more predictive of symptom severity development of a new scale to investigate Coping profiles across different psychopathological syndromes
    Journal of Affective Disorders, 2016
    Co-Authors: Steffen Moritz, Tania M Lincoln, Anna Katharina Jahns, Johanna Schroder, Thomas Berger, Jan Philipp Klein, Anja S Goritz

    Abstract:

    Abstract Background Lack of Adaptive and enhanced malAdaptive Coping with stress and negative emotions are implicated in many psychopathological disorders. We describe the development of a new scale to investigate the relative contribution of different Coping styles to psychopathology in a large population sample. We hypothesized that the magnitude of the supposed positive correlation between malAdaptive Coping and psychopathology would be stronger than the supposed negative correlation between Adaptive Coping and psychopathology. We also examined whether distinct Coping style patterns emerge for different psychopathological syndromes. Methods A total of 2200 individuals from the general population participated in an online survey. The Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), the Obsessive-Compulsive Inventory revised (OCI-R) and the Paranoia Checklist were administered along with a novel instrument called MalAdaptive and Adaptive Coping Styles (MAX) questionnaire. Participants were reassessed six months later. Results MAX consists of three dimensions representing Adaptive Coping, malAdaptive Coping and avoidance. Across all psychopathological syndromes, similar response patterns emerged. MalAdaptive Coping was more strongly related to psychopathology than Adaptive Coping both cross-sectionally and longitudinally. The overall number of Coping styles adopted by an individual predicted greater psychopathology. Mediation analysis suggests that a mild positive relationship between Adaptive and certain malAdaptive styles (emotional suppression) partially accounts for the attenuated relationship between Adaptive Coping and depressive symptoms. Limitations Results should be replicated in a clinical population. Conclusions Results suggest that malAdaptive and Adaptive Coping styles are not reciprocal. Reducing malAdaptive Coping seems to be more important for outcome than enhancing Adaptive Coping. The study supports transdiagnostic approaches advocating that malAdaptive Coping is a common factor across different psychopathologies.

Steffen Moritz – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • obsessive compulsive disorder is characterized by a lack of Adaptive Coping rather than an excess of malAdaptive Coping
    Cognitive Therapy and Research, 2018
    Co-Authors: Steffen Moritz, J Fink, Franziska Miegel, Katharina Nitsche, Vivien Kraft, Peter Tonn, Lena Jelinek

    Abstract:

    The present study aimed to elucidate the profile of Coping in patients with obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD) in order to discern whether the disorder is characterized by an excess of malAdaptive Coping skills and/or a lack of Adaptive Coping skills. Sixty individuals with OCD were compared with 110 individuals with depression and 1050 nonclinical controls on the MalAdaptive and Adaptive Coping Styles Questionnaire (MAX). Psychopathology was assessed with the Obsessive–Compulsive Inventory-Revised (OCI-R), the Yale-Brown Obsessive–Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS), and the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 for depression (PHQ-9). Individuals with OCD and depression displayed more malAdaptive Coping and avoidance as well as less Adaptive Coping than nonclinical controls. Importantly, Adaptive Coping was significantly lower in individuals with OCD than in those with depression at a medium effect size, whereas the clinical groups were indistinguishable on malAdaptive Coping and avoidance. Lack of Adaptive Coping was strongly correlated with resistance to symptoms and poor insight in OCD (Y-BOCS), even after controlling for depression. Lack of Adaptive Coping skills may represent a specific pathogenetic factor in OCD. Longitudinal studies need to clarify whether strengthening Adaptive skills during childhood and adolescence may help to prevent the progression from subclinical to manifest OCD.

  • Obsessive–Compulsive Disorder is Characterized by a Lack of Adaptive Coping Rather than an Excess of MalAdaptive Coping
    Cognitive Therapy and Research, 2018
    Co-Authors: Steffen Moritz, J Fink, Franziska Miegel, Katharina Nitsche, Vivien Kraft, Peter Tonn, Lena Jelinek

    Abstract:

    The present study aimed to elucidate the profile of Coping in patients with obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD) in order to discern whether the disorder is characterized by an excess of malAdaptive Coping skills and/or a lack of Adaptive Coping skills. Sixty individuals with OCD were compared with 110 individuals with depression and 1050 nonclinical controls on the MalAdaptive and Adaptive Coping Styles Questionnaire (MAX). Psychopathology was assessed with the Obsessive–Compulsive Inventory-Revised (OCI-R), the Yale-Brown Obsessive–Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS), and the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 for depression (PHQ-9). Individuals with OCD and depression displayed more malAdaptive Coping and avoidance as well as less Adaptive Coping than nonclinical controls. Importantly, Adaptive Coping was significantly lower in individuals with OCD than in those with depression at a medium effect size, whereas the clinical groups were indistinguishable on malAdaptive Coping and avoidance. Lack of Adaptive Coping was strongly correlated with resistance to symptoms and poor insight in OCD (Y-BOCS), even after controlling for depression. Lack of Adaptive Coping skills may represent a specific pathogenetic factor in OCD. Longitudinal studies need to clarify whether strengthening Adaptive skills during childhood and adolescence may help to prevent the progression from subclinical to manifest OCD.

  • dysfunctional Coping with stress in psychosis an investigation with the malAdaptive and Adaptive Coping styles max questionnaire
    Schizophrenia Research, 2016
    Co-Authors: Steffen Moritz, Thies Ludtke, Stefan Westermann, Joy Hermeneit, Jessica Watroba, Tania M Lincoln

    Abstract:

    Abstract Objective Psychotic episodes have long been conceptualized as inevitable incidents triggered by endogenous biological impairments. It is now well-accepted that the ability of an individual to deal with social and environmental challenges plays an important role in regard to whether or not a vulnerability to psychosis translates into symptoms. For the present study, we examined symptomatic correlates of dysfunctional Coping in psychosis and aimed to elucidate a profile of Coping strategies that distinguishes patients with schizophrenia from those with depression. Method The newly devised MalAdaptive and Adaptive Coping Styles Scale (MAX) was administered to 75 individuals with psychosis, 100 individuals with depression and 1100 nonclinical controls. Results Schizophrenia patients showed compromised Coping abilities relative to nonclinical controls, particularly a lack of engaging in Adaptive Coping. Depression was more closely tied to dysfunctional Coping than were positive symptoms as indicated by group comparisons and correlational analyses. Correlations between positive symptoms, particularly paranoid symptoms, and avoidance and suppression remained significant when depression was controlled for. Conclusions Although malAdaptive and Adaptive Coping are unlikely to represent proximal mechanisms for the pathogenesis of positive symptoms, fostering Coping skills may reduce positive symptoms via the improvement of depressive symptoms, which are increasingly regarded as risk factors for core psychotic symptoms. Furthermore, the reduction of avoidance and suppression may directly improve positive symptoms.

Anja S Goritz – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • more Adaptive versus less malAdaptive Coping what is more predictive of symptom severity development of a new scale to investigate Coping profiles across different psychopathological syndromes
    Journal of Affective Disorders, 2016
    Co-Authors: Steffen Moritz, Tania M Lincoln, Anna Katharina Jahns, Johanna Schroder, Thomas Berger, Jan Philipp Klein, Anja S Goritz

    Abstract:

    Abstract Background Lack of Adaptive and enhanced malAdaptive Coping with stress and negative emotions are implicated in many psychopathological disorders. We describe the development of a new scale to investigate the relative contribution of different Coping styles to psychopathology in a large population sample. We hypothesized that the magnitude of the supposed positive correlation between malAdaptive Coping and psychopathology would be stronger than the supposed negative correlation between Adaptive Coping and psychopathology. We also examined whether distinct Coping style patterns emerge for different psychopathological syndromes. Methods A total of 2200 individuals from the general population participated in an online survey. The Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), the Obsessive-Compulsive Inventory revised (OCI-R) and the Paranoia Checklist were administered along with a novel instrument called MalAdaptive and Adaptive Coping Styles (MAX) questionnaire. Participants were reassessed six months later. Results MAX consists of three dimensions representing Adaptive Coping, malAdaptive Coping and avoidance. Across all psychopathological syndromes, similar response patterns emerged. MalAdaptive Coping was more strongly related to psychopathology than Adaptive Coping both cross-sectionally and longitudinally. The overall number of Coping styles adopted by an individual predicted greater psychopathology. Mediation analysis suggests that a mild positive relationship between Adaptive and certain malAdaptive styles (emotional suppression) partially accounts for the attenuated relationship between Adaptive Coping and depressive symptoms. Limitations Results should be replicated in a clinical population. Conclusions Results suggest that malAdaptive and Adaptive Coping styles are not reciprocal. Reducing malAdaptive Coping seems to be more important for outcome than enhancing Adaptive Coping. The study supports transdiagnostic approaches advocating that malAdaptive Coping is a common factor across different psychopathologies.