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Addiction Severity Index

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Joh S Cacciola – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Addiction Severity Index asi summary scores comparison of the recent status scores of the asi 6 and the composite scores of the asi 5
    Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 2013
    Co-Authors: Cecile Denis, Joh S Cacciola, Arthu I Alterma

    Abstract:

    The characteristics and the validity of the Recent Status Scores (RSSs), the new summary scores generated by the sixth version of the Addiction Severity Index (ASI-6), are compared to the fifth version of the ASI summary scores, the Composite Scores (CSs). A sample of 82 randomly selected patients from substance abuse treatment programs were interviewed with the ASI-6, the ASI-5 and were administered a validity battery of questionnaires that included measures corresponding to each of the ASI domains. Each ASI-6 RSS was significantly correlated with its corresponding ASI-5 CS. The intercorrelations among the RSSs are low and none of these correlations were statistically different from the intercorrelations among CSs. In five of the seven areas, the ASI-6 RSSs were more highly correlated to the corresponding validity measures than were the ASI-5 CSs. The ASI-6 offers more comprehensive content in its scales than do those derived with earlier ASIs.

  • recent status scores for version 6 of the Addiction Severity Index asi 6
    Addiction, 2011
    Co-Authors: Joh S Cacciola, Arthu I Alterma, Ia Habing, Thomas A Mclella

    Abstract:

    Aims  To describe the derivation of recent status scores (RSSs) for version 6 of the Addiction Severity Index (ASI-6).

    Design  118 ASI-6 recent status items were subjected to nonparametric item response theory (NIRT) analyses followed by confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). Generalizability and concurrent validity of the derived scores were determined.

    Setting and participants  A total of 607 recent admissions to variety of substance abuse treatment programs constituted the derivation sample; a subset (n = 252) comprised the validity sample.

    Measurements  The ASI-6 interview and a validity battery of primarily self-report questionnaires that included at least one measure corresponding to each of the seven ASI domains were administered.

    Findings  Nine summary scales describing recent status that achieved or approached both high scalability and reliability were derived; one scale for each of six areas (medical, employment/finances, alcohol, drug, legal, psychiatric) and three scales for the family/social area. Intercorrelations among the RSSs also supported the multi-dimensionality of the ASI-6. Concurrent validity analyses yielded strong evidence supporting the validity of six of the RSSs (medical, alcohol, drug, employment, family/social problems, psychiatric). Evidence was weaker for the legal, family/social support and child problems RSSs. Generalizability analyses of the scales to males versus females and whites versus blacks supported the comparability of the findings, with slight exceptions.

    Conclusions  The psychometric analyses to derive Addiction Severity Index version 6 recent status scores support the multi-dimensionality of the Addiction Severity Index version 6 (i.e. the relative independence of different life functioning areas), consistent with research on earlier editions of the instrument. In general, the Addiction Severity Index version 6 scales demonstrate acceptable scalability, reliability and concurrent validity. While questions remain about the generalizability of some scales to population subgroups, the overall findings coupled with updated and more extensive content in the Addiction Severity Index version 6 support its use in clinical practice and research.

  • sixth version of the Addiction Severity Index assessing sensitivity to therapeutic change and retention predictors
    International Journal of Clinical and Health Psychology, 2011
    Co-Authors: Maria Jose Casareslopez, E Diazmesa, Paz Garciaportilla, Pila A Saiz, Maria Teresa Obesbascara, Eduardo Fonsecapedrero, Eduardo Carreno, Pedro Marina, Maria Teresa Ascara, Joh S Cacciola

    Abstract:

    Resumen en: The main purpose of this multicenter ex post facto prospective study is to examine the psychometric properties of the Addiction Severity Index version 6….

Arthu I Alterma – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Addiction Severity Index asi summary scores comparison of the recent status scores of the asi 6 and the composite scores of the asi 5
    Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 2013
    Co-Authors: Cecile Denis, Joh S Cacciola, Arthu I Alterma

    Abstract:

    The characteristics and the validity of the Recent Status Scores (RSSs), the new summary scores generated by the sixth version of the Addiction Severity Index (ASI-6), are compared to the fifth version of the ASI summary scores, the Composite Scores (CSs). A sample of 82 randomly selected patients from substance abuse treatment programs were interviewed with the ASI-6, the ASI-5 and were administered a validity battery of questionnaires that included measures corresponding to each of the ASI domains. Each ASI-6 RSS was significantly correlated with its corresponding ASI-5 CS. The intercorrelations among the RSSs are low and none of these correlations were statistically different from the intercorrelations among CSs. In five of the seven areas, the ASI-6 RSSs were more highly correlated to the corresponding validity measures than were the ASI-5 CSs. The ASI-6 offers more comprehensive content in its scales than do those derived with earlier ASIs.

  • recent status scores for version 6 of the Addiction Severity Index asi 6
    Addiction, 2011
    Co-Authors: Joh S Cacciola, Arthu I Alterma, Ia Habing, Thomas A Mclella

    Abstract:

    Aims  To describe the derivation of recent status scores (RSSs) for version 6 of the Addiction Severity Index (ASI-6).

    Design  118 ASI-6 recent status items were subjected to nonparametric item response theory (NIRT) analyses followed by confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). Generalizability and concurrent validity of the derived scores were determined.

    Setting and participants  A total of 607 recent admissions to variety of substance abuse treatment programs constituted the derivation sample; a subset (n = 252) comprised the validity sample.

    Measurements  The ASI-6 interview and a validity battery of primarily self-report questionnaires that included at least one measure corresponding to each of the seven ASI domains were administered.

    Findings  Nine summary scales describing recent status that achieved or approached both high scalability and reliability were derived; one scale for each of six areas (medical, employment/finances, alcohol, drug, legal, psychiatric) and three scales for the family/social area. Intercorrelations among the RSSs also supported the multi-dimensionality of the ASI-6. Concurrent validity analyses yielded strong evidence supporting the validity of six of the RSSs (medical, alcohol, drug, employment, family/social problems, psychiatric). Evidence was weaker for the legal, family/social support and child problems RSSs. Generalizability analyses of the scales to males versus females and whites versus blacks supported the comparability of the findings, with slight exceptions.

    Conclusions  The psychometric analyses to derive Addiction Severity Index version 6 recent status scores support the multi-dimensionality of the Addiction Severity Index version 6 (i.e. the relative independence of different life functioning areas), consistent with research on earlier editions of the instrument. In general, the Addiction Severity Index version 6 scales demonstrate acceptable scalability, reliability and concurrent validity. While questions remain about the generalizability of some scales to population subgroups, the overall findings coupled with updated and more extensive content in the Addiction Severity Index version 6 support its use in clinical practice and research.

  • initial evidence for the reliability and validity of a lite version of the Addiction Severity Index
    Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 2007
    Co-Authors: Joh S Cacciola, Thomas A Mclella, Arthu I Alterma, Kevi G Lynch

    Abstract:

    Abstract Purpose To evaluate the psychometric properties of a shortened version of the baseline ASI-5, the ASI-L-VA. Method Two samples were recruited from intensive outpatient treatment and a methadone maintenance clinic. For Sample A ( n  = 145), two versions of the Addiction Severity Index (i.e., ASI-5 and ASI-L-VA) were administered several days apart in counterbalanced order by different interviewers. Sample B ( n  = 50) was similarly administered the standard ASI-5 twice. Results For Sample A, the internal consistency (coefficient alphas) of 11 of 19 summary scores derived from the ASI-5 were good, 4 fair, and 4 unacceptable. The results for the ASI-L-VA summary scores indicated that eight were good, six fair, and five unacceptable. The correlations between ASI problem areas were generally low for both versions (supporting the independence of the ASI areas), and none of the t -tests comparing corresponding correlations between the ASI-5 and ASI-L-VA approached statistical significance. The Sample A intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) results evaluating agreement of the summary scores derived from the ASI-5 at one timepoint and those derived from ASI-L-VA at another point (i.e., concurrent validity) revealed at least fair agreement in all but one instance. Additionally, a comparison of the ICC results for Samples A and B (i.e., ASI-L-VA/ASI-5 versus ASI-5/ASI-5, respectively) revealed that in 13 of 26 cases the ICCs were at the same level of agreement. When level of agreement was discordant, in nine cases the ICCs comparing the ASI-5 and ASI-L-VA exhibited greater agreement and in four cases the ICCs comparing two ASI-5 administrations exhibited greater agreement. Conclusions The ASI-L-VA, a reduced item set from the ASI-5, yielded similar information on problem Severity as the standard ASI-5.

Thomas A Mclella – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • recent status scores for version 6 of the Addiction Severity Index asi 6
    Addiction, 2011
    Co-Authors: Joh S Cacciola, Arthu I Alterma, Ia Habing, Thomas A Mclella

    Abstract:

    Aims  To describe the derivation of recent status scores (RSSs) for version 6 of the Addiction Severity Index (ASI-6).

    Design  118 ASI-6 recent status items were subjected to nonparametric item response theory (NIRT) analyses followed by confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). Generalizability and concurrent validity of the derived scores were determined.

    Setting and participants  A total of 607 recent admissions to variety of substance abuse treatment programs constituted the derivation sample; a subset (n = 252) comprised the validity sample.

    Measurements  The ASI-6 interview and a validity battery of primarily self-report questionnaires that included at least one measure corresponding to each of the seven ASI domains were administered.

    Findings  Nine summary scales describing recent status that achieved or approached both high scalability and reliability were derived; one scale for each of six areas (medical, employment/finances, alcohol, drug, legal, psychiatric) and three scales for the family/social area. Intercorrelations among the RSSs also supported the multi-dimensionality of the ASI-6. Concurrent validity analyses yielded strong evidence supporting the validity of six of the RSSs (medical, alcohol, drug, employment, family/social problems, psychiatric). Evidence was weaker for the legal, family/social support and child problems RSSs. Generalizability analyses of the scales to males versus females and whites versus blacks supported the comparability of the findings, with slight exceptions.

    Conclusions  The psychometric analyses to derive Addiction Severity Index version 6 recent status scores support the multi-dimensionality of the Addiction Severity Index version 6 (i.e. the relative independence of different life functioning areas), consistent with research on earlier editions of the instrument. In general, the Addiction Severity Index version 6 scales demonstrate acceptable scalability, reliability and concurrent validity. While questions remain about the generalizability of some scales to population subgroups, the overall findings coupled with updated and more extensive content in the Addiction Severity Index version 6 support its use in clinical practice and research.

  • initial evidence for the reliability and validity of a lite version of the Addiction Severity Index
    Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 2007
    Co-Authors: Joh S Cacciola, Thomas A Mclella, Arthu I Alterma, Kevi G Lynch

    Abstract:

    Abstract Purpose To evaluate the psychometric properties of a shortened version of the baseline ASI-5, the ASI-L-VA. Method Two samples were recruited from intensive outpatient treatment and a methadone maintenance clinic. For Sample A ( n  = 145), two versions of the Addiction Severity Index (i.e., ASI-5 and ASI-L-VA) were administered several days apart in counterbalanced order by different interviewers. Sample B ( n  = 50) was similarly administered the standard ASI-5 twice. Results For Sample A, the internal consistency (coefficient alphas) of 11 of 19 summary scores derived from the ASI-5 were good, 4 fair, and 4 unacceptable. The results for the ASI-L-VA summary scores indicated that eight were good, six fair, and five unacceptable. The correlations between ASI problem areas were generally low for both versions (supporting the independence of the ASI areas), and none of the t -tests comparing corresponding correlations between the ASI-5 and ASI-L-VA approached statistical significance. The Sample A intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) results evaluating agreement of the summary scores derived from the ASI-5 at one timepoint and those derived from ASI-L-VA at another point (i.e., concurrent validity) revealed at least fair agreement in all but one instance. Additionally, a comparison of the ICC results for Samples A and B (i.e., ASI-L-VA/ASI-5 versus ASI-5/ASI-5, respectively) revealed that in 13 of 26 cases the ICCs were at the same level of agreement. When level of agreement was discordant, in nine cases the ICCs comparing the ASI-5 and ASI-L-VA exhibited greater agreement and in four cases the ICCs comparing two ASI-5 administrations exhibited greater agreement. Conclusions The ASI-L-VA, a reduced item set from the ASI-5, yielded similar information on problem Severity as the standard ASI-5.

  • predicting dsm iv dependence diagnoses from Addiction Severity Index composite scores
    Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 2006
    Co-Authors: Samuel H Rikoo, Joh S Cacciola, Arthu I Alterma, Deni Carise, Thomas A Mclella

    Abstract:

    This study, using data from the Drug Evaluation Network System and a study conducted through the Center for Studies on Addiction of the University of Pennsylvania/Philadelphia Veterans Administration Medical Center, sought to determine the potential of the Addiction Severity Index (ASI) to serve as a screening instrument for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) substance dependence. A significant positive correlation was found between ASI composite scores (CSs) and DSM-IV diagnoses of dependence in both the alcohol (r > .7) and drug (r > .5) domains (p < .01). Receiver operating characteristic analyses were run to predict DSM-IV alcohol and drug dependence diagnoses from the respective ASI CSs. Results showed good to strong prediction; ASI CSs identified dependent clients with approximately 85% sensitivity and 80% specificity. We recommend strategies for using ASI CSs as a diagnostic screening instrument in both research and treatment delivery environments.