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James Mackillop – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • steep delay discounting and Addictive Behavior a meta analysis of continuous associations
    Addiction, 2017
    Co-Authors: Michael Amlung, James Mackillop, Lana Vedelago, John Acker, Iris M Balodis

    Abstract:

    Aims
    To synthesize continuous associations between delayed reward discounting (DRD) and both addiction severity and quantity-frequency (QF); to examine moderators of these relationships; and to investigate publication bias.

    Methods
    Meta-analysis of published studies examining continuous associations between DRD and Addictive Behaviors. Published, peer-reviewed studies on Addictive Behaviors (alcohol, tobacco, cannabis, stimulants, opiates, and gambling) were identified via PubMed, MEDLINE, and PsycInfo. Studies were restricted to DRD measures of monetary gains. Random effects meta-analysis was conducted using Pearson’s r as the effect size. Publication bias was evaluated using fail-safe N, Begg-Mazumdar and Egger’s tests, meta-regression of publication year and effect size, and imputation of missing studies.

    Results
    The primary meta-analysis revealed a small magnitude effect size that was highly significant (r = 0.14, p < 10-14). Significantly larger effect sizes were observed for studies examining severity compared with QF (p = 0.01), but not between the type of Addictive Behavior (p = 0.30) or DRD assessment (p = 0.90). Indices of publication bias suggested a modest impact of unpublished findings.

    Conclusions
    Delayed reward discounting is robustly associated with continuous measures of addiction severity and quantity-frequency. This relation is generally robust across type of Addictive Behavior and delayed reward discounting assessment modality.

  • A social network analysis approach to alcohol use and co-occurring Addictive Behavior in young adults.
    Addictive behaviors, 2015
    Co-Authors: Matthew K. Meisel, James Mackillop, Allan Clifton, Adam S. Goodie

    Abstract:

    Abstract Introduction The current study applied egocentric social network analysis (SNA) to investigate the prevalence of Addictive Behavior and co-occurring substance use in college students’ networks. Specifically, we examined individuals’ perceptions of the frequency of network members’ co-occurring Addictive Behavior and investigated whether co-occurring Addictive Behavior is spread evenly throughout networks or is more localized in clusters. We also examined differences in network composition between individuals with varying levels of alcohol use. Method The study utilized an egocentric SNA approach in which respondents (“egos”) enumerated 30 of their closest friends, family members, co-workers, and significant others (“alters”) and the relations among alters listed. Participants were 281 undergraduates at a large university in the Southeastern United States. Results Robust associations were observed among the frequencies of gambling, smoking, drinking, and using marijuana by network members. We also found that alters tended to cluster together into two distinct groups: one cluster moderate-to-high on co-occurring Addictive Behavior and the other low on co-occurring Addictive Behavior. Lastly, significant differences were present when examining egos’ perceptions of alters’ substance use between the networks of at-risk, light, and nondrinkers. Conclusions These findings provide empirical evidence of distinct clustering of Addictive Behavior among young adults and suggest the promise of social network-based interventions for this cohort.

  • Delayed reward discounting and Addictive Behavior: a meta-analysis
    Psychopharmacology, 2011
    Co-Authors: James Mackillop, Michael Amlung, Lawrence H. Sweet, Marcus R. Munafò

    Abstract:

    Rationale Delayed reward discounting (DRD) is a Behavioral economic index of impulsivity and numerous studies have examined DRD in relation to Addictive Behavior. To synthesize the findings across the literature, the current review is a meta-analysis of studies comparing DRD between criterion groups exhibiting Addictive Behavior and control groups. Objectives The meta-analysis sought to characterize the overall patterns of findings, systematic variability by sample and study type, and possible small study (publication) bias. Methods Literature reviews identified 310 candidate articles from which 46 studies reporting 64 comparisons were identified (total N  = 56,013). Results From the total comparisons identified, a small magnitude effect was evident ( d  = .15; p  

Fuensanta López-rosales – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Measuring the relationship between social media use and Addictive Behavior and depression and suicide ideation among university students
    Computers in Human Behavior, 2018
    Co-Authors: José Luis Jasso-medrano, Fuensanta López-rosales

    Abstract:

    Abstract Addictive Behavior to social network sites is considered an alarming phenomenon where other psychopathological problems can be manifested. The purpose of the study is to analyze the relationship between the use and the Addictive Behavior of social media and the use of mobile devices, depression, and suicidal ideation. The questionnaires were applied to a sample of 374 university students where 58.6% were women and 41.4% men, with an average age of 20.01 years (SD = 1.84). Unlike the use of social media, Addictive Behavior was significantly related to depression and suicidal ideation. 36.1% of the sample reported having at least one idea in relation to suicide in the last two weeks. We propose an explanatory model that was adjusted appropriately and explained the Addictive Behavior with the frequency of mobile phone use, daily hours, depression, and suicidal ideation, the last one in a negative direction. It is concluded that, unlike excessive use, Addictive Behavior is associated with negative psychological characteristics. However, Addictive Behavior can also be considered a protective factor against suicidal ideation when relating to depression.

Marcus R. Munafò – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Delayed reward discounting and Addictive Behavior: a meta-analysis
    Psychopharmacology, 2011
    Co-Authors: James Mackillop, Michael Amlung, Lawrence H. Sweet, Marcus R. Munafò

    Abstract:

    Rationale Delayed reward discounting (DRD) is a Behavioral economic index of impulsivity and numerous studies have examined DRD in relation to Addictive Behavior. To synthesize the findings across the literature, the current review is a meta-analysis of studies comparing DRD between criterion groups exhibiting Addictive Behavior and control groups. Objectives The meta-analysis sought to characterize the overall patterns of findings, systematic variability by sample and study type, and possible small study (publication) bias. Methods Literature reviews identified 310 candidate articles from which 46 studies reporting 64 comparisons were identified (total N  = 56,013). Results From the total comparisons identified, a small magnitude effect was evident ( d  = .15; p  

  • Delayed reward discounting and Addictive Behavior: a meta-analysis
    Psychopharmacology, 2011
    Co-Authors: James Mackillop, Michael Amlung, Lauren R. Few, Lara A. Ray, Lawrence H. Sweet, Marcus R. Munafò

    Abstract:

    Rationale
    Delayed reward discounting (DRD) is a Behavioral economic index of impulsivity and numerous studies have examined DRD in relation to Addictive Behavior. To synthesize the findings across the literature, the current review is a meta-analysis of studies comparing DRD between criterion groups exhibiting Addictive Behavior and control groups.