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Adenosine Diphosphate Ribosylation

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Prasanta K. Subudhi – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Overexpression of an Adenosine DiphosphateRibosylation factor gene from the halophytic grass Spartina alterniflora confers salinity and drought tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis
    Plant Cell Reports, 2014
    Co-Authors: Ratna Karan, Prasanta K. Subudhi

    Abstract:

    Key message Isolation, cloning, and expression characterization of an ARF gene from S. alterniflora , demonstrating its involvement in abiotic stress tolerance . Abstract Adenosine DiphosphateRibosylation factors (ARFs) are small guanine nucleotide-binding proteins that play an important role in intracellular protein trafficking necessary for undertaking multiple physiological functions in plant growth and developmental processes. However, little is known about the mechanism of ARF functioning at the molecular level, as well as its involvement in abiotic stress tolerance. In this study, we demonstrated the direct involvement of an ARF gene SaARF from a grass halophyte Spartina alterniflora in abiotic stress adaptation for the first time. SaARF , which encodes a protein with predicted molecular mass of 21 kDa, revealed highest identity with ARF of Oryza sativa. The SaARF gene is transcriptionally regulated by salt, drought, cold, and ABA in the leaves and roots of S. alterniflora. Arabidopsis plants overexpressing SaARF showed improved seed germination and survival of seedlings under salinity stress. Similarly, SaARF transgenic Arabidopsis plants were more tolerant to drought stress, compared to wild-type plants, by maintaining chlorophyll synthesis, increasing osmolyte synthesis, and stabilizing membrane integrity. Oxidative damage due to moisture stress in transgenic Arabidopsis was also reduced possibly by activating antioxidant genes, AtSOD1 and AtCAT . Our results suggest that enhanced drought and salinity tolerance conferred by the SaARF gene may be due to its role in mediating multiple abiotic stress tolerance mechanisms.

  • overexpression of an Adenosine Diphosphate Ribosylation factor gene from the halophytic grass spartina alterniflora confers salinity and drought tolerance in transgenic arabidopsis
    Plant Cell Reports, 2014
    Co-Authors: Ratna Karan, Prasanta K. Subudhi

    Abstract:

    Key message
    Isolation, cloning, and expression characterization of an ARF gene fromS. alterniflora, demonstrating its involvement in abiotic stress tolerance.

Ratna Karan – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Overexpression of an Adenosine DiphosphateRibosylation factor gene from the halophytic grass Spartina alterniflora confers salinity and drought tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis
    Plant Cell Reports, 2014
    Co-Authors: Ratna Karan, Prasanta K. Subudhi

    Abstract:

    Key message Isolation, cloning, and expression characterization of an ARF gene from S. alterniflora , demonstrating its involvement in abiotic stress tolerance . Abstract Adenosine DiphosphateRibosylation factors (ARFs) are small guanine nucleotide-binding proteins that play an important role in intracellular protein trafficking necessary for undertaking multiple physiological functions in plant growth and developmental processes. However, little is known about the mechanism of ARF functioning at the molecular level, as well as its involvement in abiotic stress tolerance. In this study, we demonstrated the direct involvement of an ARF gene SaARF from a grass halophyte Spartina alterniflora in abiotic stress adaptation for the first time. SaARF , which encodes a protein with predicted molecular mass of 21 kDa, revealed highest identity with ARF of Oryza sativa. The SaARF gene is transcriptionally regulated by salt, drought, cold, and ABA in the leaves and roots of S. alterniflora. Arabidopsis plants overexpressing SaARF showed improved seed germination and survival of seedlings under salinity stress. Similarly, SaARF transgenic Arabidopsis plants were more tolerant to drought stress, compared to wild-type plants, by maintaining chlorophyll synthesis, increasing osmolyte synthesis, and stabilizing membrane integrity. Oxidative damage due to moisture stress in transgenic Arabidopsis was also reduced possibly by activating antioxidant genes, AtSOD1 and AtCAT . Our results suggest that enhanced drought and salinity tolerance conferred by the SaARF gene may be due to its role in mediating multiple abiotic stress tolerance mechanisms.

  • overexpression of an Adenosine Diphosphate Ribosylation factor gene from the halophytic grass spartina alterniflora confers salinity and drought tolerance in transgenic arabidopsis
    Plant Cell Reports, 2014
    Co-Authors: Ratna Karan, Prasanta K. Subudhi

    Abstract:

    Key message
    Isolation, cloning, and expression characterization of an ARF gene fromS. alterniflora, demonstrating its involvement in abiotic stress tolerance.

Waldemar Kolanus – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Guanine nucleotide exchange factors of the cytohesin family and their roles in signal transduction
    Immunological Reviews, 2007
    Co-Authors: Waldemar Kolanus

    Abstract:

    Members of the cytohesin protein family, a group of guanine nucleotide exchange factors for Adenosine Diphosphate Ribosylation factor (ARF) guanosine triphosphatases, have recently emerged as important regulators of signal transduction in vertebrate and invertebrate biology. These proteins share a modular domain structure, comprising carboxy-terminal membrane recruitment elements, a Sec7 homology effector domain, and an amino-terminal coiled-coil domain that serve as a platform for their integration into larger signaling complexes. Although these proteins have a highly similar overall build, their individual biological functions appear to be at least partly specific. Cytohesin-1 had been identified as a regulator of beta2 integrin inside-out regulation in immune cells and was subsequently shown to be involved in mitogen-associated protein kinase signaling in tumor cell proliferation as well as in T-helper cell activation and differentiation. Cytohesin-3, which had been discovered to be strongly associated with T-cell anergy, was very recently described as an essential component of insulin signal transduction in Drosophila and in human and murine liver cells. Future work will aim to dissect the mechanistic details of the modes of action of the cytohesins as well as to define the precise roles of these versatile proteins in vertebrates at the genetic level.