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Adenovirus Infection

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Christoph Aebi – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Serum C-reactive protein in children with Adenovirus Infection.
    Swiss medical weekly, 2002
    Co-Authors: Christina Appenzeller, Roland A Ammann, Andrea Duppenthaler, Meri Gorgievski-hrisoho, Christoph Aebi
    Abstract:

    (1) To evaluate serum C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations in children with Adenovirus Infection, and (2) to compare CRP concentrations in Adenovirus and influenza virus Infection. Retrospective, comparative single-center study conducted in Emergency Department patients of a paediatric tertiary care center. Comparison of CRP in Adenovirus Infection and influenza was performed in patient groups stratified according to age and duration of fever. In 87 children with Adenovirus Infection (median age, 1.5 years; interquartile range, 0.9-3.0), CRP levels of <2 mg/L, <10 mg/L, and <100 mg/L were found in 4 (4%), 12 (13%), and 66 (76%) patients, respectively. Median CRP in the children with Adenovirus Infection and in 130 children with influenza was 49 mg/L (21-96) and 9 mg/L (3-20), respectively (p = 0.001). A statistically significant difference remained when these 2 patient groups were stratified according to age (</=2 vs. >2 years) and duration of fever (</=3 vs. >3 days) (p <0.001). In Adenovirus Infection CRP concentrations were unrelated to age, duration of fever and severity of illness, as judged by the extent of mucosal involvement and by the frequency and duration of hospitalisation. Paediatric Adenovirus Infection is associated with substantially elevated CRP concentrations in the absence of secondary bacterial Infection. CRP levels were independent of the duration of illness, indicating that Adenoviruses trigger an immediate inflammatory host response resembling invasive bacterial Infection.

  • Serum C-reactive protein in children with Adenovirus Infection.
    Swiss Medical Weekly, 2002
    Co-Authors: Christina Appenzeller, Roland A Ammann, Andrea Duppenthaler, Meri Gorgievski-hrisoho, Christoph Aebi
    Abstract:

    Objectives: (1) To evaluate serum C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations in children with Adenovirus Infection, and (2) to compare CRP concentrations in Adenovirus and influenza virus Infection. Patients and Methods: Retrospective, comparative single-center study conducted in Emergency Department patients of a paediatric tertiary care center. Comparison of CRP in Adenovirus Infection and influenza was performed in patient groups stratified according to age and duration of fever. Results: In 87 children with Adenovirus Infection (median age, 1.5 years; interquartile range, 0.9-3.0), CRP levels of 2 years) and duration of fever (≤3 vs. >3 days) (p

Christine C. Ginocchio – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • genotype prevalence and risk factors for severe clinical Adenovirus Infection united states 2004 2006
    Clinical Infectious Diseases, 2007
    Co-Authors: Gregory C. Gray, Troy A. Mccarthy, Mark G. Lebeck, Kevin L. Russell, Adriana E. Kajon, Marie L. Landry, Diane S. Leland, Gregory A. Storch, David Schnurr, Christine C. Ginocchio
    Abstract:

    More than 35 years ago, population-based studies of viral respiratory illnesses among US families were conducted in Ohio [1], Kansas [2], Louisiana [3], New York [4], and Washington [5]. As a result of these investigations, scientists concluded that Adenovirus Infection was quite common among children. Approximately 50% of Infections were asymptomatic, and symptomatic Infections were typically mild and resolved without sequelae. In contrast, military populations experienced severe epidemics of acute respiratory disease, including pneumonia and encephalitis, especially involving Adenovirus types 4, 7, and 21. For example, in 1958, adenoviral Infection was reported to have caused hospitalization of an estimated 10% of military recruits [6] and to be the etiology of most respiratory disease during winter months. Subsequently, vaccines for Adenovirus types 4 and 7 were developed and effectively used among US military trainees from the 1970s until the late 1990s [7, 8]. Thus, until recently, Adenovirus Infection was considered to have little consequence, except for causing morbidity among military trainees. However, much has changed since these early epidemiological studies were conducted. In contrast to the modest number of Adenovirus types recognized 35 years ago, 51 unique serotypes are now recognized. Different serotypes have been found to have different tissue tropisms that correlate with different clinical manifestations of Infection. Limited epidemiological investigations have revealed that, among some specific serotypes, multiple genetic variants exist that often have quite different geographical distributions and associated virulence [9-11]. In addition, largely because of molecular diagnostics, Adenovirus Infection has been associated with a number of acute and chronic diseases, including chronic airway obstruction [12] and pulmonary dysplasia [13], myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy [14], mononucleosis-like syndromes [15], intussusception [16], sudden infant perinatal death [17], and obesity [18, 19]. Among some population groups, adenoviral Infection is common and, often, severe. For example, the incidence of adenoviral disease among bone marrow transplant recipients varies from 3% to 20% [20], and mortality can exceed 50% [21]. Similarly, multiple recent outbreaks of adenoviral Infection in the United States have frequently occurred among institutionalized children and in medical settings, resulting in significant morbidity and mortality among patients and medical staff [22]. In vitro studies suggest that specific Adenovirus types are more likely to respond to certain antiviral therapies [23]. Finally, since the military lost its manufacturer of Adenovirus types 4 and 7 vaccines in the late 1990s, numerous outbreaks of Adenovirus Infection have occurred among military trainees, resulting in great morbidity [24, 25]. Subsequently, the US Department of Defense identified a new vaccine manufacturer, and restoration of Adenovirus types 4 and 7 vaccines is projected for 2008 [25]. It seems prudent to investigate whether previously very effective and safe vaccines may also benefit some nonmilitary populations. Therefore, an updated look at the epidemiology of human Adenovirus Infection is warranted. In this report, we present 25 months of viral and patient epidemiological data on clinical Adenovirus Infection detected through a nationwide network of 22 US military and civilian medical facilities. We used a recently described molecular Adenovirus typing technique to characterize the strains of Adenovirus [26].

  • Genotype Prevalence and Risk Factors for Severe Clinical Adenovirus Infection, United States 2004–2006
    Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, 2007
    Co-Authors: Gregory C. Gray, Troy A. Mccarthy, Mark G. Lebeck, David P. Schnurr, Kevin L. Russell, Adriana E. Kajon, Marie L. Landry, Diane S. Leland, Gregory A. Storch, Christine C. Ginocchio
    Abstract:

    More than 35 years ago, population-based studies of viral respiratory illnesses among US families were conducted in Ohio [1], Kansas [2], Louisiana [3], New York [4], and Washington [5]. As a result of these investigations, scientists concluded that Adenovirus Infection was quite common among children. Approximately 50% of Infections were asymptomatic, and symptomatic Infections were typically mild and resolved without sequelae. In contrast, military populations experienced severe epidemics of acute respiratory disease, including pneumonia and encephalitis, especially involving Adenovirus types 4, 7, and 21. For example, in 1958, adenoviral Infection was reported to have caused hospitalization of an estimated 10% of military recruits [6] and to be the etiology of most respiratory disease during winter months. Subsequently, vaccines for Adenovirus types 4 and 7 were developed and effectively used among US military trainees from the 1970s until the late 1990s [7, 8]. Thus, until recently, Adenovirus Infection was considered to have little consequence, except for causing morbidity among military trainees. However, much has changed since these early epidemiological studies were conducted. In contrast to the modest number of Adenovirus types recognized 35 years ago, 51 unique serotypes are now recognized. Different serotypes have been found to have different tissue tropisms that correlate with different clinical manifestations of Infection. Limited epidemiological investigations have revealed that, among some specific serotypes, multiple genetic variants exist that often have quite different geographical distributions and associated virulence [9-11]. In addition, largely because of molecular diagnostics, Adenovirus Infection has been associated with a number of acute and chronic diseases, including chronic airway obstruction [12] and pulmonary dysplasia [13], myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy [14], mononucleosis-like syndromes [15], intussusception [16], sudden infant perinatal death [17], and obesity [18, 19]. Among some population groups, adenoviral Infection is common and, often, severe. For example, the incidence of adenoviral disease among bone marrow transplant recipients varies from 3% to 20% [20], and mortality can exceed 50% [21]. Similarly, multiple recent outbreaks of adenoviral Infection in the United States have frequently occurred among institutionalized children and in medical settings, resulting in significant morbidity and mortality among patients and medical staff [22]. In vitro studies suggest that specific Adenovirus types are more likely to respond to certain antiviral therapies [23]. Finally, since the military lost its manufacturer of Adenovirus types 4 and 7 vaccines in the late 1990s, numerous outbreaks of Adenovirus Infection have occurred among military trainees, resulting in great morbidity [24, 25]. Subsequently, the US Department of Defense identified a new vaccine manufacturer, and restoration of Adenovirus types 4 and 7 vaccines is projected for 2008 [25]. It seems prudent to investigate whether previously very effective and safe vaccines may also benefit some nonmilitary populations. Therefore, an updated look at the epidemiology of human Adenovirus Infection is warranted. In this report, we present 25 months of viral and patient epidemiological data on clinical Adenovirus Infection detected through a nationwide network of 22 US military and civilian medical facilities. We used a recently described molecular Adenovirus typing technique to characterize the strains of Adenovirus [26].

Christina Appenzeller – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Serum C-reactive protein in children with Adenovirus Infection.
    Swiss medical weekly, 2002
    Co-Authors: Christina Appenzeller, Roland A Ammann, Andrea Duppenthaler, Meri Gorgievski-hrisoho, Christoph Aebi
    Abstract:

    (1) To evaluate serum C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations in children with Adenovirus Infection, and (2) to compare CRP concentrations in Adenovirus and influenza virus Infection. Retrospective, comparative single-center study conducted in Emergency Department patients of a paediatric tertiary care center. Comparison of CRP in Adenovirus Infection and influenza was performed in patient groups stratified according to age and duration of fever. In 87 children with Adenovirus Infection (median age, 1.5 years; interquartile range, 0.9-3.0), CRP levels of <2 mg/L, <10 mg/L, and <100 mg/L were found in 4 (4%), 12 (13%), and 66 (76%) patients, respectively. Median CRP in the children with Adenovirus Infection and in 130 children with influenza was 49 mg/L (21-96) and 9 mg/L (3-20), respectively (p = 0.001). A statistically significant difference remained when these 2 patient groups were stratified according to age (</=2 vs. >2 years) and duration of fever (</=3 vs. >3 days) (p <0.001). In Adenovirus Infection CRP concentrations were unrelated to age, duration of fever and severity of illness, as judged by the extent of mucosal involvement and by the frequency and duration of hospitalisation. Paediatric Adenovirus Infection is associated with substantially elevated CRP concentrations in the absence of secondary bacterial Infection. CRP levels were independent of the duration of illness, indicating that Adenoviruses trigger an immediate inflammatory host response resembling invasive bacterial Infection.

  • Serum C-reactive protein in children with Adenovirus Infection.
    Swiss Medical Weekly, 2002
    Co-Authors: Christina Appenzeller, Roland A Ammann, Andrea Duppenthaler, Meri Gorgievski-hrisoho, Christoph Aebi
    Abstract:

    Objectives: (1) To evaluate serum C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations in children with Adenovirus Infection, and (2) to compare CRP concentrations in Adenovirus and influenza virus Infection. Patients and Methods: Retrospective, comparative single-center study conducted in Emergency Department patients of a paediatric tertiary care center. Comparison of CRP in Adenovirus Infection and influenza was performed in patient groups stratified according to age and duration of fever. Results: In 87 children with Adenovirus Infection (median age, 1.5 years; interquartile range, 0.9-3.0), CRP levels of 2 years) and duration of fever (≤3 vs. >3 days) (p

Terry J Fry – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

M. D. S. Walters – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Toxic shock-like syndrome caused by Adenovirus Infection.
    Archives of disease in childhood, 1992
    Co-Authors: Kalifa Bojang, M. D. S. Walters
    Abstract:

    Adenovirus Infections commonly occur in childhood and produce a wide range of clinical disease. The most common sites of Infection are the respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts but involvement of cardiovascular, neurological, cutaneous, ophthalmic, renal, and hepatic systems can also occur. A case of toxic shock-like syndrome with symptoms of multiorgan involvement resulting from Adenovirus Infection is reported.