Adhesive Primer - Explore the Science & Experts | ideXlab

Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

Adhesive Primer

The Experts below are selected from a list of 204 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Kazuomi Suzuki – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Bond Strength of Resin to Acid-etched Dentin Studied by 13C NMR: Interaction between N-methacryloyl-ω-Amino Acid Primer and Dentinal Collagen
    Journal of Dental Research, 2020
    Co-Authors: Norihiro Nishiyama, Kazuomi Suzuki, Tetsuo Asakura, K. Komatsu, Kimiya Nemoto

    Abstract:

    The application of the hydrophilic methacrylate Primer to acid-etched dentin increases the bond strength of the resin to the acid-etched dentin. However, the mechanism for the bonding of the resin to dentinal collagen through the Primer remains to be determined. Before a more effective Adhesive Primer can be developed, we must understand the adsorption behavior of the Primer to the dentinal collagen. The purpose of this study was to determine how 5 derivatives of N-methacryloyl-ω-amino acid (NMwA) Primers enhance the bonding of the resin to acid-etched dentin. The interaction between the NMwA Primers and dentinal collagen was studied by the 13C NMR technique, including the observation of spin-lattice relaxation times, T1. When the dentinal collagen was dispersed into the NMwA solution, the T1 values of the two carbonyl carbons attributed to the amide and the carboxylic acid in the NMwA molecule decreased dramatically. This result was due to the interaction between the amide group and the carboxylic acid g…

  • effect of Adhesive Primer developed exclusively for heat curing resin on Adhesive strength between plastic artificial tooth and acrylic denture base resin
    Dental Materials Journal, 2006
    Co-Authors: Goro Nishigawa, Yukinori Maruo, M Okamoto, Yoshihiro Kinuta, Shougo Minagi, Masao Irie, Kazuomi Suzuki

    Abstract:

    Despite progress in the development of denture base resin and artificial tooth materials, dental clinics are still plagued with artificial teeth falling off the denture base – due to poor bond strength – after denture delivery. Against this background, this study sought to examine the effect and durability of an Adhesive Primer developed exclusively for heat-curing resin on the Adhesive strength of heat-curing denture base acrylic resin to plastic artificial tooth. Test specimens were divided into four groups according to the treatment method of the artificial tooth’s test bonding surface: air abrasion, Adhesive Primer application, Adhesive Primer application after air abrasion, and pretreatment only (control) . After heat curing of acrylic resin onto the bonding surface, shear test was performed for two storage periods: 24-hour versus 100-day water storage. From the results obtained, it was revealed that the evaluated Adhesive Primer was significantly effective in increasing Adhesive strength between artificial tooth and acrylic resin, although specimens were stored in water for 100 days.

  • Effect of Plasma Treatment on Adhesion of Self-curing Repair Resin to Acrylic Denture Base
    Dental Materials Journal, 2004
    Co-Authors: Goro Nishigawa, Yukinori Maruo, M Okamoto, Masao Irie, Shogo Minagi, Kazuomi Suzuki

    Abstract:

    Plasma irradiation on surface of heat-cured acrylic resin prior to processing self-curing acrylic resin is likely to effectively increase the Adhesive strength between these materials for short-term period. However, long-term reliability of Adhesive strength between these materials has not been clarified yet. In the present study, these materials were stored in water for a long period (100 days), and the effect on their shear bond strength was investigated. Forty-four test specimens with flat bonding test surface were made with heat-cured acrylic resin. They were divided into four groups according to treatment procedures for bonding surface: plasma treatment, Adhesive Primer application, Adhesive Primer application after plasma treatment, and no treatment (for control). Self-curing acrylic resin was processed against all bonding surfaces. After storage in water for 100 days, shear bond strength values between heat-cured and self-cured acrylic resins were measured. Specimens in plasma treatment group exhibited higher shear bond strength value than those in control, although the difference was not significant.

Mitsuru Atsuta – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Bonding of dual-cured resin cement to zirconia ceramic using phosphate acid ester monomer and zirconate coupler
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research – Part B Applied Biomaterials, 2006
    Co-Authors: Keiichi Yoshida, Yukiko Tsuo, Mitsuru Atsuta

    Abstract:

    This study evaluated the shear bond strength between dual-cured resin luting cement and pure zirconium (99.9%) and industrially manufactured yttrium-oxide-partially-stabilized zirconia ceramic, and the effect of MDP (10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate) Primer (MP) and zirconate coupler (ZC) on bond strength. Two different-shaped pure zirconium and zirconia ceramic specimens were untreated or treated with various Primers, including different concentrations of MP containing phosphoric acid ester monomer (MDP) in ethanol, ZC containing a zirconate coupling agent in ethanol, or a mixture of MP and ZC. The specimens were then cemented together with dual-cured resin luting cement (Clapearl DC). Half of the specimens were stored in water at 37 degrees C for 24 h and the other half were thermocycled 10,000 times before shear bond strength testing. The bond strengths of resin luting cement to both the zirconium and zirconia ceramic were enhanced by the application of most MPs, ZCs, and the mixtures of MP and ZC. For the group (MP2.0+ZC1.0) containing 2.0 wt % MP and 1.0 wt % ZC, no significant difference was observed between in shear bond strength before and after thermal cycling for both zirconium and zirconia ceramic (p > 0.05). For the other Primers, statistically significant differences in shear bond strength before and after thermal cycling were observed (p < 0.05). The application of the mixture of MP and ZC (MP2.0+ZC1.0) was effective for bonding between zirconia ceramic and dual-cured resin luting cement. This Primer may be clinically useful as an Adhesive Primer for zirconia ceramic restoration.

Ali Miserez – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Mussel adhesion is dictated by time-regulated secretion and molecular conformation of mussel Adhesive proteins
    Nature Communications, 2015
    Co-Authors: Luigi Petrone, Navinkumar J. Patil, Bruno Zappone, Akshita Kumar, Clarinda N. Sutanto, Srinivasaraghavan Kannan, Alagappan Palaniappan, Shahrouz Amini, Chandra Verma, Ali Miserez

    Abstract:

    Interfacial water constitutes a formidable barrier to strong surface bonding, hampering the development of water-resistant synthetic Adhesives. Notwithstanding this obstacle, the Asian green mussel Perna viridis attaches firmly to underwater surfaces via a proteinaceous secretion (byssus). Extending beyond the currently known design principles of mussel adhesion, here we elucidate the precise time-regulated secretion of P. viridis mussel Adhesive proteins. The vanguard 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (Dopa)-rich protein Pvfp-5 acts as an Adhesive Primer, overcoming repulsive hydration forces by displacing surface-bound water and generating strong surface adhesion. Using homology modelling and molecular dynamics simulations, we find that all mussel Adhesive proteins are largely unordered, with Pvfp-5 adopting a disordered structure and elongated conformation whereby all Dopa residues reside on the protein surface. Time-regulated secretion and structural disorder of mussel Adhesive proteins appear essential for optimizing extended nonspecific surface interactions and byssus’ assembly. Our findings reveal molecular-scale principles to help the development of wet-resistant Adhesives.

  • Mussel adhesion is dictated by time-regulated secretion and molecular conformation of mussel Adhesive proteins
    Nature Communications, 2015
    Co-Authors: Luigi Petrone, Navinkumar J. Patil, Bruno Zappone, Akshita Kumar, Clarinda N. Sutanto, Srinivasaraghavan Kannan, Alagappan Palaniappan, Shahrouz Amini, Chandra Verma, Ali Miserez

    Abstract:

    Interfacial water constitutes a formidable barrier to strong surface bonding, hampering the development of water-resistant synthetic Adhesives. Notwithstanding this obstacle, the Asian green mussel Perna viridis attaches firmly to underwater surfaces via a proteinaceous secretion (byssus). Extending beyond the currently known design principles of mussel adhesion, here we elucidate the precise time-regulated secretion of P. viridis mussel Adhesive proteins. The vanguard 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (Dopa)-rich protein Pvfp-5 acts as an Adhesive Primer, overcoming repulsive hydration forces by displacing surface-bound water and generating strong surface adhesion. Using homology modelling and molecular dynamics simulations, we find that all mussel Adhesive proteins are largely unordered, with Pvfp-5 adopting a disordered structure and elongated conformation whereby all Dopa residues reside on the protein surface. Time-regulated secretion and structural disorder of mussel Adhesive proteins appear essential for optimizing extended nonspecific surface interactions and byssus’ assembly. Our findings reveal molecular-scale principles to help the development of wet-resistant Adhesives. Interfacial water constitutes a formidable barrier to strong surface bonding, hampering the development of water-resistant synthetic Adhesives. Here, the authors elucidate the precise time-regulated secretion of mussel Adhesive proteins in Perna viridis , probing their surface structures and subsequent roles.