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Adhesive Resin

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Santiago González-lópez – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Bond strength of self-Adhesive Resin cements to different treated indirect composites
    Clinical Oral Investigations, 2013
    Co-Authors: M. Victoria Fuentes, Laura Ceballos, Santiago González-lópez

    Abstract:

    Objectives The objective of this study was to determine microtensile bond strength (μTBS) to dentin of three self-Adhesive and a total-etch Resin cements used for luting different treated indirect composites. Materials and methods Composite overlays (Filtek Z250) were prepared. Their intaglio surfaces were ground with 600-grit SiC papers and randomly assigned to three different surface treatments: no treatment, silane application (RelyX Ceramic Primer), and silane agent followed by a bonding agent (Adper Scotchbond 1 XT). The composite overlays were luted to flat dentin surfaces of extracted human third molars using the following self-Adhesive Resin cements: RelyX Unicem, Maxcem Elite and G-Cem, and a total-etch Resin cement, RelyX ARC. The bonded assemblies were stored in water (24 h, 37 °C) and subsequently prepared for μTBS testing. Beams of approximately 1 mm^2 were tested in tension at 1 mm/min in a universal tester (Instron 3345). Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Student–Newman–Keuls tests ( α  = 0.05). Results A significant influence of the Resin cement used was detected. Composite surface treatment and the interaction between the Resin cement applied and surface treatment did not affect μTBS. Conclusions Surface treatment of indirect Resin composite did not improve the μTBS results of dentin/composite overlay complex. Self-Adhesive Resin cements tested obtained lower μTBS than the total-etch Resin cement RelyX ARC. Specimens luted with Maxcem Elite exhibited the highest percentage of pretesting failures. Clinical relevance Surface treatment of indirect Resin composite with silane or silane followed by a bonding agent did not affect bond strength to dentin.

  • Bond strength of self-Adhesive Resin cements to different treated indirect composites
    Clinical Oral Investigations, 2013
    Co-Authors: M. Victoria Fuentes, Laura Ceballos, Santiago González-lópez

    Abstract:

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study was to determine microtensile bond strength (μTBS) to dentin of three self-Adhesive and a total-etch Resin cements used for luting different treated indirect composites.\n\nMATERIALS AND METHODS: Composite overlays (Filtek Z250) were prepared. Their intaglio surfaces were ground with 600-grit SiC papers and randomly assigned to three different surface treatments: no treatment, silane application (RelyX Ceramic Primer), and silane agent followed by a bonding agent (Adper Scotchbond 1 XT). The composite overlays were luted to flat dentin surfaces of extracted human third molars using the following self-Adhesive Resin cements: RelyX Unicem, Maxcem Elite and G-Cem, and a total-etch Resin cement, RelyX ARC. The bonded assemblies were stored in water (24 h, 37 °C) and subsequently prepared for μTBS testing. Beams of approximately 1 mm(2) were tested in tension at 1 mm/min in a universal tester (Instron 3345). Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls tests (α = 0.05).\n\nRESULTS: A significant influence of the Resin cement used was detected. Composite surface treatment and the interaction between the Resin cement applied and surface treatment did not affect μTBS.\n\nCONCLUSIONS: Surface treatment of indirect Resin composite did not improve the μTBS results of dentin/composite overlay complex. Self-Adhesive Resin cements tested obtained lower μTBS than the total-etch Resin cement RelyX ARC. Specimens luted with Maxcem Elite exhibited the highest percentage of pretesting failures.\n\nCLINICAL RELEVANCE: Surface treatment of indirect Resin composite with silane or silane followed by a bonding agent did not affect bond strength to dentin.

M. Victoria Fuentes – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Bond strength of self-Adhesive Resin cements to different treated indirect composites
    Clinical Oral Investigations, 2013
    Co-Authors: M. Victoria Fuentes, Laura Ceballos, Santiago González-lópez

    Abstract:

    Objectives The objective of this study was to determine microtensile bond strength (μTBS) to dentin of three self-Adhesive and a total-etch Resin cements used for luting different treated indirect composites. Materials and methods Composite overlays (Filtek Z250) were prepared. Their intaglio surfaces were ground with 600-grit SiC papers and randomly assigned to three different surface treatments: no treatment, silane application (RelyX Ceramic Primer), and silane agent followed by a bonding agent (Adper Scotchbond 1 XT). The composite overlays were luted to flat dentin surfaces of extracted human third molars using the following self-Adhesive Resin cements: RelyX Unicem, Maxcem Elite and G-Cem, and a total-etch Resin cement, RelyX ARC. The bonded assemblies were stored in water (24 h, 37 °C) and subsequently prepared for μTBS testing. Beams of approximately 1 mm^2 were tested in tension at 1 mm/min in a universal tester (Instron 3345). Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Student–Newman–Keuls tests ( α  = 0.05). Results A significant influence of the Resin cement used was detected. Composite surface treatment and the interaction between the Resin cement applied and surface treatment did not affect μTBS. Conclusions Surface treatment of indirect Resin composite did not improve the μTBS results of dentin/composite overlay complex. Self-Adhesive Resin cements tested obtained lower μTBS than the total-etch Resin cement RelyX ARC. Specimens luted with Maxcem Elite exhibited the highest percentage of pretesting failures. Clinical relevance Surface treatment of indirect Resin composite with silane or silane followed by a bonding agent did not affect bond strength to dentin.

  • Bond strength of self-Adhesive Resin cements to different treated indirect composites
    Clinical Oral Investigations, 2013
    Co-Authors: M. Victoria Fuentes, Laura Ceballos, Santiago González-lópez

    Abstract:

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study was to determine microtensile bond strength (μTBS) to dentin of three self-Adhesive and a total-etch Resin cements used for luting different treated indirect composites.\n\nMATERIALS AND METHODS: Composite overlays (Filtek Z250) were prepared. Their intaglio surfaces were ground with 600-grit SiC papers and randomly assigned to three different surface treatments: no treatment, silane application (RelyX Ceramic Primer), and silane agent followed by a bonding agent (Adper Scotchbond 1 XT). The composite overlays were luted to flat dentin surfaces of extracted human third molars using the following self-Adhesive Resin cements: RelyX Unicem, Maxcem Elite and G-Cem, and a total-etch Resin cement, RelyX ARC. The bonded assemblies were stored in water (24 h, 37 °C) and subsequently prepared for μTBS testing. Beams of approximately 1 mm(2) were tested in tension at 1 mm/min in a universal tester (Instron 3345). Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls tests (α = 0.05).\n\nRESULTS: A significant influence of the Resin cement used was detected. Composite surface treatment and the interaction between the Resin cement applied and surface treatment did not affect μTBS.\n\nCONCLUSIONS: Surface treatment of indirect Resin composite did not improve the μTBS results of dentin/composite overlay complex. Self-Adhesive Resin cements tested obtained lower μTBS than the total-etch Resin cement RelyX ARC. Specimens luted with Maxcem Elite exhibited the highest percentage of pretesting failures.\n\nCLINICAL RELEVANCE: Surface treatment of indirect Resin composite with silane or silane followed by a bonding agent did not affect bond strength to dentin.

Jayalakshmi Vaidyanathan – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • recent advances in the theory and mechanism of Adhesive Resin bonding to dentin a critical review
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B, 2009
    Co-Authors: T. K. Vaidyanathan, Jayalakshmi Vaidyanathan

    Abstract:

    Dentin bonding issues involving Adhesive Resins have attracted considerable research interest in recent years. An important advance due to the ongoing research is the concept of hybridization of the tissue with primer/Adhesive systems. Hybridization involves permeation of primer monomer into the tissue substrate. Although the mechanism of Adhesive permeation and interaction with tissue may be complex, significant advances have been made. In systems where etching precedes priming and bonding steps, the Hoy’s solubility parameter compatibility of the primer formulation with that of demineralized dentin matrix may determine Adhesive permeability. Monomer permeation brings the primer atoms in closer contact with the substrate atoms, leading to Adhesive interactions through van der Waals, hydrogen bonding, and electrostatic interactions. In self-etch primer systems, stronger electrostatic interaction between primer monomers and hydroxyapatite has been used to explain the adhesion process. These interactions have been computer-modeled and analyzed. Such interactions and subsequent polymerization of the monomer promote improved bond strength and efficient margin sealing. Incomplete permeation of monomer into the full depth of demineralized region may, however, leave exposed collagen fibrils and cause nanoleakage of water into these regions through a 20–100 nm sized marginal gap, leading to subsequent hydrolytic degradation of these collagen fibrils and the hybrid layer. Microleakage is also a problem in some single step formulations. In this review, we analyze these current theoretical and mechanism-related issues of interest in Adhesive Resin bonding to dentin, and outline the continuing problems that need to be overcome in the future. © 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2009

  • Recent advances in the theory and mechanism of Adhesive Resin bonding to dentin: A critical review
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research – Part B Applied Biomaterials, 2009
    Co-Authors: T. K. Vaidyanathan, Jayalakshmi Vaidyanathan

    Abstract:

    Dentin bonding issues involving Adhesive Resins have attracted considerable research interest in recent years. An important advance due to the ongoing research is the concept of hybridization of the tissue with primer/Adhesive systems. Hybridization involves permeation of primer monomer into the tissue substrate. Although the mechanism of Adhesive permeation and interaction with tissue may be complex, significant advances have been made. In systems where etching precedes priming and bonding steps, the Hoy’s solubility parameter compatibility of the primer formulation with that of demineralized dentin matrix may determine Adhesive permeability. Monomer permeation brings the primer atoms in closer contact with the substrate atoms, leading to Adhesive interactions through van der Waals, hydrogen bonding, and electrostatic interactions. In self-etch primer systems, stronger electrostatic interaction between primer monomers and hydroxyapatite has been used to explain the adhesion process. These interactions have been computer-modeled and analyzed. Such interactions and subsequent polymerization of the monomer promote improved bond strength and efficient margin sealing. Incomplete permeation of monomer into the full depth of demineralized region may, however, leave exposed collagen fibrils and cause nanoleakage of water into these regions through a 20-100 nm sized marginal gap, leading to subsequent hydrolytic degradation of these collagen fibrils and the hybrid layer. Microleakage is also a problem in some single step formulations. In this review, we analyze these current theoretical and mechanism-related issues of interest in Adhesive Resin bonding to dentin, and outline the continuing problems that need to be overcome in the future.