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Administered Questionnaire

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T. Tetzschner – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Assessment of lower urinary tract symptoms in women by a self-Administered Questionnaire: test-retest reliability.
    International urogynecology journal and pelvic floor dysfunction, 1996
    Co-Authors: Inge Bernstein, T. Sejr, I. Able, Jens Thorup Andersen, W. Fischer-rasmussen, Peter Klarskov, Gunnar Lose, H. Madsen, S. Mortensen, T. Tetzschner

    Abstract:

    A self-Administered Questionnaire assessing female lower urinary tract symptoms and their impact on quality of life is described and validated, on 56 females in six participating departments. The patients answered two identical Questionnaires on separate occasions before treatment. Test-retest reliability of the Questionnaire, correlation between the symptoms and their troublesomeness, and the reproducibility of this correlation were assessed. The percentage of mistakes in answers to each of the questions varied from 1.8% to 49.1%, mainly owing to missing answers in the item groups: appliances, sexual function and social activities. Test-retest showed a repeat frequency of 50.0%–91.0% for symptoms and 44.6%–82.1% for trouble. A highly significant positive correlation was found between symptoms and trouble, which was most pronounced for questions concerning pain and incontinence. This correlation was consistent within time. The primary validation of this Questionnaire is good. Its relevance as a basis for medical priority and clinical decision making remains to be investigated.

Ian Roberts – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • A self-Administered Questionnaire to estimate the distance and mode of children’s travel to school in urban India
    , 2015
    Co-Authors: Shailaja Tetali, Phil Edwards, Gvs Murthy, Ian Roberts

    Abstract:

    A self-Administered Questionnaire produced as part of a study on distribution of children’s mode of travel to school in Hyderabad (Telangana, India). The Questionnaire has 21 multiple choice items: four on demographics, nine on mode of travel and travel during dry or wet weather, two items on parental permissions for independent travel, three on children’s perceptions of safety, including road traffic injuries, and three items on physical activity after school.

  • Development and validation of a self-Administered Questionnaire to estimate the distance and mode of children’s travel to school in urban India
    BMC medical research methodology, 2015
    Co-Authors: Shailaja Tetali, Phil Edwards, Gudlavalleti V. S. Murthy, Ian Roberts

    Abstract:

    Although some 300 million Indian children travel to school every day, little is known about how they get there. This information is important for transport planners and public health authorities. This paper presents the development of a self-Administered Questionnaire and examines its reliability and validity in estimating distance and mode of travel to school in a low resource urban setting. We developed a Questionnaire on children’s travel to school. We assessed test re-test reliability by repeating the Questionnaire one week later (n = 61). The Questionnaire was improved and re-tested (n = 68). We examined the convergent validity of distance estimates by comparing estimates based on the nearest landmark to children’s homes with a ‘gold standard’ based on one-to-one interviews with children using detailed maps (n = 50). Most questions showed fair to almost perfect agreement. Questions on usual mode of travel (κ 0.73- 0.84) and road injury (κ 0.61- 0.72) were found to be more reliable than those on parental permissions (κ 0.18- 0.30), perception of safety (κ 0.00- 0.54), and physical activity (κ -0.01- 0.07). The distance estimated by the nearest landmark method was not significantly different than the in-depth method for walking , 52 m [95 % CI -32 m to 135 m], 10 % of the mean difference, and for walking and cycling combined, 65 m [95 % CI -30 m to 159 m], 11 % of the mean difference. For children who used motorized transport (excluding private school bus), the nearest landmark method under-estimated distance by an average of 325 metres [95 % CI −664 m to 1314 m], 15 % of the mean difference. A self-Administered Questionnaire was found to provide reliable information on the usual mode of travel to school, and road injury, in a small sample of children in Hyderabad, India. The ‘nearest landmark’ method can be applied in similar low-resource settings, for a reasonably accurate estimate of the distance from a child’s home to school.

Inge Bernstein – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Assessment of lower urinary tract symptoms in women by a self-Administered Questionnaire: test-retest reliability.
    International urogynecology journal and pelvic floor dysfunction, 1996
    Co-Authors: Inge Bernstein, T. Sejr, I. Able, Jens Thorup Andersen, W. Fischer-rasmussen, Peter Klarskov, Gunnar Lose, H. Madsen, S. Mortensen, T. Tetzschner

    Abstract:

    A self-Administered Questionnaire assessing female lower urinary tract symptoms and their impact on quality of life is described and validated, on 56 females in six participating departments. The patients answered two identical Questionnaires on separate occasions before treatment. Test-retest reliability of the Questionnaire, correlation between the symptoms and their troublesomeness, and the reproducibility of this correlation were assessed. The percentage of mistakes in answers to each of the questions varied from 1.8% to 49.1%, mainly owing to missing answers in the item groups: appliances, sexual function and social activities. Test-retest showed a repeat frequency of 50.0%–91.0% for symptoms and 44.6%–82.1% for trouble. A highly significant positive correlation was found between symptoms and trouble, which was most pronounced for questions concerning pain and incontinence. This correlation was consistent within time. The primary validation of this Questionnaire is good. Its relevance as a basis for medical priority and clinical decision making remains to be investigated.