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Administrative Burden

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Christy Harris Lemak – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Administrative Burden and its implications for outpatient substance abuse treatment organizations.
    Psychiatric services (Washington D.C.), 2003
    Co-Authors: Christy Harris Lemak, Jeffrey A. Alexander, Cynthia I. Campbell

    Abstract:

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to examine the extent of Administrative Burden on outpatient substance abuse treatment organizations and its implications for efficiency and productivity. METHODS: Using data from the 1995 and 2000 waves of the National Drug Abuse Treatment System Survey, the authors conducted multivariate analyses using generalized estimating equations. Two measures of organizational efficiency (operating expenses per therapy hour and salary and wages per therapy hour) and one measure of productivity (treatment sessions per full-time equivalent) were included. RESULTS: The average Administrative Burden in outpatient substance abuse treatment units increased between 1995 and 2000. The weighted and adjusted national sample data showed that one hour of substance abuse treatment therapy was associated with approximately $60 (in 1999 dollars) of nonsalary operating expenses and $124 in salaries and wages. Approximately eight treatment sessions were delivered each week by each full-time-equ…

  • The effects of managed care on Administrative Burden in outpatient substance abuse treatment facilities.
    Medical care, 1997
    Co-Authors: Jeffrey A. Alexander, Christy Harris Lemak

    Abstract:

    tention in empirical studies and policy debates. This study examines one such consequence-Administrative Burden on organizations that deliver outpatient substance abuse treatment (OSAT). Administrative Burden may be defined as the costs to an organization of managing the requirements of managed care. These costs are expressed in terms of time that Administrative and treatment staff spend in nontreatment-related activity in response to the requirements of managed care organizations. To the extent that managed care Administrative time exceeds that normally re-

Jeffrey A. Alexander – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Administrative Burden and its implications for outpatient substance abuse treatment organizations.
    Psychiatric services (Washington D.C.), 2003
    Co-Authors: Christy Harris Lemak, Jeffrey A. Alexander, Cynthia I. Campbell

    Abstract:

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to examine the extent of Administrative Burden on outpatient substance abuse treatment organizations and its implications for efficiency and productivity. METHODS: Using data from the 1995 and 2000 waves of the National Drug Abuse Treatment System Survey, the authors conducted multivariate analyses using generalized estimating equations. Two measures of organizational efficiency (operating expenses per therapy hour and salary and wages per therapy hour) and one measure of productivity (treatment sessions per full-time equivalent) were included. RESULTS: The average Administrative Burden in outpatient substance abuse treatment units increased between 1995 and 2000. The weighted and adjusted national sample data showed that one hour of substance abuse treatment therapy was associated with approximately $60 (in 1999 dollars) of nonsalary operating expenses and $124 in salaries and wages. Approximately eight treatment sessions were delivered each week by each full-time-equ…

  • The effects of managed care on Administrative Burden in outpatient substance abuse treatment facilities.
    Medical care, 1997
    Co-Authors: Jeffrey A. Alexander, Christy Harris Lemak

    Abstract:

    tention in empirical studies and policy debates. This study examines one such consequence-Administrative Burden on organizations that deliver outpatient substance abuse treatment (OSAT). Administrative Burden may be defined as the costs to an organization of managing the requirements of managed care. These costs are expressed in terms of time that Administrative and treatment staff spend in nontreatment-related activity in response to the requirements of managed care organizations. To the extent that managed care Administrative time exceeds that normally re-

Donald P. Moynihan – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • human capital and Administrative Burden the role of cognitive resources in citizen state interactions
    Public Administration Review, 2020
    Co-Authors: Julian Christensen, Pamela Herd, Lene Aaroe, Martin Baekgaard, Donald P. Moynihan

    Abstract:

    : One means by which the state reinforces inequality is by imposing Administrative Burdens that loom larger for citizens with lower levels of human capital. Integrating insights from various disciplines, this article focuses on one aspect of human capital: cognitive resources. The authors outline a model that explains how Burdens and cognitive resources, especially executive functioning, interrelate. The article then presents illustrative examples, highlighting three common life factors-scarcity, health problems, and age-related cognitive decline. These factors create a human capital catch-22, increasing people’s likelihood of needing state assistance while simultaneously undermining the cognitive resources required to negotiate the Burdens they encounter while seeking such assistance. The result is to reduce access to state benefits and increase inequality. The article concludes by calling for scholars of behavioral public administration and public administration more generally to incorporate more attention to human capital into their research.

  • Administrative Burden: Learning, Psychological, and Compliance Costs in Citizen-State Interactions
    Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory, 2014
    Co-Authors: Donald P. Moynihan, Pamela Herd, Hope Harvey

    Abstract:

    This article offers two theoretical contributions. First, we develop the concept of Administrative Burden as an important variable in understanding how citizens experience the state. Administrative Burden is conceptualized as a function of learning, psychological, and compliance costs that citizens experience in their interactions with government. Second, we argue that Administrative Burden is a venue of politics, that is, the level of Administrative Burden placed on an individual, as well as the distribution of Burden between the state and the individual, will often be a function of deliberate political choice rather than simply a product of historical accident or neglect. The opaque nature of Administrative Burdens may facilitate their use as forms of “hidden politics,” where significant policy changes occur without broad political consideration. We illustrate this argument via an analysis of the evolution of Medicaid policies in the state of Wisconsin. Across three Governorships, the level of Burden evolved in ways consistent with the differing political philosophies of each Governor, with federal actors playing a secondary but important role in shaping Burden in this intergovernmental program. We conclude by sketching a research agenda centered on Administrative Burden.

  • Government Reform, Political Ideology, and Administrative Burden: The Case of Performance Management in the Bush Administration
    Public Administration Review, 2013
    Co-Authors: Stéphane Lavertu, David E. Lewis, Donald P. Moynihan

    Abstract:

    This article examines how ideological differences between political officials and agencies may have affected the implementation of an ostensibly nonpartisan, government-wide Administrative initiative: the George W. Bush administration’s Program Assessment Rating Tool (PART) review of federal programs. The analysis reveals that managers in agencies associated with liberal programs and employees (“liberal agencies”) agreed to a greater extent than those in agencies associated with conservative programs and employees (“conservative agencies”) that PART required significant agency time and effort and that it imposed a Burden on management resources. Further analysis reveals that differences in reported agency effort can be explained partly by objective differences in the demands that PART placed on agencies—liberal agencies were required to evaluate more programs and implement more improvement plans relative to their organizational capacity—and partly by the ideological beliefs of employees—on average, liberal managers reported more agency effort, even after accounting for objective measures of Administrative Burden.