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Administrative Record

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Marni Brownell – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Administrative Record linkage as a tool for public health research
    Annual Review of Public Health, 2011
    Co-Authors: Douglas P Jutte, Leslie L Roos, Marni Brownell

    Abstract:

    Linked Administrative databases offer a powerful resource for studying important public health issues. Methods developed and implemented in several jurisdictions across the globe have achieved high-quality linkages for conducting health and social research without compromising confidentiality. Key data available for linkage include health services utilization, population registries, place of residence, family ties, educational outcomes, and use of social services. Linking events for large populations of individuals across disparate sources and over time permits a range of research possibilities, including the capacity to study low-prevalence exposure-disease associations, multiple outcome domains within the same cohort of individuals, service utilization and chronic disease patterns, and life course and transgenerational transmission of health. Limited information on variables such as individual-level socioeconomic status (SES) and social supports is outweighed by strengths that include comprehensive foll…

Kenneth C. Schoendorf – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Concordance between survey report of Medicaid enrollment and linked Medicaid Administrative Records in two national studies.
    National health statistics reports, 2014
    Co-Authors: Lisa B. Mirel, Alan E. Simon, Cordell Golden, Catherine R. Duran, Kenneth C. Schoendorf

    Abstract:

    The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) and the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) are population-based surveys that have each been linked to Administrative data from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS): the Medicaid Analytic eXtract (MAX) files. These linked data were used to examine, among children under age 18 years, respondent-level concordance between Medicaid or the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) enrollment as reported in each survey (NHANES and NHIS) and as indicated by Administrative data from the MAX files. Concordance was defined as having Medicaid/CHIP reported as a health insurance source in the survey questionnaire and having a CMS Medicaid/CHIP Administrative Record in the same month and year as the interview. Records were also considered concordant if there was no report of Medicaid/CHIP coverage based on the interview response and no match to the CMS Administrative Records for Medicaid enrollment. Between NHANES and MAX, 88% of observations were concordant with respect to Medicaid or CHIP enrollment, yielding a Kappa of 0.71. Between NHIS and MAX, 89% of observations were concordant with respect to Medicaid or CHIP enrollment, yielding a Kappa of 0.73. These concordance rates provide support for the use of both Administrative and NHANES and NHIS as a valuable tool for public health researchers and survey methodologists.

Lei Meng – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Essays on rural -urban migration in hinterland China
    , 2009
    Co-Authors: Lei Meng

    Abstract:

    Using self-collected rural household data in Zhijiang municipality, Hubei province, China, my dissertation addresses three different aspects of rural-urban migration in hinterland China. First, I study the relationship between origin income and the individual’s migration decision. I instrument the key variable, the household land, using the Administrative Record of initial land allocated by the state to the households in the early 1980s, and find that rural-urban migration selects negatively on landholding. I also study individuals’ migration decisions that were not selected on the parental migration choices versus those that were. My findings show that the selectivity problem is important. While a negative relationship between landholding and migration propensity is found for the descendants of an immobile cohort of rural residents, selectivity alters the result for the descendants of a mobile cohort of villagers and a positive relationship can emerge. Second, I examine the causal impact of the grain subsidy, which was ushered in by China’s agricultural policy shift since 2004, on villagers’ urban-bound migration propensity. My study validates the concern that the grain subsidy is dissuading farmers to engage in migratory work, however, the magnitude of the reduced incidence of rural-urban migration is modest. If China values the welfare of the rural sector and would like to continue subsidizing its grain production in a WTO-compliant way, it can do so without jeopardizing the country’s process of rural-urban migration or notably reduce the local welfare that might result from a loss of the migrant income. Lastly, I focus on the fall of the marriage rates of rural men in their early twenties and study the extent to which the rise in rural young women’s participation in migratory work has contributed to this fall. I find that (1) a 10 percentage point increase in the local female out-migration reduces rural male marriage propensity by 5\%; (2) the impact was felt by both non-migrant and migrant men, but the marriage propensity of migrant men was affected more by female out- migration than non-migrant men; (3) the more educated the migrant men, the less severely their marriage probability was affected by the local female out-migration.

  • Essays on rural-urban migration in hinterland China – eScholarship
    , 2009
    Co-Authors: Lei Meng

    Abstract:

    Using self-collected rural household data in Zhijiang municipality, Hubei province, China, my dissertation addresses three different aspects of rural-urban migration in hinterland China. First, I study the relationship between origin income and the individual’s migration decision. I instrument the key variable, the household land, using the Administrative Record of initial land allocated by the state to the households in the early 1980s, and find that rural-urban migration selects negatively on landholding. I also study individuals’ migration decisions that were not selected on the parental migration choices versus those that were. My findings show that the selectivity problem is important. While a negative relationship between landholding and migration propensity is found for the descendants of an immobile cohort of rural residents, selectivity alters the result for the descendants of a mobile cohort of villagers and a positive relationship can emerge. Second, I examine the causal impact of the grain subsidy, which was ushered in by China’s agricultural policy shift since 2004, on villagers’ urban-bound migration propensity. My study validates the concern that the grain subsidy is dissuading farmers to engage in migratory work, however, the magnitude of the reduced incidence of rural-urban migration is modest. If China values the welfare of the rural sector and would like to continue subsidizing its grain production in a WTO-compliant way, it can do so without jeopardizing the country’s process of rural-urban migration or notably reduce the local welfare that might result from a loss of the migrant income. Lastly, I focus on the fall of the marriage rates of rural men in their early twenties and study the extent to which the rise in rural young women’s participation in migratory work has contributed to this fall. I find that (1) a 10 percentage point increase in the local female out-migration reduces rural male marriage propensity by 5\%; (2) the impact was felt by both non-migrant and migrant men, but the marriage propensity of migrant men was affected more by female out- migration than non-migrant men; (3) the more educated the migrant men, the less severely their marriage probability was affected by the local female out-migration.