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Li-fen Wang – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • VIETNAMESE FEMALE SPOUSES ’ LANGUAGE USE PATTERNS IN SELF INITIATED Admonishment SEQUENCES IN BILINGUAL TAIWANESE FAMILIES*
    , 2015
    Co-Authors: Li-fen Wang

    Abstract:

    Abstract: This paper aims to identify how Taiwanese and Mandarin (the two dominant languages in Taiwan) are used as interactional resources by Vietnamese female spouses in bilingual Taiwanese families. Three Vietnamese-Taiwanese transnational families (a total of seventeen people) participated in the research, and mealtime talks among the Vietnamese wives and their Taiwanese family members were audio-/video-recorded. Conversation analysis (CA) was adopted to analyse the seven hours of data collected. It was found that the Vietnamese participants orient to Taiwanese and Mandarin as salient resources in Admonishment sequences. Specifically, it was identified that the two languages serve as contextualisation cues and framing devices in the Vietnamese participants ’ self-initiated Admonishment sequences

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  • VIETNAMESE FEMALE SPOUSES’ LANGUAGE USE PATTERNS IN SELF INITIATED Admonishment SEQUENCES IN BILINGUAL TAIWANESE FAMILIES *
    , 2014
    Co-Authors: Li-fen Wang

    Abstract:

    This paper aims to identify how Taiwanese and Mandarin (the two dominant languages in Taiwan) are used as interactional resources by Vietnamese female spouses in bilingual Taiwanese families. Three Vietnamese-Taiwanese transnational families (a total of seventeen people) participated in the research, and mealtime talks among the Vietnamese wives and their Taiwanese family members were audio-/video-recorded. Conversation analysis (CA) was adopted to analyse the seven hours of data collected. It was found that the Vietnamese participants orient to Taiwanese and Mandarin as salient resources in Admonishment sequences. Specifically, it was identified that the two languages serve as contextualisation cues and framing devices in the Vietnamese participants’ self-initiated Admonishment sequences.

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  • vietnamese female spouses language use patterns in self initiated Admonishment sequences in bilingual taiwanese families
    Novitas-ROYAL (Research on Youth and Language), 2014
    Co-Authors: Li-fen Wang

    Abstract:

    This paper aims to identify how Taiwanese and Mandarin (the two dominant languages in Taiwan) are used as interactional resources by Vietnamese female spouses in bilingual Taiwanese families. Three Vietnamese-Taiwanese transnational families (a total of seventeen people) participated in the research, and mealtime talks among the Vietnamese wives and their Taiwanese family members were audio-/video-recorded. Conversation analysis (CA) was adopted to analyse the seven hours of data collected. It was found that the Vietnamese participants orient to Taiwanese and Mandarin as salient resources in Admonishment sequences. Specifically, it was identified that the two languages serve as contextualisation cues and framing devices in the Vietnamese participants’ self-initiated Admonishment sequences.

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Jonathan Potter – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Shaming interrogatives: Admonishments, the social psychology of emotion, and discursive practices of behaviour modification in family mealtimes.
    British Journal of Social Psychology, 2020
    Co-Authors: Jonathan Potter, Alexa Hepburn

    Abstract:

    This paper contributes to the study of Admonishments, the operation of shaming in family interaction, and more broadly presses the virtue of a discursive psychological reconsideration of the social psychology of emotion. It examines the methodological basis of contemporary research on shame in experimental and qualitative social psychology, illustrated through the Test of Self-Conscious Affect (TOSCA) and qualitative work using shame narratives. Doubts are raised about how these methods can throw light on shaming practices in natural situations. The study uses a collection of video recordings of family mealtimes, focusing on Admonishment sequences in which parents address the interrogatives ‘what are you doing’ or ‘what did I say’ to a ‘misbehaving’ child. Despite the interrogative syntax, rather than soliciting information we show that these interrogative forms pursue behaviour change by publicly highlighting both the problem behaviour and the child’s active and intentional production of that behaviour. This is the sense in which the practice can be understood as shaming. Although this practice prosecutes shaming, ways in which the children can ignore, push back, or rework parents’ actions are highlighted. This study contributes to a broader consideration of how enduring behavioural change can be approached as a parents’ project.

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  • threats power family mealtimes and social influence
    British Journal of Social Psychology, 2011
    Co-Authors: Alexa Hepburn, Jonathan Potter

    Abstract:

    One of the most basic topics in social psychology is the way one agent influences the behaviour of another. This paper will focus on threats, which are an intensified form of attempted behavioural influence. Despite the centrality to the project of social psychology, little attention has been paid to threats. This paper will start to rectify this oversight. It reviews early examples of the way social psychology handles threats and highlights key limitations and presuppositions about the nature and role of threats. By contrast, we subject them to a programme of empirical research. Data comprise video records of a collection of family mealtimes that include preschool children. Threats are recurrent in this material. A preliminary conceptualization of features of candidate threats from this corpus will be used as an analytic start point. A series of examples are used to explicate basic features and dimensions that build the action of threatening. The basic structure of the threats uses a conditional logic: if the recipient continues problem action/does not initiate required action then negative consequences will be produced by the speaker. Further analysis clarifies how threats differ from warnings and Admonishments. Sequential analysis suggests threats set up basic response options of compliance or defiance. However, recipients of threats can evade these options by, for example, reworking the unpleasant upshot specified in the threat, or producing barely minimal compliance. The implications for broader social psychological concerns are explored in a discussion of power, resistance, and asymmetry; the paper ends by reconsidering the way social influence can be studied in social psychology.

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Alexa Hepburn – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Shaming interrogatives: Admonishments, the social psychology of emotion, and discursive practices of behaviour modification in family mealtimes.
    British Journal of Social Psychology, 2020
    Co-Authors: Jonathan Potter, Alexa Hepburn

    Abstract:

    This paper contributes to the study of Admonishments, the operation of shaming in family interaction, and more broadly presses the virtue of a discursive psychological reconsideration of the social psychology of emotion. It examines the methodological basis of contemporary research on shame in experimental and qualitative social psychology, illustrated through the Test of Self-Conscious Affect (TOSCA) and qualitative work using shame narratives. Doubts are raised about how these methods can throw light on shaming practices in natural situations. The study uses a collection of video recordings of family mealtimes, focusing on Admonishment sequences in which parents address the interrogatives ‘what are you doing’ or ‘what did I say’ to a ‘misbehaving’ child. Despite the interrogative syntax, rather than soliciting information we show that these interrogative forms pursue behaviour change by publicly highlighting both the problem behaviour and the child’s active and intentional production of that behaviour. This is the sense in which the practice can be understood as shaming. Although this practice prosecutes shaming, ways in which the children can ignore, push back, or rework parents’ actions are highlighted. This study contributes to a broader consideration of how enduring behavioural change can be approached as a parents’ project.

    Free Register to Access Article

  • threats power family mealtimes and social influence
    British Journal of Social Psychology, 2011
    Co-Authors: Alexa Hepburn, Jonathan Potter

    Abstract:

    One of the most basic topics in social psychology is the way one agent influences the behaviour of another. This paper will focus on threats, which are an intensified form of attempted behavioural influence. Despite the centrality to the project of social psychology, little attention has been paid to threats. This paper will start to rectify this oversight. It reviews early examples of the way social psychology handles threats and highlights key limitations and presuppositions about the nature and role of threats. By contrast, we subject them to a programme of empirical research. Data comprise video records of a collection of family mealtimes that include preschool children. Threats are recurrent in this material. A preliminary conceptualization of features of candidate threats from this corpus will be used as an analytic start point. A series of examples are used to explicate basic features and dimensions that build the action of threatening. The basic structure of the threats uses a conditional logic: if the recipient continues problem action/does not initiate required action then negative consequences will be produced by the speaker. Further analysis clarifies how threats differ from warnings and Admonishments. Sequential analysis suggests threats set up basic response options of compliance or defiance. However, recipients of threats can evade these options by, for example, reworking the unpleasant upshot specified in the threat, or producing barely minimal compliance. The implications for broader social psychological concerns are explored in a discussion of power, resistance, and asymmetry; the paper ends by reconsidering the way social influence can be studied in social psychology.

    Free Register to Access Article