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Aaron Hogue – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Benchmarking Family Therapy for Adolescent Behavior Problems in Usual Care: Fidelity, Outcomes, and Therapist Performance Differences
    Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research, 2017
    Co-Authors: Aaron Hogue, Sarah Dauber, Craig E. Henderson

    Abstract:

    This study evaluated whether community therapists delivering family therapy for Adolescent Behavior problems in usual care achieved performance benchmarks established in controlled trials for treatment fidelity and outcomes, with particular focus on individual differences in therapist performance. The study contained N = 38 Adolescents (50 % male; mean age 15 years) whose self-reported race/ethnicity was Hispanic (74 %), African American (11 %), multiracial (11 %), and other (4 %). Clients were treated by 13 therapists in one community mental health clinic that delivered family therapy as the routine standard of care. Therapists provided self-report data on adherence to core family therapy techniques; these scores were inflation-adjusted based on concordance with observer reports. Results showed that community therapists surpassed the fidelity benchmark for core family therapy techniques established by research therapists during a controlled trial. Regarding change in client functioning at 6-month follow-up, community therapists were equivalent to the benchmark for internalizing symptoms and superior for externalizing symptoms and delinquent acts. Community therapists also demonstrated a high degree of performance uniformity: Each one approximated the fidelity benchmark, and only two produced relatively weak outcomes on any of the client change indicators. Caveats for interpreting therapist performance data, given the small sample size, are described. Recommendations are made for developing therapist-report fidelity measures and utilizing statistical process control methods to diagnose therapist differences and enhance quality assurance procedures.

  • Therapist Self-Report of Evidence-Based Practices in Usual Care for Adolescent Behavior Problems: Factor and Construct Validity
    Administration and policy in mental health, 2012
    Co-Authors: Aaron Hogue, Sarah Dauber, Craig E. Henderson

    Abstract:

    This study introduces a therapist-report measure of evidence-based practices for Adolescent conduct and substance use problems. The Inventory of Therapy Techniques—Adolescent Behavior Problems (ITT-ABP) is a post-session measure of 27 techniques representing four approaches: cognitive-Behavioral therapy (CBT), family therapy (FT), motivational interviewing (MI), and drug counseling (DC). A total of 822 protocols were collected from 32 therapists treating 71 Adolescents in six usual care sites. Factor analyses identified three clinically coherent scales with strong internal consistency across the full sample: FT (8 items; α = .79), MI/CBT (8 items; α = .87), and DC (9 items, α = .90). The scales discriminated between therapists working in a family-oriented site versus other sites and showed moderate convergent validity with therapist reports of allegiance and skill in each approach. The ITT-ABP holds promise as a cost-efficient quality assurance tool for supporting high-fidelity delivery of evidence-based practices in usual care.

  • treatment adherence competence and outcome in individual and family therapy for Adolescent Behavior problems
    Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 2008
    Co-Authors: Aaron Hogue, Craig E. Henderson, Sarah Dauber, Priscilla C Barajas, Adam L Fried, Howard A Liddle

    Abstract:

    This study examined the impact of treatment adherence and therapist competence on treatment outcome in a controlled trial of individual cognitive–Behavioral therapy (CBT) and multidimensional family therapy (MDFT) for Adolescent substance use and related Behavior problems. Participants included 136 Adolescents (62 CBT, 74 MDFT) assessed at intake, discharge, and 6-month follow-up. Observational ratings of adherence and competence were collected on early and later phases of treatment (192 CBT sessions, 245 MDFT sessions) by using a contextual measure of treatment fidelity. Adherence and competence effects were tested after controlling for therapeutic alliance. In CBT only, stronger adherence predicted greater declines in drug use (linear effect). In CBT and MDFT, (a) stronger adherence predicted greater reductions in externalizing Behaviors (linear effect) and (b) intermediate levels of adherence predicted the largest declines in internalizing Behaviors, with high and low adherence predicting smaller improvements (curvilinear effect). Therapist competence did not predict outcome and did not moderate adherence–outcome relations; however, competence findings are tentative due to relatively low interrater reliability for the competence ratings. Clinical and research implications for attending to both linear and curvilinear adherence effects in manualized treatments for Behavior disorders are discussed.

Craig E. Henderson – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Benchmarking Family Therapy for Adolescent Behavior Problems in Usual Care: Fidelity, Outcomes, and Therapist Performance Differences
    Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research, 2017
    Co-Authors: Aaron Hogue, Sarah Dauber, Craig E. Henderson

    Abstract:

    This study evaluated whether community therapists delivering family therapy for Adolescent Behavior problems in usual care achieved performance benchmarks established in controlled trials for treatment fidelity and outcomes, with particular focus on individual differences in therapist performance. The study contained N = 38 Adolescents (50 % male; mean age 15 years) whose self-reported race/ethnicity was Hispanic (74 %), African American (11 %), multiracial (11 %), and other (4 %). Clients were treated by 13 therapists in one community mental health clinic that delivered family therapy as the routine standard of care. Therapists provided self-report data on adherence to core family therapy techniques; these scores were inflation-adjusted based on concordance with observer reports. Results showed that community therapists surpassed the fidelity benchmark for core family therapy techniques established by research therapists during a controlled trial. Regarding change in client functioning at 6-month follow-up, community therapists were equivalent to the benchmark for internalizing symptoms and superior for externalizing symptoms and delinquent acts. Community therapists also demonstrated a high degree of performance uniformity: Each one approximated the fidelity benchmark, and only two produced relatively weak outcomes on any of the client change indicators. Caveats for interpreting therapist performance data, given the small sample size, are described. Recommendations are made for developing therapist-report fidelity measures and utilizing statistical process control methods to diagnose therapist differences and enhance quality assurance procedures.

  • Therapist Self-Report of Evidence-Based Practices in Usual Care for Adolescent Behavior Problems: Factor and Construct Validity
    Administration and policy in mental health, 2012
    Co-Authors: Aaron Hogue, Sarah Dauber, Craig E. Henderson

    Abstract:

    This study introduces a therapist-report measure of evidence-based practices for Adolescent conduct and substance use problems. The Inventory of Therapy Techniques—Adolescent Behavior Problems (ITT-ABP) is a post-session measure of 27 techniques representing four approaches: cognitive-Behavioral therapy (CBT), family therapy (FT), motivational interviewing (MI), and drug counseling (DC). A total of 822 protocols were collected from 32 therapists treating 71 Adolescents in six usual care sites. Factor analyses identified three clinically coherent scales with strong internal consistency across the full sample: FT (8 items; α = .79), MI/CBT (8 items; α = .87), and DC (9 items, α = .90). The scales discriminated between therapists working in a family-oriented site versus other sites and showed moderate convergent validity with therapist reports of allegiance and skill in each approach. The ITT-ABP holds promise as a cost-efficient quality assurance tool for supporting high-fidelity delivery of evidence-based practices in usual care.

  • treatment adherence competence and outcome in individual and family therapy for Adolescent Behavior problems
    Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 2008
    Co-Authors: Aaron Hogue, Craig E. Henderson, Sarah Dauber, Priscilla C Barajas, Adam L Fried, Howard A Liddle

    Abstract:

    This study examined the impact of treatment adherence and therapist competence on treatment outcome in a controlled trial of individual cognitive–Behavioral therapy (CBT) and multidimensional family therapy (MDFT) for Adolescent substance use and related Behavior problems. Participants included 136 Adolescents (62 CBT, 74 MDFT) assessed at intake, discharge, and 6-month follow-up. Observational ratings of adherence and competence were collected on early and later phases of treatment (192 CBT sessions, 245 MDFT sessions) by using a contextual measure of treatment fidelity. Adherence and competence effects were tested after controlling for therapeutic alliance. In CBT only, stronger adherence predicted greater declines in drug use (linear effect). In CBT and MDFT, (a) stronger adherence predicted greater reductions in externalizing Behaviors (linear effect) and (b) intermediate levels of adherence predicted the largest declines in internalizing Behaviors, with high and low adherence predicting smaller improvements (curvilinear effect). Therapist competence did not predict outcome and did not moderate adherence–outcome relations; however, competence findings are tentative due to relatively low interrater reliability for the competence ratings. Clinical and research implications for attending to both linear and curvilinear adherence effects in manualized treatments for Behavior disorders are discussed.

Sarah Dauber – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Benchmarking Family Therapy for Adolescent Behavior Problems in Usual Care: Fidelity, Outcomes, and Therapist Performance Differences
    Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research, 2017
    Co-Authors: Aaron Hogue, Sarah Dauber, Craig E. Henderson

    Abstract:

    This study evaluated whether community therapists delivering family therapy for Adolescent Behavior problems in usual care achieved performance benchmarks established in controlled trials for treatment fidelity and outcomes, with particular focus on individual differences in therapist performance. The study contained N = 38 Adolescents (50 % male; mean age 15 years) whose self-reported race/ethnicity was Hispanic (74 %), African American (11 %), multiracial (11 %), and other (4 %). Clients were treated by 13 therapists in one community mental health clinic that delivered family therapy as the routine standard of care. Therapists provided self-report data on adherence to core family therapy techniques; these scores were inflation-adjusted based on concordance with observer reports. Results showed that community therapists surpassed the fidelity benchmark for core family therapy techniques established by research therapists during a controlled trial. Regarding change in client functioning at 6-month follow-up, community therapists were equivalent to the benchmark for internalizing symptoms and superior for externalizing symptoms and delinquent acts. Community therapists also demonstrated a high degree of performance uniformity: Each one approximated the fidelity benchmark, and only two produced relatively weak outcomes on any of the client change indicators. Caveats for interpreting therapist performance data, given the small sample size, are described. Recommendations are made for developing therapist-report fidelity measures and utilizing statistical process control methods to diagnose therapist differences and enhance quality assurance procedures.

  • Therapist Self-Report of Evidence-Based Practices in Usual Care for Adolescent Behavior Problems: Factor and Construct Validity
    Administration and policy in mental health, 2012
    Co-Authors: Aaron Hogue, Sarah Dauber, Craig E. Henderson

    Abstract:

    This study introduces a therapist-report measure of evidence-based practices for Adolescent conduct and substance use problems. The Inventory of Therapy Techniques—Adolescent Behavior Problems (ITT-ABP) is a post-session measure of 27 techniques representing four approaches: cognitive-Behavioral therapy (CBT), family therapy (FT), motivational interviewing (MI), and drug counseling (DC). A total of 822 protocols were collected from 32 therapists treating 71 Adolescents in six usual care sites. Factor analyses identified three clinically coherent scales with strong internal consistency across the full sample: FT (8 items; α = .79), MI/CBT (8 items; α = .87), and DC (9 items, α = .90). The scales discriminated between therapists working in a family-oriented site versus other sites and showed moderate convergent validity with therapist reports of allegiance and skill in each approach. The ITT-ABP holds promise as a cost-efficient quality assurance tool for supporting high-fidelity delivery of evidence-based practices in usual care.

  • treatment adherence competence and outcome in individual and family therapy for Adolescent Behavior problems
    Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 2008
    Co-Authors: Aaron Hogue, Craig E. Henderson, Sarah Dauber, Priscilla C Barajas, Adam L Fried, Howard A Liddle

    Abstract:

    This study examined the impact of treatment adherence and therapist competence on treatment outcome in a controlled trial of individual cognitive–Behavioral therapy (CBT) and multidimensional family therapy (MDFT) for Adolescent substance use and related Behavior problems. Participants included 136 Adolescents (62 CBT, 74 MDFT) assessed at intake, discharge, and 6-month follow-up. Observational ratings of adherence and competence were collected on early and later phases of treatment (192 CBT sessions, 245 MDFT sessions) by using a contextual measure of treatment fidelity. Adherence and competence effects were tested after controlling for therapeutic alliance. In CBT only, stronger adherence predicted greater declines in drug use (linear effect). In CBT and MDFT, (a) stronger adherence predicted greater reductions in externalizing Behaviors (linear effect) and (b) intermediate levels of adherence predicted the largest declines in internalizing Behaviors, with high and low adherence predicting smaller improvements (curvilinear effect). Therapist competence did not predict outcome and did not moderate adherence–outcome relations; however, competence findings are tentative due to relatively low interrater reliability for the competence ratings. Clinical and research implications for attending to both linear and curvilinear adherence effects in manualized treatments for Behavior disorders are discussed.