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Adolescent Obesity

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Suzanne Munson – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Psychiatric Aspects of Child and Adolescent Obesity
    FOCUS, 2004
    Co-Authors: Alan J. Zametkin, Christine K. Zoon, Hannah W. Klein, Suzanne Munson
    Abstract:

    Objective: To review the past 10 years of published research on psychiatric aspects of child and Adolescent Obesity and highlight information mental health professionals need for preventing Obesity in youths and diagnosing and treating it. Method: Researchers performed computerized and manual searches of the literature and summarized the most relevant articles. Results: The growing epidemic of child and Adolescent Obesity deserves attention for its immediate mental health and long-term medical complications. Mental health professionals working with obese youths should be aware of recent advances in neuroscience, genetics, and etiologies associated with Obesity. Those who assess and treat obese youth should view Obesity as a chronic disease. Currently, no approved pharmacological or surgical approaches exist to treat childhood Obesity. Conclusions: Health care providers should focus on modest weight-loss goals that correlate with significant health benefits. The most effective treatments include substantia…

  • Psychiatric Aspects of Child and Adolescent Obesity: A Review of the Past 10 Years
    Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 2004
    Co-Authors: Alan J. Zametkin, Christine K. Zoon, Hannah W. Klein, Suzanne Munson
    Abstract:

    ABSTRACT Objective To review the past 10 years of published research on psychiatric aspects of child and Adolescent Obesity and highlight information mental health professionals need for preventing Obesity in youths and diagnosing and treating it. Method Researchers performed computerized and manual searches of the literature and summarized the most relevant articles. Results The growing epidemic of child and Adolescent Obesity deserves attention for its immediate mental health and long-term medical complications. Mental health professionals working with obese youths should be aware of recent advances in neuroscience, genetics, and etiologies associated with Obesity. Those who assess and treat obese youth should view Obesity as a chronic disease. Currently, no approved pharmacological or surgical approaches exist to treat childhood Obesity. Conclusions Health care providers should focus on modest weight-loss goals that correlate with significant health benefits. The most effective treatments include substantial parental involvement. Mental health professionals should help obese children build self-esteem to help them lead full lives regardless of weight.

Joey C Eisenmann – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • the cumulative impact of physical activity sleep duration and television time on Adolescent Obesity 2011 youth risk behavior survey
    Journal of Physical Activity and Health, 2015
    Co-Authors: Kelly R Laurson, Joey A Lee, Joey C Eisenmann
    Abstract:

    Background: Physical activity (PA), television time (TV), and sleep duration (SLP) are considered individual risk factors for Adolescent Obesity. Our aim was to investigate the concurrent influence of meeting PA, SLP, and TV recommendations on Adolescent Obesity utilizing 2011 Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance Survey (YRBSS) data. Methods: Subjects included 9589 (4874 females) high school students. PA, SLP, and TV were categorized utilizing established national recommendations and youth were cross-tabulated into 1 of 8 groups based on meeting or not meeting each recommendation. Logistic models were used to examine the odds of Obesity for each group. Results: Youth meeting the PA recommendation were not at increased odds of Obesity, regardless of SLP or TV status. However, not meeting any single recommendation, in general, led to increased odds of not meeting the other two. In boys, 11.8% met all recommendations while 14.1% met 0 recommendations. In girls, only 5.0% met all recommendations while 17.8% met n…

Louise A. Baur – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Treatment of Adolescent Obesity
    Nature reviews. Endocrinology, 2018
    Co-Authors: Katharine Steinbeck, Natalie B. Lister, Megan L. Gow, Louise A. Baur
    Abstract:

    The increased prevalence of Adolescent Obesity and associated short-term and long-term complications emphasize the need for effective treatment. In this Review, we aim to describe the evidence for, and elements of, behaviour management and adjunctive therapies and highlight the opportunities and challenges presented by Obesity management in adolescence. The broad principles of treatment include management of Obesity-associated complications; a developmentally appropriate approach; long-term behaviour modification (dietary change, increased physical activity, decreased sedentary behaviours and improved sleep patterns); long-term weight maintenance strategies; and consideration of the use of pharmacotherapy, more intensive dietary therapies and bariatric surgery. Bariatric surgery should be considered in those with severe Obesity and be undertaken by skilled bariatric surgeons affiliated with teams experienced in the medical and psychosocial management of Adolescents. Adolescent Obesity management strategies are more reliant on active participation than those for childhood Obesity and should recognize the emerging autonomy of the patient. The challenges in Adolescent Obesity relate primarily to the often competing demands of developing autonomy and not yet having attained neurocognitive maturity.

  • Transition to adult care in Adolescent Obesity: a systematic review and why it is a neglected topic
    International journal of obesity (2005), 2013
    Co-Authors: Vanessa A. Shrewsbury, Louise A. Baur, Binh Nguyen, Katharine Steinbeck
    Abstract:

    Transition to adult care in Adolescent Obesity: a systematic review and why it is a neglected topic

  • Adolescent Obesity: making a difference to the epidemic.
    International journal of adolescent medicine and health, 2007
    Co-Authors: Elizabeth Denney-wilson, Louise A. Baur
    Abstract:

    Adolescent Obesity is a major public health problem in Australia, and in many other parts of the world. Recent data suggest that as many as one quarter of young people in Australia are either overweight or obese, and that the majority of obese young people have one or more risk factors for chronic disease. Efforts to reduce the health and economic burden of Obesity must focus on both management of affected individuals and prevention of further cases. This paper reviews some of the research currently underway in Australia, and includes recent data on both the prevalence of Obesity and the associated complications, from large surveys and smaller cohorts. State and Federal governments have developed policies aimed at Obesity prevention, but these are yet to be fully evaluated. Two large-scale community-based interventions are underway, one of which has reported positive preliminary findings. A number of smaller research programs are examining macro and individual level causation of Obesity and include unique research examining the way Adolescents perceive their environment. Other research includes the development and evaluation of service delivery models specifically targeting Adolescents. A greater emphasis on environmental determinants and management of Adolescent Obesity is needed in future programs.

Janet Audrainmcgovern – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • sleep duration and Adolescent Obesity
    Pediatrics, 2013
    Co-Authors: Jonathan A Mitchell, Daniel Rodriguez, Kathryn H Schmitz, Janet Audrainmcgovern
    Abstract:

    OBJECTIVES: Short sleep has been associated with Adolescent Obesity. Most studies used a cross-sectional design and modeled BMI categories. We sought to determine if sleep duration was associated with BMI distribution changes from age 14 to 18. METHODS: Adolescents were recruited from suburban high schools in Philadelphia when entering ninth grade ( n = 1390) and were followed-up every 6 months through 12th grade. Height and weight were self-reported, and BMIs were calculated (kg/m 2 ). Hours of sleep were self-reported. Quantile regression was used to model the 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, and 90th BMI percentiles as dependent variables; study wave and sleep were the main predictors. RESULTS: BMI increased from age 14 to 18, with the largest increase observed at the 90th BMI percentile. Each additional hour of sleep was associated with decreases in BMI at the 10th (–0.04; 95% confidence interval [CI]: –0.11, 0.03), 25th (–0.12; 95% CI: –0.20, –0.04), 50th (–0.15; 95% CI: –0.24, –0.06), 75th (–0.25; 95% CI: –0.38, –0.12), and 90th (–0.27; 95% CI: -0.45, -0.09) BMI percentiles. The strength of the association was stronger at the upper tail of the BMI distribution. Increasing sleep from 7.5 to 10.0 hours per day at age 18 predicted a reduction in the proportion of Adolescents >25 kg/m 2 by 4%. CONCLUSIONS: More sleep was associated with nonuniform changes in BMI distribution from age 14 to 18. Increasing sleep among Adolescents, especially those in the upper half of the BMI distribution, may help prevent overweight and Obesity.

Alan J. Zametkin – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Psychiatric Aspects of Child and Adolescent Obesity
    FOCUS, 2004
    Co-Authors: Alan J. Zametkin, Christine K. Zoon, Hannah W. Klein, Suzanne Munson
    Abstract:

    Objective: To review the past 10 years of published research on psychiatric aspects of child and Adolescent Obesity and highlight information mental health professionals need for preventing Obesity in youths and diagnosing and treating it. Method: Researchers performed computerized and manual searches of the literature and summarized the most relevant articles. Results: The growing epidemic of child and Adolescent Obesity deserves attention for its immediate mental health and long-term medical complications. Mental health professionals working with obese youths should be aware of recent advances in neuroscience, genetics, and etiologies associated with Obesity. Those who assess and treat obese youth should view Obesity as a chronic disease. Currently, no approved pharmacological or surgical approaches exist to treat childhood Obesity. Conclusions: Health care providers should focus on modest weight-loss goals that correlate with significant health benefits. The most effective treatments include substantia…

  • Psychiatric of Child and Adolescent Obesity: of the Past 10 Years
    , 2004
    Co-Authors: Alan J. Zametkin, Christine K. Zoon, W. Klein
    Abstract:

    Objective: To review the past 10 years of published research on psychiatric aspects of child and Adolescent Obesity and highlight information mental health professionals need for preventing Obesity in youths and diagnosing and treating it. Method: Researchers performed computerized and manual searches of the literature and summarized the most relevant articles. Results: The growing epidemic of child and Adolescent Obesity deserves attention for its immediate mental health and long-term medical complications. Mental health professionals working with obese youths should be aware of recent advances in neuroscience, genetics, and etiologies associated with Obesity. Those who assess and treat obese youth should view Obesity as a chronic disease. Currently, no approved pharmacological or surgical approaches exist to treat childhood Obesity. Conclusions: Health care providers should focus on modest weight-loss goals that correlate with significant health benefits. The most effective treatments include substantial parental involvement. Mental health professionals should help obese children build self-esteem to help them lead full lives regardless of weight.

  • Psychiatric Aspects of Child and Adolescent Obesity: A Review of the Past 10 Years
    Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 2004
    Co-Authors: Alan J. Zametkin, Christine K. Zoon, Hannah W. Klein, Suzanne Munson
    Abstract:

    ABSTRACT Objective To review the past 10 years of published research on psychiatric aspects of child and Adolescent Obesity and highlight information mental health professionals need for preventing Obesity in youths and diagnosing and treating it. Method Researchers performed computerized and manual searches of the literature and summarized the most relevant articles. Results The growing epidemic of child and Adolescent Obesity deserves attention for its immediate mental health and long-term medical complications. Mental health professionals working with obese youths should be aware of recent advances in neuroscience, genetics, and etiologies associated with Obesity. Those who assess and treat obese youth should view Obesity as a chronic disease. Currently, no approved pharmacological or surgical approaches exist to treat childhood Obesity. Conclusions Health care providers should focus on modest weight-loss goals that correlate with significant health benefits. The most effective treatments include substantial parental involvement. Mental health professionals should help obese children build self-esteem to help them lead full lives regardless of weight.