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Achilles Anagnostopoulos – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • allografted recipients immunized against hepatitis b virus are at high risk of gradual surface antibody hbsab disappearance post transplant regardless of Adoptive Immunity transfer
    Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, 2007
    Co-Authors: Panayotis Kaloyannidis, Evangelia Yannaki, Ioannis Batsis, Despoina Adamidou, Demetrios Bartzoudis, Maria Papathanasiou, Despoina Mallouri, Ioanna Sakellari, Athanasios Fassas, Achilles Anagnostopoulos
    Abstract:

    Abstract Immunized against hepatitis B virus (HBV) recipients are at risk of developing HBV postallogeneic stem cell transplantation because of the potential loss of their HBV Immunity. The aim of the study was to evaluate: (1) the HbsAb eradication incidence posttransplant and potential risk factors, (2) the impact of donor’s Immunity on HbsAb loss, (3) the incidence of hepatitis B in patients with HbsAb disappearance. We studied, retrospectively, in 26 vaccinated and 56 naturally immunized recipients, the posttransplant HbsAb titers for a median period of 36 (6-132) months. The probability of HbsAb loss and HBV-related hepatitis was determined in all recipients. The impact of donor’s Immunity origin in the HBsAb disappearance was evaluated in the subgroup of, actively or naturally, immunized recipients/donors pairs. The 5-year probability of HbsAb disappearance was 90% for all patients with 18% probability of developing hepatitis at 12 years, for those who lost HbsAb. Marrow graft, antithymocyte globulin administration, age

  • Immunized Against Hepatitis B Virus Allografted Recipients Are at High Risk for Gradual Surface Antibody (HbsAb) Disappearance Post Transplant, Regardless of Adoptive Immunity Transfer: A Study of 82 Allografted Long Term Survivors.
    Blood, 2006
    Co-Authors: Panayotis Kaloyannidis, Evangelia Yannaki, Ioannis Batsis, Despoina Adamidou, Demetrios Bartzoudis, Maria Papathanasiou, Despoina Mallouri, Ioanna Sakellari, Athanasios Fassas, Achilles Anagnostopoulos
    Abstract:

    The presence of Hepatitis-B virus(HBV) surface antibody(HbsAb) is a strong indicator for the existence of HBV-Immunity. Immunosuppressed allografted recipients are at risk of developing HBV hepatitis due to the potential loss of their Immunity against HBV. The primary aim of the present study was to evaluate the incidence of HbsAb eradication post allo-transplantation, the potential risk factors and the impact of Adoptive Immunity transfer in the HbsAb loss. Additionally, to estimate the cumulative incidence of HBV infection in patients (pts) with HbsAb disappearance. Eighty-two immunized recipients aged 27(14–54) years and their donors were retrospectively studied. Fifty-six pts were naturally immunized while 26 were vaccinated. The median follow-up period was 36(6–132) months. Seventy-two were transplanted from siblings (4 with 1 Ag mismatch). Seven donors were matched unrelated volunteers, 2 were twins and 1 was haploidentical. Eighty-one pts received myeloablative conditioning. Marrow (BM) was infused in 23 pts, peripheral stem cells (PBSC) in 58 and BM plus PBSC in 1, with a median number of CD34:4,45×10 6 /Kg, CD3:2,77×10 8 /Kg, CD4:1,16×10 8 /Kg, CD8: 1,06×10 8 /Kg. Antithymocyte globulin (ATG) was administered to 15 and steroids to 54 pts. Thirty pts developed acute and 71 chronic graft versus host disease (cGVHD). Forty-six donors were non-immunized, 19 vaccinated and 13 naturally immunized. Data on Immunity origin were missing for 4 donors. HbsAb disappearance was observed in 39/82 pts, 24(6–60) months post transplant with a probability of loss 90% at 5 years. Multivariate analysis revealed as significant risk factors for HbsAb loss the BM graft, ATG administration, age ( p :0,06). Among the 39 pts who lost Immunity, 6 developed hepatitisB. All had a previous natural Immunity. Four had been transplanted from non-immunized and 2 from naturally immunized donors and all had been treated or were on intensive therapy for refractory cGvHD. The probability for HBV infection for pts who lost the HbsAb, regardless of Immunity origin, was 18% at 12 years. Six of 28 naturally immunized pts who lost the HbsAb developed hepatitis. In this cohort of pts the probability of HBV reactivation was estimated to be 26% at 12 years. In our study, the majority of pts lost their pre-transplant protection against HBV while the Adoptive transfer of Immunity, although established, didn’t offer long-lasting protection. As the possibility of hepatitisB is not negligible, serial serological monitoring and timely vaccination schedule for re-immunization in the early but also in the late post transplant period, might be necessary for patients with low or decreasing HbsAb titers.

Panayotis Kaloyannidis – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • allografted recipients immunized against hepatitis b virus are at high risk of gradual surface antibody hbsab disappearance post transplant regardless of Adoptive Immunity transfer
    Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, 2007
    Co-Authors: Panayotis Kaloyannidis, Evangelia Yannaki, Ioannis Batsis, Despoina Adamidou, Demetrios Bartzoudis, Maria Papathanasiou, Despoina Mallouri, Ioanna Sakellari, Athanasios Fassas, Achilles Anagnostopoulos
    Abstract:

    Abstract Immunized against hepatitis B virus (HBV) recipients are at risk of developing HBV postallogeneic stem cell transplantation because of the potential loss of their HBV Immunity. The aim of the study was to evaluate: (1) the HbsAb eradication incidence posttransplant and potential risk factors, (2) the impact of donor’s Immunity on HbsAb loss, (3) the incidence of hepatitis B in patients with HbsAb disappearance. We studied, retrospectively, in 26 vaccinated and 56 naturally immunized recipients, the posttransplant HbsAb titers for a median period of 36 (6-132) months. The probability of HbsAb loss and HBV-related hepatitis was determined in all recipients. The impact of donor’s Immunity origin in the HBsAb disappearance was evaluated in the subgroup of, actively or naturally, immunized recipients/donors pairs. The 5-year probability of HbsAb disappearance was 90% for all patients with 18% probability of developing hepatitis at 12 years, for those who lost HbsAb. Marrow graft, antithymocyte globulin administration, age

  • Immunized Against Hepatitis B Virus Allografted Recipients Are at High Risk for Gradual Surface Antibody (HbsAb) Disappearance Post Transplant, Regardless of Adoptive Immunity Transfer: A Study of 82 Allografted Long Term Survivors.
    Blood, 2006
    Co-Authors: Panayotis Kaloyannidis, Evangelia Yannaki, Ioannis Batsis, Despoina Adamidou, Demetrios Bartzoudis, Maria Papathanasiou, Despoina Mallouri, Ioanna Sakellari, Athanasios Fassas, Achilles Anagnostopoulos
    Abstract:

    The presence of Hepatitis-B virus(HBV) surface antibody(HbsAb) is a strong indicator for the existence of HBV-Immunity. Immunosuppressed allografted recipients are at risk of developing HBV hepatitis due to the potential loss of their Immunity against HBV. The primary aim of the present study was to evaluate the incidence of HbsAb eradication post allo-transplantation, the potential risk factors and the impact of Adoptive Immunity transfer in the HbsAb loss. Additionally, to estimate the cumulative incidence of HBV infection in patients (pts) with HbsAb disappearance. Eighty-two immunized recipients aged 27(14–54) years and their donors were retrospectively studied. Fifty-six pts were naturally immunized while 26 were vaccinated. The median follow-up period was 36(6–132) months. Seventy-two were transplanted from siblings (4 with 1 Ag mismatch). Seven donors were matched unrelated volunteers, 2 were twins and 1 was haploidentical. Eighty-one pts received myeloablative conditioning. Marrow (BM) was infused in 23 pts, peripheral stem cells (PBSC) in 58 and BM plus PBSC in 1, with a median number of CD34:4,45×10 6 /Kg, CD3:2,77×10 8 /Kg, CD4:1,16×10 8 /Kg, CD8: 1,06×10 8 /Kg. Antithymocyte globulin (ATG) was administered to 15 and steroids to 54 pts. Thirty pts developed acute and 71 chronic graft versus host disease (cGVHD). Forty-six donors were non-immunized, 19 vaccinated and 13 naturally immunized. Data on Immunity origin were missing for 4 donors. HbsAb disappearance was observed in 39/82 pts, 24(6–60) months post transplant with a probability of loss 90% at 5 years. Multivariate analysis revealed as significant risk factors for HbsAb loss the BM graft, ATG administration, age ( p :0,06). Among the 39 pts who lost Immunity, 6 developed hepatitisB. All had a previous natural Immunity. Four had been transplanted from non-immunized and 2 from naturally immunized donors and all had been treated or were on intensive therapy for refractory cGvHD. The probability for HBV infection for pts who lost the HbsAb, regardless of Immunity origin, was 18% at 12 years. Six of 28 naturally immunized pts who lost the HbsAb developed hepatitis. In this cohort of pts the probability of HBV reactivation was estimated to be 26% at 12 years. In our study, the majority of pts lost their pre-transplant protection against HBV while the Adoptive transfer of Immunity, although established, didn’t offer long-lasting protection. As the possibility of hepatitisB is not negligible, serial serological monitoring and timely vaccination schedule for re-immunization in the early but also in the late post transplant period, might be necessary for patients with low or decreasing HbsAb titers.

Hiromitsu Saisho – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

Evangelia Yannaki – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • allografted recipients immunized against hepatitis b virus are at high risk of gradual surface antibody hbsab disappearance post transplant regardless of Adoptive Immunity transfer
    Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, 2007
    Co-Authors: Panayotis Kaloyannidis, Evangelia Yannaki, Ioannis Batsis, Despoina Adamidou, Demetrios Bartzoudis, Maria Papathanasiou, Despoina Mallouri, Ioanna Sakellari, Athanasios Fassas, Achilles Anagnostopoulos
    Abstract:

    Abstract Immunized against hepatitis B virus (HBV) recipients are at risk of developing HBV postallogeneic stem cell transplantation because of the potential loss of their HBV Immunity. The aim of the study was to evaluate: (1) the HbsAb eradication incidence posttransplant and potential risk factors, (2) the impact of donor’s Immunity on HbsAb loss, (3) the incidence of hepatitis B in patients with HbsAb disappearance. We studied, retrospectively, in 26 vaccinated and 56 naturally immunized recipients, the posttransplant HbsAb titers for a median period of 36 (6-132) months. The probability of HbsAb loss and HBV-related hepatitis was determined in all recipients. The impact of donor’s Immunity origin in the HBsAb disappearance was evaluated in the subgroup of, actively or naturally, immunized recipients/donors pairs. The 5-year probability of HbsAb disappearance was 90% for all patients with 18% probability of developing hepatitis at 12 years, for those who lost HbsAb. Marrow graft, antithymocyte globulin administration, age

  • Immunized Against Hepatitis B Virus Allografted Recipients Are at High Risk for Gradual Surface Antibody (HbsAb) Disappearance Post Transplant, Regardless of Adoptive Immunity Transfer: A Study of 82 Allografted Long Term Survivors.
    Blood, 2006
    Co-Authors: Panayotis Kaloyannidis, Evangelia Yannaki, Ioannis Batsis, Despoina Adamidou, Demetrios Bartzoudis, Maria Papathanasiou, Despoina Mallouri, Ioanna Sakellari, Athanasios Fassas, Achilles Anagnostopoulos
    Abstract:

    The presence of Hepatitis-B virus(HBV) surface antibody(HbsAb) is a strong indicator for the existence of HBV-Immunity. Immunosuppressed allografted recipients are at risk of developing HBV hepatitis due to the potential loss of their Immunity against HBV. The primary aim of the present study was to evaluate the incidence of HbsAb eradication post allo-transplantation, the potential risk factors and the impact of Adoptive Immunity transfer in the HbsAb loss. Additionally, to estimate the cumulative incidence of HBV infection in patients (pts) with HbsAb disappearance. Eighty-two immunized recipients aged 27(14–54) years and their donors were retrospectively studied. Fifty-six pts were naturally immunized while 26 were vaccinated. The median follow-up period was 36(6–132) months. Seventy-two were transplanted from siblings (4 with 1 Ag mismatch). Seven donors were matched unrelated volunteers, 2 were twins and 1 was haploidentical. Eighty-one pts received myeloablative conditioning. Marrow (BM) was infused in 23 pts, peripheral stem cells (PBSC) in 58 and BM plus PBSC in 1, with a median number of CD34:4,45×10 6 /Kg, CD3:2,77×10 8 /Kg, CD4:1,16×10 8 /Kg, CD8: 1,06×10 8 /Kg. Antithymocyte globulin (ATG) was administered to 15 and steroids to 54 pts. Thirty pts developed acute and 71 chronic graft versus host disease (cGVHD). Forty-six donors were non-immunized, 19 vaccinated and 13 naturally immunized. Data on Immunity origin were missing for 4 donors. HbsAb disappearance was observed in 39/82 pts, 24(6–60) months post transplant with a probability of loss 90% at 5 years. Multivariate analysis revealed as significant risk factors for HbsAb loss the BM graft, ATG administration, age ( p :0,06). Among the 39 pts who lost Immunity, 6 developed hepatitisB. All had a previous natural Immunity. Four had been transplanted from non-immunized and 2 from naturally immunized donors and all had been treated or were on intensive therapy for refractory cGvHD. The probability for HBV infection for pts who lost the HbsAb, regardless of Immunity origin, was 18% at 12 years. Six of 28 naturally immunized pts who lost the HbsAb developed hepatitis. In this cohort of pts the probability of HBV reactivation was estimated to be 26% at 12 years. In our study, the majority of pts lost their pre-transplant protection against HBV while the Adoptive transfer of Immunity, although established, didn’t offer long-lasting protection. As the possibility of hepatitisB is not negligible, serial serological monitoring and timely vaccination schedule for re-immunization in the early but also in the late post transplant period, might be necessary for patients with low or decreasing HbsAb titers.

Ioanna Sakellari – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • allografted recipients immunized against hepatitis b virus are at high risk of gradual surface antibody hbsab disappearance post transplant regardless of Adoptive Immunity transfer
    Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, 2007
    Co-Authors: Panayotis Kaloyannidis, Evangelia Yannaki, Ioannis Batsis, Despoina Adamidou, Demetrios Bartzoudis, Maria Papathanasiou, Despoina Mallouri, Ioanna Sakellari, Athanasios Fassas, Achilles Anagnostopoulos
    Abstract:

    Abstract Immunized against hepatitis B virus (HBV) recipients are at risk of developing HBV postallogeneic stem cell transplantation because of the potential loss of their HBV Immunity. The aim of the study was to evaluate: (1) the HbsAb eradication incidence posttransplant and potential risk factors, (2) the impact of donor’s Immunity on HbsAb loss, (3) the incidence of hepatitis B in patients with HbsAb disappearance. We studied, retrospectively, in 26 vaccinated and 56 naturally immunized recipients, the posttransplant HbsAb titers for a median period of 36 (6-132) months. The probability of HbsAb loss and HBV-related hepatitis was determined in all recipients. The impact of donor’s Immunity origin in the HBsAb disappearance was evaluated in the subgroup of, actively or naturally, immunized recipients/donors pairs. The 5-year probability of HbsAb disappearance was 90% for all patients with 18% probability of developing hepatitis at 12 years, for those who lost HbsAb. Marrow graft, antithymocyte globulin administration, age

  • Immunized Against Hepatitis B Virus Allografted Recipients Are at High Risk for Gradual Surface Antibody (HbsAb) Disappearance Post Transplant, Regardless of Adoptive Immunity Transfer: A Study of 82 Allografted Long Term Survivors.
    Blood, 2006
    Co-Authors: Panayotis Kaloyannidis, Evangelia Yannaki, Ioannis Batsis, Despoina Adamidou, Demetrios Bartzoudis, Maria Papathanasiou, Despoina Mallouri, Ioanna Sakellari, Athanasios Fassas, Achilles Anagnostopoulos
    Abstract:

    The presence of Hepatitis-B virus(HBV) surface antibody(HbsAb) is a strong indicator for the existence of HBV-Immunity. Immunosuppressed allografted recipients are at risk of developing HBV hepatitis due to the potential loss of their Immunity against HBV. The primary aim of the present study was to evaluate the incidence of HbsAb eradication post allo-transplantation, the potential risk factors and the impact of Adoptive Immunity transfer in the HbsAb loss. Additionally, to estimate the cumulative incidence of HBV infection in patients (pts) with HbsAb disappearance. Eighty-two immunized recipients aged 27(14–54) years and their donors were retrospectively studied. Fifty-six pts were naturally immunized while 26 were vaccinated. The median follow-up period was 36(6–132) months. Seventy-two were transplanted from siblings (4 with 1 Ag mismatch). Seven donors were matched unrelated volunteers, 2 were twins and 1 was haploidentical. Eighty-one pts received myeloablative conditioning. Marrow (BM) was infused in 23 pts, peripheral stem cells (PBSC) in 58 and BM plus PBSC in 1, with a median number of CD34:4,45×10 6 /Kg, CD3:2,77×10 8 /Kg, CD4:1,16×10 8 /Kg, CD8: 1,06×10 8 /Kg. Antithymocyte globulin (ATG) was administered to 15 and steroids to 54 pts. Thirty pts developed acute and 71 chronic graft versus host disease (cGVHD). Forty-six donors were non-immunized, 19 vaccinated and 13 naturally immunized. Data on Immunity origin were missing for 4 donors. HbsAb disappearance was observed in 39/82 pts, 24(6–60) months post transplant with a probability of loss 90% at 5 years. Multivariate analysis revealed as significant risk factors for HbsAb loss the BM graft, ATG administration, age ( p :0,06). Among the 39 pts who lost Immunity, 6 developed hepatitisB. All had a previous natural Immunity. Four had been transplanted from non-immunized and 2 from naturally immunized donors and all had been treated or were on intensive therapy for refractory cGvHD. The probability for HBV infection for pts who lost the HbsAb, regardless of Immunity origin, was 18% at 12 years. Six of 28 naturally immunized pts who lost the HbsAb developed hepatitis. In this cohort of pts the probability of HBV reactivation was estimated to be 26% at 12 years. In our study, the majority of pts lost their pre-transplant protection against HBV while the Adoptive transfer of Immunity, although established, didn’t offer long-lasting protection. As the possibility of hepatitisB is not negligible, serial serological monitoring and timely vaccination schedule for re-immunization in the early but also in the late post transplant period, might be necessary for patients with low or decreasing HbsAb titers.