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Adrenal Cortex Function

The Experts below are selected from a list of 168 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Jaakko Mononen – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • sand floor for farmed blue foxes effects on claws Adrenal Cortex Function growth and fur properties
    International Journal of Zoology, 2009
    Co-Authors: Leena Ahola, Tarja Koistinen, Jaakko Mononen

    Abstract:

    Farmed blue foxes (Vulpes lagopus) are traditionally housed on mesh floors where they are unable to perform certain species-specific behaviours, such as digging, which may compromise the animals’ welfare. This study describes how a possibility to use in-cage sand floor affects welfare-related variables like growth of the claws, Adrenal Cortex Function, and fur properties in juvenile blue foxes. The foxes (

  • effects of group housing in an enlarged cage system on growth bite wounds and Adrenal Cortex Function in farmed blue foxes alopex lagopus
    Animal Welfare, 2000
    Co-Authors: Leena Ahola, Jaakko Mononen, Mikko Harri, Sari Kasanen, Teija Pyykonen

    Abstract:

    In this study we measured the welfare of farmed blue foxes housed in two different social and spatial conditions: (i) traditional housing (group T) where a male and a female cub were housed together and their vixen alone in standard (1.2 m2) fox cages; and (ii) family housing (group F) where a vixen and her 5 cubs were housed together in a connected 6-cage system (7.2 m2). Production-related welfare parameters (weight gain and the incidence of bite wounds on fur) as well as physiological ones (Adrenal mass and serum cortisol response to ACTH administration) were measured in these two groups. No differences were found in any of the measured parameters between the vixens housed in traditional and family units. In cubs, there was less difference between the sexes in weight gain in group F than in group T, and a significantly lower weight gain was evident only in group T female cubs. The serum cortisol level in response to an ACTH challenge was higher in group T cubs and independent of the sex of the animal, while heavier Adrenals were observed in group T male cubs only. It is concluded that the enlarged cage system combined with group housing had some beneficial effects on the measured performance- and welfare-related indicators in blue fox cubs.

  • Relationship between hyponeophagia and Adrenal Cortex Function in farmed foxes.
    Physiology & behavior, 1999
    Co-Authors: Teppo Rekila, Mikko Harri, Liisa Jalkanen, Jaakko Mononen

    Abstract:

    The Adrenal Cortex Function of farmed blue (Alopex lagopus) and silver foxes (Vulpes vulpes) differing in their reaction in the feeding test were assessed. The urine cortisol:creatinine ratio was lower for those animals eating in the feeding test in comparison to those not eating in both species. In addition, eater silver foxes had lower baseline serum cortisol concentration and also lower serum cortisol concentration 2 h after ACTH administration than noneaters. There were no differences in any serum cortisol levels between the eater and noneater blue foxes. The weights of body and Adrenals did not differ between confident and fearful animals in either species. The present study demonstrates that animals not eating in the feeding test may have higher fearfulness and be more stressed than animals eating.

Li Liangcheng – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • the effect of the simulated altitude hypoxia on the development of Adrenal Cortex Function of neonatal rats
    Chinese journal of applied physiology, 1997
    Co-Authors: Du Jizeng, Yang Shengmei, Li Liangcheng

    Abstract:

    The response of the corticosterone in neonatal rats to simulated altitude hypoxia and the development of their Adrenal Cortex Function at 5 km altitude was investgated. When exposed to 5 km and 7 km altitude for 24h, the content of Adrenal Cortex and plasmic corticosterone of 7d (7 days old) rats did not change. But the plasmic corticosterone decreased in 14d rats at 7 km altitude (20.33% of control). The plasmic corticosterone of 21d rats also reduced at 7 km (5% of control), and their Adrenal gland corticosterone increased significantly at 5 km and 7 km (144% and 167% of control, respectively). For 28d rats, their plasmic corticosterone stopped to decrease under hypoxia, and the content of Adrenal gland corticosterone increased at 7 km (164% of control), suggesting that in the neonatal rat before 28d old the response of the biosyntheses of Adrenal corticosterone to hypoxia was much sensitive than the release of corticosterone. When 1 day old neonatal rats developed at 5 km altitude for 3 and 7d, the development of the Function of their Adrenal corticosterone was not influenced. But when developed for 14, 21 and 28d, the content of plasmic and Adrenal gland corticosterone decreased significantly, and the development of the Function of Adrenal gland was inhibited severely.

Mikko Harri – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • effects of group housing in an enlarged cage system on growth bite wounds and Adrenal Cortex Function in farmed blue foxes alopex lagopus
    Animal Welfare, 2000
    Co-Authors: Leena Ahola, Jaakko Mononen, Mikko Harri, Sari Kasanen, Teija Pyykonen

    Abstract:

    In this study we measured the welfare of farmed blue foxes housed in two different social and spatial conditions: (i) traditional housing (group T) where a male and a female cub were housed together and their vixen alone in standard (1.2 m2) fox cages; and (ii) family housing (group F) where a vixen and her 5 cubs were housed together in a connected 6-cage system (7.2 m2). Production-related welfare parameters (weight gain and the incidence of bite wounds on fur) as well as physiological ones (Adrenal mass and serum cortisol response to ACTH administration) were measured in these two groups. No differences were found in any of the measured parameters between the vixens housed in traditional and family units. In cubs, there was less difference between the sexes in weight gain in group F than in group T, and a significantly lower weight gain was evident only in group T female cubs. The serum cortisol level in response to an ACTH challenge was higher in group T cubs and independent of the sex of the animal, while heavier Adrenals were observed in group T male cubs only. It is concluded that the enlarged cage system combined with group housing had some beneficial effects on the measured performance- and welfare-related indicators in blue fox cubs.

  • Relationship between hyponeophagia and Adrenal Cortex Function in farmed foxes.
    Physiology & behavior, 1999
    Co-Authors: Teppo Rekila, Mikko Harri, Liisa Jalkanen, Jaakko Mononen

    Abstract:

    The Adrenal Cortex Function of farmed blue (Alopex lagopus) and silver foxes (Vulpes vulpes) differing in their reaction in the feeding test were assessed. The urine cortisol:creatinine ratio was lower for those animals eating in the feeding test in comparison to those not eating in both species. In addition, eater silver foxes had lower baseline serum cortisol concentration and also lower serum cortisol concentration 2 h after ACTH administration than noneaters. There were no differences in any serum cortisol levels between the eater and noneater blue foxes. The weights of body and Adrenals did not differ between confident and fearful animals in either species. The present study demonstrates that animals not eating in the feeding test may have higher fearfulness and be more stressed than animals eating.

  • relationship between hyponeophagia and Adrenal Cortex Function in farmed foxes
    Physiology & Behavior, 1998
    Co-Authors: Teppo Rekila, Mikko Harri, Liisa Jalkanen, Jaakko Mononen

    Abstract:

    Abstract REKILA, T., M. HARRI, L. JALKANEN AND J. MONONEN. Relationship between hyponeophagia and Adrenal Cortex Function in farmed foxes. PHYSIOL BEHAV 65 (4/5) 779–783, 1999.—The Adrenal Cortex Function of farmed blue ( Alopex lagopus ) and silver foxes ( Vulpes vulpes ) differing in their reaction in the feeding test were assessed. The urine cortisol:creatinine ratio was lower for those animals eating in the feeding test in comparison to those not eating in both species. In addition, eater silver foxes had lower baseline serum cortisol concentration and also lower serum cortisol concentration 2 h after ACTH administration than noneaters. There were no differences in any serum cortisol levels between the eater and noneater blue foxes. The weights of body and Adrenals did not differ between confident and fearful animals in either species. The present study demonstrates that animals not eating in the feeding test may have higher fearfulness and be more stressed than animals eating.