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Adrenocortical Hormone

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Jordan Dimitrakov – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Adrenocortical Hormone Abnormalities in Men with Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome
    Urology, 2008
    Co-Authors: Jordan Dimitrakov, Hylton V. Joffe, Steven J. Soldin, Roger Bolus, C.a. Tony Buffington, J. Curtis Nickel

    Abstract:

    OBJECTIVES To identify Adrenocortical Hormone abnormalities as indicators of endocrine dysfunction in chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS). METHODS We simultaneously measured the serum concentrations of 12 steroids in patients with CP/CPPS and controls, using isotope dilution liquid chromatography, followed by atmospheric pressure photospray ionization and tandem mass spectrometry. RESULTS We evaluated 27 patients with CP/CPPS and 29 age-matched asymptomatic healthy controls. In the mineralocorticoid pathway, progesterone was significantly greater, and the corticosterone and aldosterone concentrations were significantly lower, in the patients with CP/CPPS than in the controls. In the glucocorticoid pathway, 11-deoxycortisol was significantly lower and the cortisol concentrations were not different between the patients and controls. In the sex steroid pathway, the androstenedione and testosterone concentrations were significantly greater in those with CP/CPPS than in the controls. The estradiol, dehydroepiandrosterone, and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate concentrations were not different between the patients and controls. The National Institutes of Health-Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index total and pain domain scores correlated positively with the 17-hydroxyprogesterone and aldosterone (P

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  • Adrenocortical Hormone abnormalities in men with chronic prostatitis chronic pelvic pain syndrome
    Urology, 2008
    Co-Authors: Jordan Dimitrakov, Hylton V. Joffe, Steven J. Soldin, Roger Bolus, C.a. Tony Buffington, Curtis J Nickel

    Abstract:

    OBJECTIVES To identify Adrenocortical Hormone abnormalities as indicators of endocrine dysfunction in chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS). METHODS We simultaneously measured the serum concentrations of 12 steroids in patients with CP/CPPS and controls, using isotope dilution liquid chromatography, followed by atmospheric pressure photospray ionization and tandem mass spectrometry. RESULTS We evaluated 27 patients with CP/CPPS and 29 age-matched asymptomatic healthy controls. In the mineralocorticoid pathway, progesterone was significantly greater, and the corticosterone and aldosterone concentrations were significantly lower, in the patients with CP/CPPS than in the controls. In the glucocorticoid pathway, 11-deoxycortisol was significantly lower and the cortisol concentrations were not different between the patients and controls. In the sex steroid pathway, the androstenedione and testosterone concentrations were significantly greater in those with CP/CPPS than in the controls. The estradiol, dehydroepiandrosterone, and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate concentrations were not different between the patients and controls. The National Institutes of Health-Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index total and pain domain scores correlated positively with the 17-hydroxyprogesterone and aldosterone (P <0.001) and negatively with the cortisol (P <0.001) concentrations. CONCLUSIONS Our results suggest reduced activity of CYP21A2 (P450c21), the enzyme that converts progesterone to corticosterone and 17-hydroxyprogesterone to 11-deoxycortisol. Furthermore, these results provide insights into the biologic basis of CP/CPPS. Follow-up studies should explore the possibility that patients with CP/CPPS meet the diagnostic criteria for nonclassic congenital adrenal hyperplasia and whether the hormonal findings improve or worsen in parallel with symptom severity.

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Steven J. Soldin – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • hormonal circadian rhythms in patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia identifying optimal monitoring times and novel disease biomarkers
    European Journal of Endocrinology, 2015
    Co-Authors: Miguel Debono, Steven J. Soldin, Ashwini Mallappa, Verena Gounden, Aikaterini A Nella, Robert F Harrison, Christopher A Crutchfield, Peter S Backlund, R J M Ross, Deborah P Merke

    Abstract:

    OBJECTIVES: The treatment goal in congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is to replace glucocorticoids while avoiding androgen excess and iatrogenic Cushing’s syndrome. However, there is no consensus on how to monitor disease control. Our main objectives were to evaluate hormonal circadian rhythms and use these profiles to identify optimal monitoring times and novel disease biomarkers in CAH adults on intermediate- and long-acting glucocorticoids. DESIGN: This was an observational, cross-sectional study at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center in 16 patients with classic CAH. METHODS: Twenty-four-hour serum sampling for ACTH, 17-hydroxyprogesterone (17OHP), androstenedione (A4), androsterone, DHEA, testosterone, progesterone and 24-h urinary pdiol and 5β-pdiol was carried out. Bayesian spectral analysis and cosinor analysis were performed to detect circadian rhythmicity. The number of hours to minimal (TminAC) and maximal (TmaxAC) Adrenocortical Hormone levels after dose administration was calculated. RESULTS: A significant rhythm was confirmed for ACTH (r(2), 0.95; P<0.001), 17OHP (r(2), 0.70; P=0.003), androstenedione (r(2), 0.47; P=0.043), androsterone (r(2), 0.80; P<0.001), testosterone (r(2), 0.47; P=0.042) and progesterone (r(2), 0.64; P=0.006). The mean (s.d.) TminAC and TmaxAC for 17OHP and A4 were: morning prednisone (4.3 (2.3) and 9.7 (3.5) h), evening prednisone (4.5 (2.0) and 10.3 (2.4) h), and daily dexamethasone (9.2 (3.5) and 16.4 (7.2) h). AUC0-24 h progesterone, androsterone and 24-h urine pdiol were significantly related to 17OHP. CONCLUSION: In CAH patients, adrenal androgens exhibit circadian rhythms influenced by glucocorticoid replacement. Measurement of Adrenocortical Hormones and interpretation of results should take into account the type of glucocorticoid and time of dose administration. Progesterone and backdoor metabolites may provide alternative disease biomarkers.

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  • Adrenocortical Hormone Abnormalities in Men with Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome
    Urology, 2008
    Co-Authors: Jordan Dimitrakov, Hylton V. Joffe, Steven J. Soldin, Roger Bolus, C.a. Tony Buffington, J. Curtis Nickel

    Abstract:

    OBJECTIVES To identify Adrenocortical Hormone abnormalities as indicators of endocrine dysfunction in chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS). METHODS We simultaneously measured the serum concentrations of 12 steroids in patients with CP/CPPS and controls, using isotope dilution liquid chromatography, followed by atmospheric pressure photospray ionization and tandem mass spectrometry. RESULTS We evaluated 27 patients with CP/CPPS and 29 age-matched asymptomatic healthy controls. In the mineralocorticoid pathway, progesterone was significantly greater, and the corticosterone and aldosterone concentrations were significantly lower, in the patients with CP/CPPS than in the controls. In the glucocorticoid pathway, 11-deoxycortisol was significantly lower and the cortisol concentrations were not different between the patients and controls. In the sex steroid pathway, the androstenedione and testosterone concentrations were significantly greater in those with CP/CPPS than in the controls. The estradiol, dehydroepiandrosterone, and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate concentrations were not different between the patients and controls. The National Institutes of Health-Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index total and pain domain scores correlated positively with the 17-hydroxyprogesterone and aldosterone (P

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  • Adrenocortical Hormone abnormalities in men with chronic prostatitis chronic pelvic pain syndrome
    Urology, 2008
    Co-Authors: Jordan Dimitrakov, Hylton V. Joffe, Steven J. Soldin, Roger Bolus, C.a. Tony Buffington, Curtis J Nickel

    Abstract:

    OBJECTIVES To identify Adrenocortical Hormone abnormalities as indicators of endocrine dysfunction in chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS). METHODS We simultaneously measured the serum concentrations of 12 steroids in patients with CP/CPPS and controls, using isotope dilution liquid chromatography, followed by atmospheric pressure photospray ionization and tandem mass spectrometry. RESULTS We evaluated 27 patients with CP/CPPS and 29 age-matched asymptomatic healthy controls. In the mineralocorticoid pathway, progesterone was significantly greater, and the corticosterone and aldosterone concentrations were significantly lower, in the patients with CP/CPPS than in the controls. In the glucocorticoid pathway, 11-deoxycortisol was significantly lower and the cortisol concentrations were not different between the patients and controls. In the sex steroid pathway, the androstenedione and testosterone concentrations were significantly greater in those with CP/CPPS than in the controls. The estradiol, dehydroepiandrosterone, and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate concentrations were not different between the patients and controls. The National Institutes of Health-Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index total and pain domain scores correlated positively with the 17-hydroxyprogesterone and aldosterone (P <0.001) and negatively with the cortisol (P <0.001) concentrations. CONCLUSIONS Our results suggest reduced activity of CYP21A2 (P450c21), the enzyme that converts progesterone to corticosterone and 17-hydroxyprogesterone to 11-deoxycortisol. Furthermore, these results provide insights into the biologic basis of CP/CPPS. Follow-up studies should explore the possibility that patients with CP/CPPS meet the diagnostic criteria for nonclassic congenital adrenal hyperplasia and whether the hormonal findings improve or worsen in parallel with symptom severity.

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C.a. Tony Buffington – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Adrenocortical Hormone Abnormalities in Men with Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome
    Urology, 2008
    Co-Authors: Jordan Dimitrakov, Hylton V. Joffe, Steven J. Soldin, Roger Bolus, C.a. Tony Buffington, J. Curtis Nickel

    Abstract:

    OBJECTIVES To identify Adrenocortical Hormone abnormalities as indicators of endocrine dysfunction in chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS). METHODS We simultaneously measured the serum concentrations of 12 steroids in patients with CP/CPPS and controls, using isotope dilution liquid chromatography, followed by atmospheric pressure photospray ionization and tandem mass spectrometry. RESULTS We evaluated 27 patients with CP/CPPS and 29 age-matched asymptomatic healthy controls. In the mineralocorticoid pathway, progesterone was significantly greater, and the corticosterone and aldosterone concentrations were significantly lower, in the patients with CP/CPPS than in the controls. In the glucocorticoid pathway, 11-deoxycortisol was significantly lower and the cortisol concentrations were not different between the patients and controls. In the sex steroid pathway, the androstenedione and testosterone concentrations were significantly greater in those with CP/CPPS than in the controls. The estradiol, dehydroepiandrosterone, and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate concentrations were not different between the patients and controls. The National Institutes of Health-Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index total and pain domain scores correlated positively with the 17-hydroxyprogesterone and aldosterone (P

    Free Register to Access Article

  • Adrenocortical Hormone abnormalities in men with chronic prostatitis chronic pelvic pain syndrome
    Urology, 2008
    Co-Authors: Jordan Dimitrakov, Hylton V. Joffe, Steven J. Soldin, Roger Bolus, C.a. Tony Buffington, Curtis J Nickel

    Abstract:

    OBJECTIVES To identify Adrenocortical Hormone abnormalities as indicators of endocrine dysfunction in chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS). METHODS We simultaneously measured the serum concentrations of 12 steroids in patients with CP/CPPS and controls, using isotope dilution liquid chromatography, followed by atmospheric pressure photospray ionization and tandem mass spectrometry. RESULTS We evaluated 27 patients with CP/CPPS and 29 age-matched asymptomatic healthy controls. In the mineralocorticoid pathway, progesterone was significantly greater, and the corticosterone and aldosterone concentrations were significantly lower, in the patients with CP/CPPS than in the controls. In the glucocorticoid pathway, 11-deoxycortisol was significantly lower and the cortisol concentrations were not different between the patients and controls. In the sex steroid pathway, the androstenedione and testosterone concentrations were significantly greater in those with CP/CPPS than in the controls. The estradiol, dehydroepiandrosterone, and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate concentrations were not different between the patients and controls. The National Institutes of Health-Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index total and pain domain scores correlated positively with the 17-hydroxyprogesterone and aldosterone (P <0.001) and negatively with the cortisol (P <0.001) concentrations. CONCLUSIONS Our results suggest reduced activity of CYP21A2 (P450c21), the enzyme that converts progesterone to corticosterone and 17-hydroxyprogesterone to 11-deoxycortisol. Furthermore, these results provide insights into the biologic basis of CP/CPPS. Follow-up studies should explore the possibility that patients with CP/CPPS meet the diagnostic criteria for nonclassic congenital adrenal hyperplasia and whether the hormonal findings improve or worsen in parallel with symptom severity.

    Free Register to Access Article