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Colleen M. Ryan – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Sexual activity and romantic relationships after Burn injury: A Life Impact Burn Recovery Evaluation (LIBRE) study
    Burns : journal of the International Society for Burn Injuries, 2020
    Co-Authors: Emily A. Ohrtman, Lewis E Kazis, Colleen M. Ryan, Gabriel D. Shapiro, Audrey E Wolfe, Nhi-ha Trinh, Amy Acton, Mary D. Slavin, Jeffrey C. Schneider

    Abstract:

    BACKGROUND Engaging in healthy sexual activity and romantic relationships are important but often neglected areas of post-Burn rehabilitation. The degree to which persons with Burn injuries engage in sexual activity and romantic relationships is not well understood. This study examined demographic and clinical characteristics predicting engagement in sexual activity and romantic relationships in a sample of Adult Burn survivors compared to a general United States sample. METHODS Data for the Adult Burn survivor sample were from 601 Adult Burn survivors who participated in field-testing for the calibration of the Life Impact Burn Recovery Evaluation (LIBRE) Profile, a Burn-specific instrument assessing social participation on six scales including sexual activity and romantic relationships. Comparison data were obtained from a general population sample of 2000 Adults through sample matching. Demographic predictors of sexual activity and romantic relationship status were examined in each sample using modified Poisson regression analyses. Clinical predictors of engaging in sexual activity and romantic relationships were also examined in the LIBRE sample. RESULTS Participants were slightly more likely to report being sexually active in the Adult Burn survivor sample than in the general sample (65% vs. 57%, p 

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  • The Impact of Adverse Childhood Experiences on Burn Outcomes in Adult Burn Patients.
    Journal of burn care & research : official publication of the American Burn Association, 2019
    Co-Authors: Mikenzy Fassel, Lewis E Kazis, Colleen M. Ryan, Brian Grieve, Sameen Hosseini, Resmiye Oral, Colette Galet, Ni Pengsheng, Lucy Wibbenmeyer

    Abstract:

    Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs), including child maltreatment and household dysfunction, define adverse events that occur before 18 years of age. National and state data show that between 12.5 and 14.5% of the Adult population report ≥4 ACEs (HIGH-ACE), respectively. HIGH-ACEs are associated with more chronic health problems. To date, the interaction between ACEs and Burn injuries has not been studied. Herein, we sought to define the ACE exposure in our Burn patients and its impact on early outcomes. Inpatient and outpatient Adult Burn survivors (≥18 years of age) were enrolled. Subjects completed surveys assessing adverse experiences (ACEs-18), needs, strengths, and resiliency at consent, and pain, depression, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and social participation surveys at 2 weeks to 3 months postinjury. Demographics, Burn, and hospital course data were also collected. Chi-square and student’s t-tests were used for descriptive analysis and to compare the groups (HIGH-ACE vs LOW-ACE). The HIGH-ACE group (n = 24; 45.3%) reported more depressive symptoms (P < .04) than the LOW-ACE group (n = 29, 54.7%). HIGH-ACE patients were less resilient when facing stressful events (P ≤ .02) and more likely to screen positive for probable PTSD (P = .01) and to score lower on the Life Impact Burn Recovery Evaluation Profile (LIBRE Profile), which assesses for social participation, in the domain of Family and Friends (P = .015). Our exploratory study suggests that ACE screening may help detect Burn patients at risk for a more complicated recovery, thereby promoting personalized assistance in recovery.

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  • The Development and Validity of the Adult Burn Outcome Questionnaire Short Form
    Journal of burn care & research : official publication of the American Burn Association, 2017
    Co-Authors: Liang Chen, Lewis E Kazis, Austin Lee, Gabriel D. Shapiro, Jeremy Goverman, Nicholas Faoro, Jeffrey C. Schneider, Colleen M. Ryan

    Abstract:

    Patient Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) are useful for understanding the health needs and outcomes of the general public. We aim to develop a Burn-specific metric-Adult Burn Outcome Questionnaire (ABOQ)-that is brief and can be administered electronically to all Burn survivors over the age of 18. The 14-item ABOQ was developed from the already validated Young Adult Burn Outcome Questionnaire (YABOQ) long form. The ABOQ questionnaire, along with Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement System-10 (PROMIS-10), was administered to 120 outpatient Burn survivors at three hospitals. Clinical validity of the ABOQ was measured by testing associations between ABOQ items and Burn size, the PROMIS-10 generic items and composite scales using correlational analysis including multivariate canonical analysis. Nine out of 14 ABOQ items were significantly correlated with Burn size (correlations ranging from -0.25 to -0.46, P < .01). The canonical correlation between ABOQ and Burn size was 0.68 (P = .0002). The overall canonical correlation between two instruments was also significant (P < .0001). At the item level, at least 25% of the variation in each of the five ABOQ items could be explained by PROMIS-10 items and composite scores, while six other items could only be accounted for by less than 15% of the variation. ABOQ short form assessment can be used to efficiently measure Burn outcomes across a range of relevant clinical domains with credible validity. A large proportion of the variation in ABOQ scores was not accounted for by PROMIS-10, suggesting that ABOQ provided additional health-related information specifically for the Burn population beyond the generic instrument.

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Martina De Zwaan – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • validation of the german version of the perceived stigmatization questionnaire social comfort questionnaire in Adult Burn survivors
    Burns, 2016
    Co-Authors: Astrid Müller, Dirk Smits, Laurence Claes, Stefanie Jasper, Lea Berg, Ramin Ipaktchi, Peter M. Vogt, Martina De Zwaan

    Abstract:

    Abstract Objective To investigate the factor structure, reliability, and validity of the German version of the Perceived Stigmatization Questionnaire/Social Comfort Questionnaire (PSQ/SCQ) in Burn victims. Methods The PSQ/SCQ was answered by 139 Adult Burn survivors (age M = 49.69, SD = 15.16 years). Factor structure was examined using a confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). Validity was investigated through correlations between the PSQ/SCQ scales and questionnaires assessing perceived social support, Burn-specific health-related quality of life, symptoms of anxiety/depression, and percent of total body surface area (TBSA) Burned. Additionally, the link between perceived stigmatization/social comfort and current partnership status was investigated. Results The four-factor model showed the best fit to the data with three PSQ factors (Absence of Friendly Behavior, Confused/Staring Behavior, and Hostile Behavior) and one single SCQ factor. All PSQ/SCQ scales showed good internal consistency. Higher PSQ/lower SCQ means were related to less perceived social support, less Burn-specific quality of life, and more symptoms of anxiety/depression. With the exception of a positive correlation with the PSQ subscale Confused Behavior and Staring, no other significant correlations were found between the PSQ/SCQ subscales and TBSA Burned. While PSQ/SCQ scores were not linked to age or gender, less perceived social stigmatization/more social comfort was reported by participants who were currently living with a partner. Conclusions The results indicate a four-factor structure and a good validity of the PSQ/SCQ which is in line with prior research. Further studies should investigate the application of the PSQ/SCQ in individuals with appearance distinctions that are not related to Burns.

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  • Validation of the German version of the Perceived Stigmatization Questionnaire/Social Comfort Questionnaire in Adult Burn survivors
    Burns : journal of the International Society for Burn Injuries, 2016
    Co-Authors: Astrid Müller, Dirk Smits, Laurence Claes, Stefanie Jasper, Lea Berg, Ramin Ipaktchi, Peter M. Vogt, Martina De Zwaan

    Abstract:

    Abstract Objective To investigate the factor structure, reliability, and validity of the German version of the Perceived Stigmatization Questionnaire/Social Comfort Questionnaire (PSQ/SCQ) in Burn victims. Methods The PSQ/SCQ was answered by 139 Adult Burn survivors (age M = 49.69, SD = 15.16 years). Factor structure was examined using a confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). Validity was investigated through correlations between the PSQ/SCQ scales and questionnaires assessing perceived social support, Burn-specific health-related quality of life, symptoms of anxiety/depression, and percent of total body surface area (TBSA) Burned. Additionally, the link between perceived stigmatization/social comfort and current partnership status was investigated. Results The four-factor model showed the best fit to the data with three PSQ factors (Absence of Friendly Behavior, Confused/Staring Behavior, and Hostile Behavior) and one single SCQ factor. All PSQ/SCQ scales showed good internal consistency. Higher PSQ/lower SCQ means were related to less perceived social support, less Burn-specific quality of life, and more symptoms of anxiety/depression. With the exception of a positive correlation with the PSQ subscale Confused Behavior and Staring, no other significant correlations were found between the PSQ/SCQ subscales and TBSA Burned. While PSQ/SCQ scores were not linked to age or gender, less perceived social stigmatization/more social comfort was reported by participants who were currently living with a partner. Conclusions The results indicate a four-factor structure and a good validity of the PSQ/SCQ which is in line with prior research. Further studies should investigate the application of the PSQ/SCQ in individuals with appearance distinctions that are not related to Burns.

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Walter J. Meyer – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Impact of obesity on body image dissatisfaction and social integration difficulty in adolescent and young Adult Burn injury survivors
    Journal of burn care & research : official publication of the American Burn Association, 2013
    Co-Authors: Maria Chondronikola, David N Herndon, Labros S. Sidossis, Lisa M. Richardson, Jeffrey Temple, Patricia Van Den Berg, Walter J. Meyer

    Abstract:

    Burn injury deformities and obesity have been associated with social integration difficulty and body image dissatisfaction. However, the combined effects of obesity and Burn injury on social integration difficulty and body image dissatisfaction are unknown. Adolescent and young Adult Burn injury survivors were categorized as normal weight (n = 47) or overweight and obese (n = 21). Burn-related and anthropometric information were obtained from patients’ medical records, and validated questionnaires were used to assess the main outcomes and possible confounders. Analysis of covariance and multiple linear regressions were performed to evaluate the objectives of this study. Obese and overweight Burn injury survivors did not experience increased body image dissatisfaction (12 ± 4.3 vs 13.1 ± 4.4; P = .57) or social integration difficulty (17.5 ± 6.9 vs 15.5 ± 5.7; P = .16) compared with normal weight Burn injury survivors. Weight status was not a significant predictor of social integration difficulty or body image dissatisfaction (P = .19 and P = .24, respectively). However, mobility limitations predicted greater social integration difficulty (P = .005) and body image dissatisfaction (P < .001), whereas higher weight status at Burn was a borderline significant predictor of body image dissatisfaction (P = .05). Obese and overweight adolescents and young Adults, who sustained major Burn injury as children, do not experience greater social integration difficulty and body image dissatisfaction compared with normal weight Burn injury survivors. Mobility limitations and higher weight status at Burn are likely more important factors affecting the long-term social integration difficulty and body image dissatisfaction of these young people. (J Burn Care Res 2013;34:102–108)

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  • Benchmarks for multidimensional recovery after Burn injury in young Adults: the development, validation, and testing of the American Burn Association/Shriners Hospitals for Children young Adult Burn outcome questionnaire.
    Journal of burn care & research : official publication of the American Burn Association, 2013
    Co-Authors: Colleen M. Ryan, Lewis E Kazis, Jeffrey C. Schneider, Austin F. Lee, Michelle I. Hinson, Helena Bauk, Michael Peck, Walter J. Meyer, Tina L. Palmieri

    Abstract:

    Abstract Although data exist on Burn survival, there are little data on long-term Burn recovery. Patient-centered health outcomes are useful in monitoring and predicting recovery and evaluating treatments. An outcome questionnaire for young Adult Burn survivors was developed and tested. This 5-year (2003-2008) prospective, controlled, multicenter study included Burned and nonBurned Adults ages 19 to 30 years. The Young Adult Burn Outcome Questionnaires were completed at initial contact, 10 days, and 6 and 12 months. Factor analysis established construct validity. Reliability assessments used Cronbach α and test-retest. Recovery patterns were investigated using generalized linear models, with generalized estimating equations using mixed models and random effects. Burned (n = 153) and nonBurned subjects (n = 112) completed 620 questionnaires (47 items). Time from injury to first questionnaire administration was 157 ± 36 days (mean ± SEM). Factor analysis included 15 factors: Physical Function, Fine Motor Function, Pain, Itch, Social Function Limited by Physical Function, Perceived Appearance, Social Function Limited by Appearance, Sexual Function, Emotion, Family Function, Family Concern, Satisfaction With Symptom Relief, Satisfaction With Role, Work Reintegration, and Religion. Cronbach α ranged from 0.72 to 0.92, with 11 scales >0.8. Test-retest reliability ranged from 0.29 to 0.94, suggesting changes in underlying health status after Burns. Recovery curves in five domains, Itch, Perceived Appearance, Social Function Limited by Appearance, Family Concern, and Satisfaction with Symptom Relief, remained below the reference group at 24 months. The Young Adult Burn Outcome Questionnaire is a reliable and valid instrument for multidimensional functional outcomes assessment. Recovery in some domains was incomplete.

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  • Differences in behavioral perceptions between young Adult Burn survivors and cross-informants
    Journal of burn care & research : official publication of the American Burn Association, 2008
    Co-Authors: William Russell, Charles E. Holzer, Rhonda S. Robert, Christopher R. Thomas, Patricia Blakeney, Walter J. Meyer

    Abstract:

    The purpose of this study is to gain insight into the level of agreement, in terms of personal problems, between Burn survivors and an informant with whom they have a close personal relationship. Participants in the study were 72 young Adult Burn survivors between the ages of 18 and 28 with a mean age of 20.9 +/- 2.6 years. There were 37 males and 35 females in the group. The mean total Burn surface area was 55.34 +/- 19.9% with injuries occurring before the age of 18, a minimum of 2 years prior to the study with a mean of 14.3 +/- 4.9 years since Burned. To assess this issue the participants completed The Young Adult Self-Report (YASR), and the informants completed The Young Adult Behavior Checklist (YABCL). In relationship to Burn survivors, the informant group comprised 67% mothers, 3% fathers, and 30% domestic partners. Paired t-test and Pearson Correlations Coefficients were calculated to compare the differences and variance of the Total Problems Scale, Internalizing Scale and Externalizing Scale for the YABCL and YASR results. The family members of Burn survivors reported more problems for their young Adult relatives than did the informants of the reference population. In general, the YACBL scores were higher than and highly correlated to the YASR scores. Although there were not ethic differences in the YABCL and the YASR measures, the correlation between the YABCL and the YASR was excellent for Caucasian families but not good for Black and Hispanic families. This study supports concerns about the need for routine follow-up into Adulthood for those individuals who were Burned as children. This would seem to be especially critical for the female population.

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