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Shepherd Zeldin – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Pathways to Youth Empowerment and Community Connectedness: A Study of Youth-Adult Partnership in Malaysian After-School, Co-Curricular Programs
    Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 2016
    Co-Authors: Shepherd Zeldin, Steven Eric Krauss, Jessica Collura, Taehan Kim, Haslinda Abdullah
    Abstract:

    After-school programs are prevalent across the world, but there is a paucity of research that examines quality within the “black box” of programs at the point of service. Grounded in current theory, this research examined hypothesized pathways between the experience of youth-Adult partnership (youth voice in decision-making; supportive Adult Relationships), the mediators of program safety and engagement, and the developmental outcomes of youth empowerment (leadership competence, policy control) and community connectedness (community connections, school attachment). Surveys were administered to 207 ethnically diverse (47.3 % female; 63.3 % Malay) youth, age 15–16, attending after-school co-curricular programs in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Results showed that youth voice in program decision-making predicted both indicators of youth empowerment. Neither youth voice nor supportive Adult Relationships was directly associated with community connectedness, however. Program engagement mediated the associations between youth-Adult partnership and empowerment. In contrast, program safety mediated the associations between youth-Adult partnership and community connectedness. The findings indicate that the two core components of youth-Adult partnership—youth voice and supportive Adult Relationships—may operate through different, yet complementary, pathways of program quality to predict developmental outcomes. Implications for future research are highlighted. For reasons of youth development and youth rights, the immediate challenge is to create opportunities for youth to speak on issues of program concern and to elevate those Adults who are able and willing to help youth exercise their voice.

  • youth Adult partnership exploring contributions to empowerment agency and community connections in malaysian youth programs
    Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 2014
    Co-Authors: Steven Eric Krauss, Shepherd Zeldin, Jessica Collura, Adriana Ortega, Haslinda Abdullah, Abdul Hadi Sulaiman
    Abstract:

    Youth–Adult partnership (Y–AP) has emerged as a key practice for enacting two features of effective developmental settings: supportive Adult Relationships and support for efficacy and mattering. Previous studies have shown that when youth, supported by Adults, actively participate in organizational and community decision-making they are likely to show greater confidence and agency, empowerment and critical consciousness, and community connections. Most of the extant research on Y–AP is limited to qualitative studies and the identification of organizational best practices. Almost all research focuses on Western sociocultural settings. To address these gaps, 299 youth, age 15 to 24, were sampled from established afterschool and community programs in Malaysia to explore the contribution of Y–AP (operationalized as having two components: youth voice in decision-making and supportive Adult Relationships) to empowerment, agency and community connections. As hypothesized, hierarchical regressions indicated that program quality (Y–AP, safe environment and program engagement) contributed to agency, empowerment and community connections beyond the contribution of family, school and religion. Additionally, the Y–AP measures contributed substantially more variance than the other measures of program quality on each outcome. Interaction effects indicated differences by age for empowerment and agency but not for community connections. The primary findings in this inquiry replicate those found in previous interview and observational-oriented studies. The data suggests fertile ground for future research while demonstrating that Y–AP may be an effective practice for positive youth development outside of Western settings.

  • The Psychology and Practice of Youth-Adult Partnership: Bridging Generations for Youth Development and Community Change
    American Journal of Community Psychology, 2013
    Co-Authors: Shepherd Zeldin, Brian D. Christens, Jane L. Powers
    Abstract:

    Youth-Adult partnership (Y-AP) has become a phenomenon of interest to scholars and practitioners. Despite the potential of Y-AP to promote positive youth development, increase civic engagement, and support community change, the practice remains unfamiliar to many. Although research has increased over the past decade, the construct remains vague with an insufficient grounding in developmental theory and community practice. This article seeks to address these gaps by synthesizing data and insights from the historical foundations of Y-AP, community based research, and case study. We propose Y-AP as a unifying concept, distinct from other forms of youth-Adult Relationships, with four core elements: authentic decision making, natural mentors, reciprocity, and community connectedness. We conclude that Y-AP functions as an active ingredient and fundamental practice for positive youth development and civic engagement. Directions for future research are offered.

Haslinda Abdullah – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Pathways to Youth Empowerment and Community Connectedness: A Study of Youth-Adult Partnership in Malaysian After-School, Co-Curricular Programs
    Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 2016
    Co-Authors: Shepherd Zeldin, Steven Eric Krauss, Jessica Collura, Taehan Kim, Haslinda Abdullah
    Abstract:

    After-school programs are prevalent across the world, but there is a paucity of research that examines quality within the “black box” of programs at the point of service. Grounded in current theory, this research examined hypothesized pathways between the experience of youth-Adult partnership (youth voice in decision-making; supportive Adult Relationships), the mediators of program safety and engagement, and the developmental outcomes of youth empowerment (leadership competence, policy control) and community connectedness (community connections, school attachment). Surveys were administered to 207 ethnically diverse (47.3 % female; 63.3 % Malay) youth, age 15–16, attending after-school co-curricular programs in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Results showed that youth voice in program decision-making predicted both indicators of youth empowerment. Neither youth voice nor supportive Adult Relationships was directly associated with community connectedness, however. Program engagement mediated the associations between youth-Adult partnership and empowerment. In contrast, program safety mediated the associations between youth-Adult partnership and community connectedness. The findings indicate that the two core components of youth-Adult partnership—youth voice and supportive Adult Relationships—may operate through different, yet complementary, pathways of program quality to predict developmental outcomes. Implications for future research are highlighted. For reasons of youth development and youth rights, the immediate challenge is to create opportunities for youth to speak on issues of program concern and to elevate those Adults who are able and willing to help youth exercise their voice.

  • youth Adult partnership exploring contributions to empowerment agency and community connections in malaysian youth programs
    Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 2014
    Co-Authors: Steven Eric Krauss, Shepherd Zeldin, Jessica Collura, Adriana Ortega, Haslinda Abdullah, Abdul Hadi Sulaiman
    Abstract:

    Youth–Adult partnership (Y–AP) has emerged as a key practice for enacting two features of effective developmental settings: supportive Adult Relationships and support for efficacy and mattering. Previous studies have shown that when youth, supported by Adults, actively participate in organizational and community decision-making they are likely to show greater confidence and agency, empowerment and critical consciousness, and community connections. Most of the extant research on Y–AP is limited to qualitative studies and the identification of organizational best practices. Almost all research focuses on Western sociocultural settings. To address these gaps, 299 youth, age 15 to 24, were sampled from established afterschool and community programs in Malaysia to explore the contribution of Y–AP (operationalized as having two components: youth voice in decision-making and supportive Adult Relationships) to empowerment, agency and community connections. As hypothesized, hierarchical regressions indicated that program quality (Y–AP, safe environment and program engagement) contributed to agency, empowerment and community connections beyond the contribution of family, school and religion. Additionally, the Y–AP measures contributed substantially more variance than the other measures of program quality on each outcome. Interaction effects indicated differences by age for empowerment and agency but not for community connections. The primary findings in this inquiry replicate those found in previous interview and observational-oriented studies. The data suggests fertile ground for future research while demonstrating that Y–AP may be an effective practice for positive youth development outside of Western settings.

Nancy L. Deutsch – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Broadening the perspective on youth’s systems of support: An ecological examination of supportive peer and Adult Relationships during adolescence.
    Journal of community psychology, 2021
    Co-Authors: Theresa N. Melton, Margaret V. Brehm, Nancy L. Deutsch
    Abstract:

    This study applies the theory of positive youth development (Lerner et al., 2010) and the youth systems framework (Varga & Zaff, 2018) to the examination of supportive peer and Adult Relationships across multiple contexts in which youth develop. Results of egocentric social netwnetwork analysis indicated that high school-aged youth nominated significantly more Adults than middle school-aged youth. Peers and Adults both acted as important sources of support, although often the types of support they offer differ. Outdegree centrality of peers was a significant predictor of character. The size of a participant’s youth system, measured as the number of contexts accessed, along with average closeness in Adult Relationships, was a significant predictor of contribution. Thematic analysis of interview data identified four themes, aligned with the five actions of developmental Relationships, as contributing factors to youth-Adult closeness and youth perceptions of support (Pekel et al., 2018). Implications for youth-Adult Relationships are discussed.

  • Supporting Youth Purpose in Adolescence: Youth-Adult Relationships as Ecological Assets
    The Ecology of Purposeful Living Across the Lifespan, 2020
    Co-Authors: Nancy L. Deutsch
    Abstract:

    Having or developing a sense of purpose is an important component of positive adolescent development. However, there is limited empirical understanding of how youth purpose develops and what aspects of youth’s ecologies best support purpose development during adolescence. This chapter seeks to provide insight into how significant Adults, both parents and non-parental Adults, serve as ecological assets that may support purpose development for youth during adolescence. We begin by discussing how developmental and ecological theories can inform the broader literature on youth purpose. We then present findings from a study examining the development, characteristics, and influence of youth–Adult Relationships across multiple contexts and over key transition points across adolescence, focusing on the ways in which Relationships with parents and other significant Adults can play a key role in cultivating and nurturing purpose development during adolescence. We close by discussing implications for understanding effective ways of supporting purpose development during adolescence and the benefits of mixed methods research for those aims.

  • Aligning social support to youth’s developmental needs: The role of nonparental youth–Adult Relationships in early and late adolescence
    Applied Developmental Science, 2019
    Co-Authors: Nancy L. Deutsch
    Abstract:

    Through the provision of different types of social support, significant nonparental youth–Adult Relationships can facilitate youth’s positive development across adolescence. However, despite the po…

Steven Eric Krauss – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Pathways to Youth Empowerment and Community Connectedness: A Study of Youth-Adult Partnership in Malaysian After-School, Co-Curricular Programs
    Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 2016
    Co-Authors: Shepherd Zeldin, Steven Eric Krauss, Jessica Collura, Taehan Kim, Haslinda Abdullah
    Abstract:

    After-school programs are prevalent across the world, but there is a paucity of research that examines quality within the “black box” of programs at the point of service. Grounded in current theory, this research examined hypothesized pathways between the experience of youth-Adult partnership (youth voice in decision-making; supportive Adult Relationships), the mediators of program safety and engagement, and the developmental outcomes of youth empowerment (leadership competence, policy control) and community connectedness (community connections, school attachment). Surveys were administered to 207 ethnically diverse (47.3 % female; 63.3 % Malay) youth, age 15–16, attending after-school co-curricular programs in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Results showed that youth voice in program decision-making predicted both indicators of youth empowerment. Neither youth voice nor supportive Adult Relationships was directly associated with community connectedness, however. Program engagement mediated the associations between youth-Adult partnership and empowerment. In contrast, program safety mediated the associations between youth-Adult partnership and community connectedness. The findings indicate that the two core components of youth-Adult partnership—youth voice and supportive Adult Relationships—may operate through different, yet complementary, pathways of program quality to predict developmental outcomes. Implications for future research are highlighted. For reasons of youth development and youth rights, the immediate challenge is to create opportunities for youth to speak on issues of program concern and to elevate those Adults who are able and willing to help youth exercise their voice.

  • youth Adult partnership exploring contributions to empowerment agency and community connections in malaysian youth programs
    Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 2014
    Co-Authors: Steven Eric Krauss, Shepherd Zeldin, Jessica Collura, Adriana Ortega, Haslinda Abdullah, Abdul Hadi Sulaiman
    Abstract:

    Youth–Adult partnership (Y–AP) has emerged as a key practice for enacting two features of effective developmental settings: supportive Adult Relationships and support for efficacy and mattering. Previous studies have shown that when youth, supported by Adults, actively participate in organizational and community decision-making they are likely to show greater confidence and agency, empowerment and critical consciousness, and community connections. Most of the extant research on Y–AP is limited to qualitative studies and the identification of organizational best practices. Almost all research focuses on Western sociocultural settings. To address these gaps, 299 youth, age 15 to 24, were sampled from established afterschool and community programs in Malaysia to explore the contribution of Y–AP (operationalized as having two components: youth voice in decision-making and supportive Adult Relationships) to empowerment, agency and community connections. As hypothesized, hierarchical regressions indicated that program quality (Y–AP, safe environment and program engagement) contributed to agency, empowerment and community connections beyond the contribution of family, school and religion. Additionally, the Y–AP measures contributed substantially more variance than the other measures of program quality on each outcome. Interaction effects indicated differences by age for empowerment and agency but not for community connections. The primary findings in this inquiry replicate those found in previous interview and observational-oriented studies. The data suggests fertile ground for future research while demonstrating that Y–AP may be an effective practice for positive youth development outside of Western settings.

Theresa N. Melton – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Broadening the perspective on youth’s systems of support: An ecological examination of supportive peer and Adult Relationships during adolescence.
    Journal of community psychology, 2021
    Co-Authors: Theresa N. Melton, Margaret V. Brehm, Nancy L. Deutsch
    Abstract:

    This study applies the theory of positive youth development (Lerner et al., 2010) and the youth systems framework (Varga & Zaff, 2018) to the examination of supportive peer and Adult Relationships across multiple contexts in which youth develop. Results of egocentric social network analysis indicated that high school-aged youth nominated significantly more Adults than middle school-aged youth. Peers and Adults both acted as important sources of support, although often the types of support they offer differ. Outdegree centrality of peers was a significant predictor of character. The size of a participant’s youth system, measured as the number of contexts accessed, along with average closeness in Adult Relationships, was a significant predictor of contribution. Thematic analysis of interview data identified four themes, aligned with the five actions of developmental Relationships, as contributing factors to youth-Adult closeness and youth perceptions of support (Pekel et al., 2018). Implications for youth-Adult Relationships are discussed.

  • “It’s like all of his attention is on you”: A mixed methods examination of attachment, supportive nonparental youth-Adult Relationships, and self-esteem during adolescence
    Journal of community psychology, 2018
    Co-Authors: Nancy L. Deutsch, Valerie A. Futch Ehrlich, Miriam R. Arbeit, Haley E. Johnson, Theresa N. Melton
    Abstract:

    The purpose of this mixed methods study was to examine the relationship between attachment, supportive nonparental youth-Adult Relationships, and self-esteem during adolescence. First, in a quantitative path analysis, we found that perceived social support from nonparental Adults partially mediated the relationship between adolescent attachment and self-esteem. In our follow-up mixed methods analysis, we analyzed youth reflections of support experienced in Relationships with significant non-parental Adults (VIPs). As compared to youth with positive attachment models, youth with negative attachment models reported fewer instances of emotional support but more instances of validation support. The youth with negative attachment models described (1) the importance of trust and (2) receiving emotional support specific to their needs. In instances of validation support, these youth described how their VIPs (1) provided them with honest and realistic feedback, (2) challenged their negative thinking and (3) created opportunities for them to recognize and showcase their strengths. Our findings underscore the importance of considering youths’ individual attributes in the context of their ongoing Relationships in order to gain a more nuanced understanding of the role and dynamics of supportive nonparental youth-Adult Relationships in youths’ lives.