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P. Rufli – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Advanced Gas Turbine technology abb bcc historical firsts
    Journal of Engineering for Gas Turbines and Power-transactions of The Asme, 2002
    Co-Authors: D. Eckardt, P. Rufli

    Abstract:

    During more than 100 years engineers of the Swiss development center of A.-G. BBC Brown, Boveri & Cie., from 1988 onwards ABB Asea Brown Boveri Ltd., in 1999 ABB ALSTOM POWER Ltd., and now ALSTOM Power Ltd. in Baden, Switzerland, have significantly contributed to the achievement of today’s Advanced Gas Turbine concept. Numerous firsts are highlighted in this paper-ranging from the first realization of the industrial, heavy-duty Gas Turbine in the 1930s to today’s high-technology Gas Turbine (GT) products, combining excellent performance, extraordinary low environmental impact with commercial attractiveness for global power generation. Interesting connections could be unveiled for the early parallel development of industrial and areo Gas Turbines.

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  • Advanced Gas Turbine Technology: ABB/BCC Historical Firsts
    Journal of Engineering for Gas Turbines and Power, 2002
    Co-Authors: D. Eckardt, P. Rufli

    Abstract:

    During more than 100 years engineers of the Swiss development center of A.-G. BBC Brown, Boveri & Cie., from 1988 onwards ABB Asea Brown Boveri Ltd., in 1999 ABB ALSTOM POWER Ltd., and now ALSTOM Power Ltd. in Baden, Switzerland, have significantly contributed to the achievement of today’s Advanced Gas Turbine concept. Numerous firsts are highlighted in this paper-ranging from the first realization of the industrial, heavy-duty Gas Turbine in the 1930s to today’s high-technology Gas Turbine (GT) products, combining excellent performance, extraordinary low environmental impact with commercial attractiveness for global power generation. Interesting connections could be unveiled for the early parallel development of industrial and areo Gas Turbines.

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  • Advanced Gas Turbine Technology: ABB/BBC Historical Firsts
    Volume 3: Heat Transfer; Electric Power; Industrial and Cogeneration, 2001
    Co-Authors: D. Eckardt, P. Rufli

    Abstract:

    During more than 100 years engineers of the Swiss development center of A.-G. BBC Brown, Boveri & Cie., from 1988 onwards ABB Asea Brown Boveri Ltd, in 1999 ABB ALSTOM POWER Ltd and now ALSTOM Power Ltd in Baden, Switzerland have significantly contributed to the achievement of todays Advanced Gas Turbine concept. Numerous “Firsts” are highlighted in this paper — ranging from the first realization of the industrial, heavy-duty Gas Turbine in the 1930s to todays high-technology Gas Turbine (GT) products, combining excellent performance, extraordinary low environmental impact with commercial attractiveness for global power generation. Interesting connections could be unveiled for the early parallel development of industrial and areo Gas Turbines.Copyright © 2001 by ASME

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D. Eckardt – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Advanced Gas Turbine technology abb bcc historical firsts
    Journal of Engineering for Gas Turbines and Power-transactions of The Asme, 2002
    Co-Authors: D. Eckardt, P. Rufli

    Abstract:

    During more than 100 years engineers of the Swiss development center of A.-G. BBC Brown, Boveri & Cie., from 1988 onwards ABB Asea Brown Boveri Ltd., in 1999 ABB ALSTOM POWER Ltd., and now ALSTOM Power Ltd. in Baden, Switzerland, have significantly contributed to the achievement of today’s Advanced Gas Turbine concept. Numerous firsts are highlighted in this paper-ranging from the first realization of the industrial, heavy-duty Gas Turbine in the 1930s to today’s high-technology Gas Turbine (GT) products, combining excellent performance, extraordinary low environmental impact with commercial attractiveness for global power generation. Interesting connections could be unveiled for the early parallel development of industrial and areo Gas Turbines.

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  • Advanced Gas Turbine Technology: ABB/BCC Historical Firsts
    Journal of Engineering for Gas Turbines and Power, 2002
    Co-Authors: D. Eckardt, P. Rufli

    Abstract:

    During more than 100 years engineers of the Swiss development center of A.-G. BBC Brown, Boveri & Cie., from 1988 onwards ABB Asea Brown Boveri Ltd., in 1999 ABB ALSTOM POWER Ltd., and now ALSTOM Power Ltd. in Baden, Switzerland, have significantly contributed to the achievement of today’s Advanced Gas Turbine concept. Numerous firsts are highlighted in this paper-ranging from the first realization of the industrial, heavy-duty Gas Turbine in the 1930s to today’s high-technology Gas Turbine (GT) products, combining excellent performance, extraordinary low environmental impact with commercial attractiveness for global power generation. Interesting connections could be unveiled for the early parallel development of industrial and areo Gas Turbines.

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  • Advanced Gas Turbine Technology: ABB/BBC Historical Firsts
    Volume 3: Heat Transfer; Electric Power; Industrial and Cogeneration, 2001
    Co-Authors: D. Eckardt, P. Rufli

    Abstract:

    During more than 100 years engineers of the Swiss development center of A.-G. BBC Brown, Boveri & Cie., from 1988 onwards ABB Asea Brown Boveri Ltd, in 1999 ABB ALSTOM POWER Ltd and now ALSTOM Power Ltd in Baden, Switzerland have significantly contributed to the achievement of todays Advanced Gas Turbine concept. Numerous “Firsts” are highlighted in this paper — ranging from the first realization of the industrial, heavy-duty Gas Turbine in the 1930s to todays high-technology Gas Turbine (GT) products, combining excellent performance, extraordinary low environmental impact with commercial attractiveness for global power generation. Interesting connections could be unveiled for the early parallel development of industrial and areo Gas Turbines.Copyright © 2001 by ASME

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Robert A. Miller – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Thermal-Barrier Coatings for Advanced GasTurbine Engines
    MRS Bulletin, 2000
    Co-Authors: Dongming Zhu, Robert A. Miller

    Abstract:

    Ceramic thermal-barrier coatings (TBCs) have received increasing attention for GasTurbine engine applications. The advantages of using TBCs include increased fuel efficiency by allowing higher Gas temperatures and improved durability and reliability from lower component temperatures. As illustrated in Figure 1, TBCs can provide effective heat insulation to engine components, thus allowing higher operating temperatures and reduced cooling requirements. Atypical two-layer TBC system consists of a porous ZrO2-Y2O3 ceramic top coat and an oxidation-resistant metallic bond coat. These TBC systems can be applied to the metal substrate either by plasma spray or by electron-beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) techniques.

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  • Thermal Barrier Coatings for Advanced Gas Turbine and Diesel Engines
    , 1999
    Co-Authors: Dongming Zhu, Robert A. Miller

    Abstract:

    THERMAL BARRIER COATINGS FOR Advanced Gas Turbine AND DIESEL ENGINESDongming ZhuOhio Aerospace instituteCleveland, Ohio 44142Phone: (216) 433-5422E-mail: Dongming.Zhu @gre.nasa.govRobert A. MillerGlenn Research CenterCleveland, Ohio 44135ABSTRACTCeramic thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) have been developed for Advanced Gas Turbine and diesel engine applications toimprove engine reliability and fuel efficiency. However, durability issues of these thermal barrier coatings under high temperaturecyclic conditions are still of major concern. The coating failure depends not only on the coating, but also on the ceramicsinterinffcreep and bond coat oxidation under the operating conditions. Novel test approaches have been established to obtaincritical thermomechanical and thermophysical properties of the coating systems under near-realistic transient and steady statetemperature and stress gradients encountered in Advanced engine systems. This paper presents detailed experimental and modelingresults describing processes occurring in the ZrO2-Y203 thermal barrier coating systems, thus providing a framework fordeveloping strategies to manage ceramic coating architecture, microstructure and properties.INTRODUCTIONCeramic thermal barrier coatings ITBCs) have receivedincreasing attention lbr Advanced Gas Turbine and diesel engineapplications. The advantages of using ceramic thermal barriercoatings include increased engine power density, lhel efficiency,and improved engine reliability. As illustrated in Figure I,because of their low thermal conductivity, thermal barriercoatings can provide better heat insulation lbr the engine system,thus allowing higher operating temperatures and reducedcooling requirements for l’uture Advanced engines. A typicaltwo-layer TBC system consists of a ZrO__-Y:O3 ceramic topcoating and an oxidation-resistant metallic bond coat. Thesethermal barrier coating systems can be applied to the metalsubstrate either by plasma spray or by electron beam physical-vapor-deposition (EB-PVD) techniques. Figure 2 showsTBC coated engine components-a Turbine vane and a dieselengine piston.Durability issues of these thermal barrier coatings underhigh temperature cyclic conditions are still of major concern.especially as future engine temperatures increase. The coatingdelamination failure is closely related to thermal stresses in thecoating systems, and oxidation of the bond coat and substrate.Coating shrinkage cracking and ceramic modulus increaseresulting from ceramic sintering and creep at hightemperatures can further accelerate the coating failure process.In general, the coating failure can occur when the failuredriving force is greater than the resistance IFigure 3). Note thatin a TBC system, coating delamination driving Iorce increaseswhereas the resistance decreases with time due to time- andtemperature- dependent processes. In order to fully utilize theTBC potential capabilities by taking into account manycomplex parameters and interactions, Advanced coating designtools are of necessity. It is of great importance to establishcoating life prediction models and to incorporate the dynamicthermo-mechanical and thermo-physical property infi_rmationduring service, as well as the failure mechanisms under near-realistic transient and steady state temperature and stressgradients encountered in the engine.The purpose of this paper is to address some of thecritical issues such as ceramic sintering and creep, bond coatoxidation, thermal fatigue and their relevance to coating lifeprediction. Experimental testing techniques have beendeveloped to characterize these thermal barrier coatingproperties and to investigate the coating failure mechanisms.Emphasis is placed on the dynamic changes of the coatingthermal conductivity and elastic modulus, fatigue and creepinteractions, and resulting failure mechanisms during thesimulated engine tests.NASA/TM–1999-209453 1

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  • Plasma-Spraying Ceramics Onto Smooth Metallic Substrates
    , 1992
    Co-Authors: Robert A. Miller, William J. Brindley, Carl J. Rouge, George W. Leissler

    Abstract:

    In fabrication process, plasma-sprayed ceramic coats bonded strongly to smooth metallic surfaces. Principal use of such coats in protecting metal parts in hot-Gas paths of Advanced Gas Turbine engines. Process consists of application of initial thin layer of ceramic on smooth surface by low-pressure-plasma spraying followed by application of layer of conventional, low-thermal-conductivity atmospheric-pressure plasma-sprayed ceramic.

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