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Piyush Sabharwall – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • comparative analysis of compact heat exchangers for application as the intermediate heat exchanger for Advanced Nuclear Reactors
    Annals of Nuclear Energy, 2015
    Co-Authors: N Bartel, Minghui Chen, Vivek Utgikar, Richard N Christensen, Piyush Sabharwall

    Abstract:

    Abstract A comparative evaluation of alternative compact heat exchanger designs for use as the intermediate heat exchanger in Advanced Nuclear Reactor systems is presented in this article. Candidate heat exchangers investigated included the Printed circuit heat exchanger (PCHE) and offset strip-fin heat exchanger (OSFHE). Both these heat exchangers offer high surface area to volume ratio (a measure of compactness [m2/m3]), high thermal effectiveness, and overall low pressure drop. Helium–helium heat exchanger designs for different heat exchanger types were developed for a 600 MW thermal Advanced Nuclear Reactor. The wavy channel PCHE with a 15° pitch angle was found to offer optimum combination of heat transfer coefficient, compactness and pressure drop as compared to other alternatives. The principles of the comparative analysis presented here will be useful for heat exchanger evaluations in other applications as well.

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  • development of a multi loop flow and heat transfer facility for Advanced Nuclear Reactor thermal hydraulic and hybrid energy system studies
    ASME 2014 International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, 2014
    Co-Authors: James E Obrien, Piyush Sabharwall, Sujong Yoon

    Abstract:

    A new high-temperature multi-fluid, multi-loop test facility for Advanced Nuclear applications is under development at the Idaho National Laboratory. The facility will include three flow loops: high-temperature helium, molten salt, and steam/water. Molten salts have been identified as excellent candidate heat transport fluids for primary or secondary coolant loops, supporting Advanced high temperature and small modular Reactors (SMRs). Details of some of the design aspects and challenges of this facility, which is currently in the conceptual design phase, are discussed. A preliminary design configuration will be presented, with the required characteristics of the various components. The loop will utilize Advanced high-temperature compact printed-circuit heat exchangers (PCHEs) operating at prototypic intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) conditions. The initial configuration will include a high-temperature (750°C), high-pressure (7 MPa) helium loop thermally integrated with a molten fluoride salt (KF-ZrF4) flow loop operating at low pressure (0.2 MPa) at a temperature of ∼450°C. Experiment design challenges include identification of suitable materials and components that will withstand the required loop operating conditions. Corrosion and high temperature creep behavior are major considerations. The facility will include a thermal energy storage capability designed to support scaled process heat delivery for a variety of hybrid energy systems and grid stabilization strategies. Experimental results obtained from this research will also provide important data for code verification and validation (V&V) related to these systems.Copyright © 2014 by ASME

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  • Advanced Reactors Thermal Energy Transport for Process Industries
    , 2014
    Co-Authors: Piyush Sabharwall, S.j. Yoon, M.g. Mckellar, Carl M. Stoots, George Griffith

    Abstract:

    The operation temperature of Advanced Nuclear Reactors is generally higher than commercial light water Reactors and thermal energy from Advanced Nuclear Reactor can be used for various purposes such as liquid fuel production, district heating, desalination, hydrogen production, and other process heat applications, etc. Some of the major technology challenges that must be overcome before the Advanced Reactors could be licensed on the Reactor side are qualification of next generation of Nuclear fuel, materials that can withstand higher temperature, improvement in power cycle thermal efficiency by going to combined cycles, SCO2 cycles, successful demonstration of Advanced compact heat exchangers in the prototypical conditions, and from the process side application the challenge is to transport the thermal energy from the Reactor to the process plant with maximum efficiency (i.e., with minimum temperature drop). The main focus of this study is on doing a parametric study of efficient heat transport system, with different coolants (mainly, water, He, and molten salts) to determine maximum possible distance that can be achieved.

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Kramer David – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • DOE’s Advanced Nuclear Reactor program deemed ineffective
    Physics Today, 2017
    Co-Authors: Kramer David

    Abstract:

    According to a new review, the Office of Nuclear Energy has shifted its priorities too often and overspent on facility upkeep. According to a new review, the Office of Nuclear Energy has shifted its priorities too often and overspent on facility upkeep.

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  • doe s Advanced Nuclear Reactor program deemed ineffective
    , 2017
    Co-Authors: Kramer David

    Abstract:

    According to a new review, the Office of Nuclear Energy has shifted its priorities too often and overspent on facility upkeep. According to a new review, the Office of Nuclear Energy has shifted its priorities too often and overspent on facility upkeep.

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Carl M. Stoots – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Advanced Reactors Thermal Energy Transport for Process Industries
    , 2014
    Co-Authors: Piyush Sabharwall, S.j. Yoon, M.g. Mckellar, Carl M. Stoots, George Griffith

    Abstract:

    The operation temperature of Advanced Nuclear Reactors is generally higher than commercial light water Reactors and thermal energy from Advanced Nuclear Reactor can be used for various purposes such as liquid fuel production, district heating, desalination, hydrogen production, and other process heat applications, etc. Some of the major technology challenges that must be overcome before the Advanced Reactors could be licensed on the Reactor side are qualification of next generation of Nuclear fuel, materials that can withstand higher temperature, improvement in power cycle thermal efficiency by going to combined cycles, SCO2 cycles, successful demonstration of Advanced compact heat exchangers in the prototypical conditions, and from the process side application the challenge is to transport the thermal energy from the Reactor to the process plant with maximum efficiency (i.e., with minimum temperature drop). The main focus of this study is on doing a parametric study of efficient heat transport system, with different coolants (mainly, water, He, and molten salts) to determine maximum possible distance that can be achieved.

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  • high temperature electrolysis for large scale hydrogen and syngas production from Nuclear energy summary of system simulation and economic analyses
    International Journal of Hydrogen Energy, 2010
    Co-Authors: James E Obrien, Edwin A. Harvego, Michael G. Mckellar, Carl M. Stoots

    Abstract:

    A research and development program is under way at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to assess the technological and scale-up issues associated with the implementation of solid-oxide electrolysis cell technology for efficient high-temperature hydrogen production from steam. This work is supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, under the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. This paper will provide an overview of large-scale system modeling results and economic analyses that have been completed to date. System analysis results have been obtained using the commercial code UniSim, augmented with a custom high-temperature electrolyzer module. Economic analysis results were based on the DOE H2A analysis methodology. The process flow diagrams for the system simulations include an Advanced Nuclear Reactor as a source of high-temperature process heat, a power cycle and a coupled steam electrolysis loop. Several Reactor types and power cycles have been considered, over a range of Reactor outlet temperatures. Pure steam electrolysis for hydrogen production as well as coelectrolysis for syngas production from steam/carbon dioxide mixtures have both been considered. In addition, the feasibility of coupling the high-temperature electrolysis process to biomass and coal-based synthetic fuels production has been considered. These simulations demonstrate that the addition of supplementary Nuclear hydrogen to synthetic fuels production from any carbon source minimizes emissions of carbon dioxide during the production process.

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