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Simon Chapman – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • open source marketing camel cigarette brand marketing in the web 2 0 world
    Tobacco Control, 2009
    Co-Authors: Becky Freeman, Simon Chapman

    Abstract:

    Background: The international trend towards comprehensive Bans on tobacco Advertising has seen the tobacco industry become increasingly innovative in its approach to marketing. Further fuelling this innovation is the rapid evolution and accessibility of web-based technology. The internet, as a relatively unregulated marketing environment, provides many opportunities for tobacco companies to pursue their promotional ambitions. Methods: In this paper, “open source marketing” is considered as a vehicle that has been appropriated by the tobacco industry, through a case study of efforts to design the packaging for the Camel Signature Blends range of cigarettes. Four sources are used to explore this case study including a marketing literature search, a web-based content search via the Google search engine, interviews with Advertising trade informants and an analysis of the Camel brand website. Results: RJ Reynolds (RJR) has proven to be particularly innovative in designing cigarette packaging. RJR engaged with thousands of consumers through their Camel brand website to design four new cigarette flavours and packages. While the Camel Signature Blends packaging designs were subsequently modified for the retail market due to problems arising with their cartoon-like imagery, important lessons arise on how the internet blurs the line between marketing and market research. Conclusions: Open source marketing has the potential to exploit Advertising Ban loopholes and stretch legal definitions in order to generate positive word of mouth about tobacco products. There are also lessons in the open source marketing movement for more effective tobacco control measures including interactive social marketing campaigns and requiring plain packaging of tobacco products.

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  • the world s most hostile environment how the tobacco industry circumvented singapore s Advertising Ban
    Tobacco Control, 2004
    Co-Authors: Mary Assunta, Simon Chapman

    Abstract:

    Objective: To review how tobacco transnational companies conducted their business in the hostile environment of Singapore, attempting to counter some of the government’s tobacco control measures; to compare the Malaysian and the Singaporean governments’ stance on tobacco control and the direct bearing of this on the way the tobacco companies conduct their business.

    Methods: Systematic keyword and opportunistic website searches of formerly private internal industry documents.

    Results: The comprehensive prohibition on Advertising did not prevent the companies from Advertising cigarettes to Singaporeans. Both British American Tobacco and Philip Morris used Malaysian television to advertise into Singapore. To launch a new brand of cigarettes, Alpine, Philip Morris used a non-tobacco product, the Alpine wine cooler. Other creative strategies such as innovative packaging and display units at retailers were explored to overcome the restrictions. Philip Morris experimented with developing a prototype cigarette using aroma and sweetened tipping paper to target the young and health conscious. The industry sought to weaken the strong pack warnings. The industry distributed anti-smoking posters for youth to retailers but privately salivated over their market potential.

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Gerard Hastings – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • tobacco marketing awareness on youth smoking susceptibility and perceived prevalence before and after an Advertising Ban
    European Journal of Public Health, 2008
    Co-Authors: Crawford Moodie, Anne Marie Mackintosh, A Brown, Gerard Hastings

    Abstract:

    Background: The Tobacco Advertising and Promotion Act (TAPA) was implemented in the United Kingdom in 2003. This study is the first to assess its impact on young people, examining smoking susceptibility (intention to smoke among never smokers) and perceived prevalence across three British cross-sectional samples (aged 11–16) before and after the introduction of the Ban. Methods: Three in-home surveys ( n = 1078, 1121 and 1121) were conducted before (1999 and 2002) and after (2004) the implementation of the TAPA. Results: Significant declines in awareness of tobacco marketing and perceived prevalence occurred across the three waves. Higher levels of awareness and perceived prevalence were associated with increased susceptibility, but direct measures of susceptibility remained stable. Conclusions: The TAPA is protecting young people in United Kingdom from tobacco marketing and reducing perceived prevalence, both of which are linked to susceptibility. The stability of susceptibility across the three waves is probably best explained by both the partial implementation of TAPA at the final survey point and the time such effects take to emerge. The evidence from this and previous studies is, however, that, ultimately, they will appear.

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  • effects of the 2003 Advertising promotion Ban in the united kingdom on awareness of tobacco marketing findings from the international tobacco control itc four country survey
    Tobacco Control, 2006
    Co-Authors: Fiona Harris, Anne Marie Mackintosh, Susan Anderson, Gerard Hastings, Ron Borland, Geoffrey T Fong, David Hammond, K M Cummings

    Abstract:

    Background: In February 2003, a comprehensive Ban on tobacco promotion came into effect in the United Kingdom, which prohibited tobacco marketing through print and broadcast media, billboards, the internet, direct mail, product placement, promotions, free gifts, coupons and sponsorships. Objective: To investigate the impact of the UK’s comprehensive Ban on tobacco promotion on adult smokers’ awareness of tobacco marketing in the UK relative to Canada, the United States and Australia. Design: A total of 6762 adult smokers participated in two waves of a random digit dialled telephone survey across the four countries. Wave 1 was conducted before the UK Ban (October–December 2002) and Wave 2 was conducted after the UK Ban (May–September 2003). Key measures: Awareness of a range of forms of tobacco marketing. Results: Levels of tobacco promotion awareness declined significantly among smokers in the UK after implementation of the Advertising Ban. Declines in awareness were greater in those channels regulated by the new law and change in awareness of tobacco promotions was much greater in the UK than the other three countries not affected by the Ban. At least in the short term, there was no evidence that the law resulted in greater exposure to tobacco promotions in the few media channels not covered by the law. Notwithstanding the apparent success of the UK Advertising Ban and the controls in other countries, 9–22% of smokers in the four countries still reported noticing things that promoted smoking “often or very often” at Wave 2. Conclusions: The UK policy to Ban tobacco Advertising and promotion has significantly reduced exposure to pro-tobacco marketing influences. These findings support the effectiveness of comprehensive Bans on Advertising and promotion, as included in the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control.

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K M Cummings – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • effects of the 2003 Advertising promotion Ban in the united kingdom on awareness of tobacco marketing findings from the international tobacco control itc four country survey
    Tobacco Control, 2006
    Co-Authors: Fiona Harris, Anne Marie Mackintosh, Susan Anderson, Gerard Hastings, Ron Borland, Geoffrey T Fong, David Hammond, K M Cummings

    Abstract:

    Background: In February 2003, a comprehensive Ban on tobacco promotion came into effect in the United Kingdom, which prohibited tobacco marketing through print and broadcast media, billboards, the internet, direct mail, product placement, promotions, free gifts, coupons and sponsorships. Objective: To investigate the impact of the UK’s comprehensive Ban on tobacco promotion on adult smokers’ awareness of tobacco marketing in the UK relative to Canada, the United States and Australia. Design: A total of 6762 adult smokers participated in two waves of a random digit dialled telephone survey across the four countries. Wave 1 was conducted before the UK Ban (October–December 2002) and Wave 2 was conducted after the UK Ban (May–September 2003). Key measures: Awareness of a range of forms of tobacco marketing. Results: Levels of tobacco promotion awareness declined significantly among smokers in the UK after implementation of the Advertising Ban. Declines in awareness were greater in those channels regulated by the new law and change in awareness of tobacco promotions was much greater in the UK than the other three countries not affected by the Ban. At least in the short term, there was no evidence that the law resulted in greater exposure to tobacco promotions in the few media channels not covered by the law. Notwithstanding the apparent success of the UK Advertising Ban and the controls in other countries, 9–22% of smokers in the four countries still reported noticing things that promoted smoking “often or very often” at Wave 2. Conclusions: The UK policy to Ban tobacco Advertising and promotion has significantly reduced exposure to pro-tobacco marketing influences. These findings support the effectiveness of comprehensive Bans on Advertising and promotion, as included in the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control.

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