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Aedes taeniorhynchus

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Michael J. Turell – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

Scott C. Weaver – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

William C. Wilson – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Effect of Environmental Temperature on the Ability of Culex tarsalis and Aedes taeniorhynchus (Diptera: Culicidae) to Transmit Rift Valley Fever Virus.
    Vector borne and zoonotic diseases (Larchmont N.Y.), 2020
    Co-Authors: Michael J. Turell, Lee W. Cohnstaedt, William C. Wilson
    Abstract:

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) causes severe disease in domestic ungulates (cattle, goats, and sheep) and a febrile illness in humans (with ∼1% case fatality rate). This virus has been spreading geographically, and there is concern of it spreading to Europe or the Americas. Environmental temperature can significantly affect the ability of mosquitoes to transmit an arbovirus. However, these effects are not consistent among viruses or mosquito species. Therefore, we evaluated the effect of incubation temperatures ranging from 14°C to 30°C on infection and dissemination rates for Culex tarsalis and Aedes taeniorhynchus allowed to feed on hamsters infected with RVFV. Engorged mosquitoes were randomly allocated to cages and placed in incubators maintained at 14°C, 18°C, 22°C, 26°C, or 30°C. Although infection rates detected in Cx. tarsalis increased with increasing holding temperature, holding temperature had no effect on infection rates detected in Ae. taeniorhynchus. However, for both species, the percentage of mosquitoes with a disseminated infection after specific extrinsic incubation periods (4, 7, 10, 14, 17, or 21 days) increased with increasing incubation holding temperature, even after adjusting for the apparent increase in infection rate in Cx. tarsalis. The effects of environmental factors, such as ambient temperature, need to be taken into account when developing models for viral persistence and spread in nature.

Felio J Bello – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • estudios comparativos del ciclo de vida del mosquito Aedes taeniorhynchus diptera culicidae de dos colonias de la costa atlantica colombiana
    Biomedica, 1996
    Co-Authors: Claribell Hernandez, Víctor Alberto Olano, Felio J Bello, Felisa Duran, Cristina Ferro
    Abstract:

    This pilot study was carried out in the laboratory to establish whether the Aedes taeniorhynchus mosquito, found in Cartagena and Barranquilla, is really a single strain and if the colonisation process (cultured in the laboratory) influences the time taken in the developmental stages of this dipthera’s life cycle. Colonies were established with adult mosquitoes, both males and females, collected from sites close to the cities of Cartagena and Barranquilla.The insects were taxonomically identified and placed in Gerberg jars into which cupfuls of humid earth were introduced so that oviposition could take place. Six continuous generations were kept at an average temperature of 27°C and 80% average relative humidity. lmmature forms were fed with minced Ken-L; sugar solution was given to adults of both sexes and females were given a guinea pig to provide their blood intake. The duration of each stage of the biological cycle for each generation was recorded and these were analysed by means of the t-test for comparison of averages of independent samples. For larva (t=1 .SI) and pupa (k0.30) duration time for the two mosquito populations no significant differences were found; however, hatching time, when it occurred, was k4.21. No significant differences were found for pupa or for larva hatching duration time for the six generations of mosquito from Cartagena, but when significant differences in larval stage duration time were presented, they occurred from the fourth generation onwards. This pilot study’s results suggest that the Aedes taeniorhynchus mosquito from Cartagena and Barranquilla represents a sole species. Furthermore, it shows that its colonisation process, being that which involves the adaptation of this insect to the special conditions and have an influence on the duration of its biological cycle.

  • caracteristicas de una linea celular de crecimiento continuo de Aedes taeniorhynchus diptera culicidae
    Biomedica, 1996
    Co-Authors: Felio J Bello, Víctor Alberto Olano, Gloria Rey, Alberto Morales, Jaime A Rodriguez, Jorge Boschell, William Ramirez
    Abstract:

    A new cell line was established, LSB-AT793, from the embryonic tissues of the mosquito Aedes taeniorhynchus. The first subculture was iniciated in July 1993. Up to the present, October 1995, 360 passages have been performed. The culture media used for cell growth and maintenance was MMNP12, with a pH of 6.8 and a temperature of 28°C. The majority of cells in the confluent monolayers were epithelial-like. The characteristics of the karyotype species were recognized and the G and C-banding patterns were established. Also, the isoenzyme profiles of the cell line, using four differents systems, PGI, PGM, MPI and 6-PGDH, were determined which coincide with the isoenzyme patterns derived from pupae extracts. The isoenzyme profiles of this cell line was compared with the isoenzyme phenotype of Anopheles albimanus and with the clone C6136. It was shown that cells are free of bacteria and fungi. The frozen technique in liquid nitrogen was standarized. This technique has allowed the storage of a variety of subcultures in different passages.

  • Características de una línea celular de crecimiento continuo de Aedes taeniorhynchus (Diptera: Culicidae)
    Instituto Nacional de Salud, 1996
    Co-Authors: Felio J Bello, Gloria Rey, Alberto Morales, Jaime A Rodriguez, Jorge Boschell, Víctor A. Olano, William Ramirez
    Abstract:

    Se estableció una nueva línea celular, LSB-AT0793, a partir de tejidos embrionarios del mosquito Aedes taeniorhynchus. El primer subcultivo se inició en julio de 1993 y hasta la fecha, octubre de 1995, se han efectuado 360 pases. El medio de cultivo utilizado para el crecimiento y mantenimiento de las células fue MMNP12, con un pH de 6,8 y una temperatura promedio de 28°C. La mayoría de las células en las monocapas confluentes fueron de formas epitelioides. Se reconocieron las características del cariotipo de la especie y se establecieron los patrones de bandas C y G. Se determinaron los perfiles isoenzimáticos de la línea celular, utilizando cuatro sistemas diferentes: PGI, PGM, MPI y 6-PGDH, los cuales coincidieron con los patrones obtenidos a partir de extractos de pupas de la especie. También, se compararon los perfiles isoenzimáticos de la presente Iínea celular con los de Anopheles albimanus y con los del clon C6136. Se demostró que las células están libres de bacterias y hongos. Se estandarizó la técnica de congelación en nitrógeno líquido en donde se mantienen varios subcultivos en diferentes pases

Lee W. Cohnstaedt – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Effect of Environmental Temperature on the Ability of Culex tarsalis and Aedes taeniorhynchus (Diptera: Culicidae) to Transmit Rift Valley Fever Virus.
    Vector borne and zoonotic diseases (Larchmont N.Y.), 2020
    Co-Authors: Michael J. Turell, Lee W. Cohnstaedt, William C. Wilson
    Abstract:

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) causes severe disease in domestic ungulates (cattle, goats, and sheep) and a febrile illness in humans (with ∼1% case fatality rate). This virus has been spreading geographically, and there is concern of it spreading to Europe or the Americas. Environmental temperature can significantly affect the ability of mosquitoes to transmit an arbovirus. However, these effects are not consistent among viruses or mosquito species. Therefore, we evaluated the effect of incubation temperatures ranging from 14°C to 30°C on infection and dissemination rates for Culex tarsalis and Aedes taeniorhynchus allowed to feed on hamsters infected with RVFV. Engorged mosquitoes were randomly allocated to cages and placed in incubators maintained at 14°C, 18°C, 22°C, 26°C, or 30°C. Although infection rates detected in Cx. tarsalis increased with increasing holding temperature, holding temperature had no effect on infection rates detected in Ae. taeniorhynchus. However, for both species, the percentage of mosquitoes with a disseminated infection after specific extrinsic incubation periods (4, 7, 10, 14, 17, or 21 days) increased with increasing incubation holding temperature, even after adjusting for the apparent increase in infection rate in Cx. tarsalis. The effects of environmental factors, such as ambient temperature, need to be taken into account when developing models for viral persistence and spread in nature.