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Stewart, Harold S. – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • An analog study of the distribution of radiant energy from an Aerial Explosion occurring below a cloud overcast
    University of Rochester, 2017
    Co-Authors: Minott P. O., Stewart, Harold S.

    Abstract:

    Thesis (M.S.)–University of Rochester. College of Engineering and Applied Science. Institute of Optics, 1961.The purpose of this experiment was to determine the radiant energy which objects in the vicinity of an Explosion receive. The experiment analyzed the effects of Aerial Explosions which occur below an overcast of clouds. When an Aerial Explosion occurs on a cloudless day, nearly half of the radiant energy it releases radiates harmlessly into space. The remainder radiates toward the earth and is either absorbed or singly scattered into space. This type of Explosion exposes only those objects which are in direct line of sight. However, when an Explosion of equal yield occurs below an overcast of clouds, the half of the radiant energy which was formerly harmlessly radiated into space, is now diffusely scattered back towards the earth. In addition, the energy which was singly scattered from the earth strikes the overcast and is partially scattered back to earth. The result of these two effects is a multiple scattering which causes the exposure on objects near the Explosion to be greater than the exposure which would occur on a clear day. Also, in this case objects not directly exposed to the Explosion may be indirectly exposed by scattering from the cloud overcast. Figures 1 and 1(a) show the manner in which the energy from the Explosion is distributed. These diagrams show the paths of only a few rays. Because of the complex nature of the multiple scattering between the earth and cloud overcast, mathematical computation of the radiant energy received by objects in the vicinity of an Explosion was difficult. Due to this difficulty, an analog solution of the problem was used. Two planes were constructed and mounted in parallel to simulate the surfaces of the earth and cloud overcast. Between these planes, a small point source of light was placed to represent the Explosion. At points throughout this model of the Explosion and its environment, measurements of illumination were made. These measurements were correlated, by equations derived for this purpose, to the exposures which would occur in an actual Explosion

Minott P. O. – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • An analog study of the distribution of radiant energy from an Aerial Explosion occurring below a cloud overcast
    University of Rochester, 2017
    Co-Authors: Minott P. O., Stewart, Harold S.

    Abstract:

    Thesis (M.S.)–University of Rochester. College of Engineering and Applied Science. Institute of Optics, 1961.The purpose of this experiment was to determine the radiant energy which objects in the vicinity of an Explosion receive. The experiment analyzed the effects of Aerial Explosions which occur below an overcast of clouds. When an Aerial Explosion occurs on a cloudless day, nearly half of the radiant energy it releases radiates harmlessly into space. The remainder radiates toward the earth and is either absorbed or singly scattered into space. This type of Explosion exposes only those objects which are in direct line of sight. However, when an Explosion of equal yield occurs below an overcast of clouds, the half of the radiant energy which was formerly harmlessly radiated into space, is now diffusely scattered back towards the earth. In addition, the energy which was singly scattered from the earth strikes the overcast and is partially scattered back to earth. The result of these two effects is a multiple scattering which causes the exposure on objects near the Explosion to be greater than the exposure which would occur on a clear day. Also, in this case objects not directly exposed to the Explosion may be indirectly exposed by scattering from the cloud overcast. Figures 1 and 1(a) show the manner in which the energy from the Explosion is distributed. These diagrams show the paths of only a few rays. Because of the complex nature of the multiple scattering between the earth and cloud overcast, mathematical computation of the radiant energy received by objects in the vicinity of an Explosion was difficult. Due to this difficulty, an analog solution of the problem was used. Two planes were constructed and mounted in parallel to simulate the surfaces of the earth and cloud overcast. Between these planes, a small point source of light was placed to represent the Explosion. At points throughout this model of the Explosion and its environment, measurements of illumination were made. These measurements were correlated, by equations derived for this purpose, to the exposures which would occur in an actual Explosion

O. Sadot – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Dust Lofting Behind Shock Waves: What Is the Dominate Lofting Mechanism?
    31st International Symposium on Shock Waves 1, 2019
    Co-Authors: Y. Leler, S. Pistinner, A. Yafe, O. Sadot

    Abstract:

    Blast waves formed by Aerial Explosion above dust and coal mine Explosion lift dust. The lofted dust particles couple to the flow field and are carried by it. The dust lofting phenomenon behind blast/shock waves is studied over seven decades. Yet, a clear identification of the dominated dust lofting mechanism behind blast and shock waves is still lacking.