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Kyros Yakinthos – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Design Optimization of Heat Exchangers for Aero Engines With the Use of a Surrogate Model Incorporating Performance Characteristics and Geometrical Constraints
    Volume 5C: Heat Transfer, 2018
    Co-Authors: Christina Salpingidou, Dimitrios Misirlis, Z. Vlahostergios, Michael Flouros, Fabian Donus, Kyros Yakinthos
    Abstract:

    The present work is focused on the optimization of the performance characteristics of a recuperator specifically designed for aero engine applications, targeting the reduction of specific fuel consumption and taking into consideration aero engine geometrical constraints and limitations. The recuperator design was based on the elliptically profiled tubular heat exchanger which was developed and invented by MTU Aero Engines AG. For the specific fuel consumption investigations the Intercooled Recuperated Aero engine cycle, combining both intercooling and recuperation, was considered. The optimization was performed with the development of a recuperator surrogate model, capable to incorporate major recuperator geometrical features. A large number of recuperator design scenarios was assessed, in which additional design criteria and constraints were applied. Thus, a significantly large recuperator design space was covered resulting to the identification of feasible recuperator designs providing beneficial effect on the Intercooled Recuperated Aero engine leading to reduced specific fuel consumption and weight.

  • Thermodynamic analysis of recuperative gas turbines and aero engines
    Applied Thermal Engineering, 2017
    Co-Authors: Christina Salpingidou, Dimitrios Misirlis, Z. Vlahostergios, Michael Flouros, Stefan Donnerhack, Apostolos Goulas, Kyros Yakinthos
    Abstract:

    Abstract In the current work, the thermodynamic cycle of a conventional recuperative aero engine, in which a heat exchanger is placed after the power turbturbine, is compared with the thermodynamic cycles of two non-conventional recuperative aero engine configurations. For each configuration, different heat exchanger designs were used, all having the same core arrangement as the heat exchanger in the conventional recuperation aero engine which was designed by MTU aero engines AG and has been initially used in the first concept of the Intercooled Recuperative Aero engine of MTU. The core of the heat exchangers is specially designed to enhance heat transfer and minimize pressure losses when used as a recuperator in aero engines. Regarding the non-conventional cycle configurations, the first one is referred to as ‘alternative recuperative’ cycle, where a heat exchanger is placed between the high pressure and the power turbturbine, while the second one is referred to as ‘staged heat recovery’ where two heat exchangers are employed, one between the high and power turbines and the second one at the exhaust, downstream the power turbturbine. The comparison is based on the efficiencies and the thrust specific fuel consumption of each thermodynamic cycle. The performance characteristics of the heat exchangers were defined from previous experimental measurements and computational fluifluid dynamics. For all the examined configurations, the aero engine geometrical constrains were taken into consideration, especially for the alternative recuperative cycle. The results of the study showed that the alternative recuperative and the staged heat recovery cycles were more efficient than the conventional recuperative cycle for a specific range of pressure ratios and heat exchangers characteristics. These cycles combined with appropriate geometrical adaptations and with advanced, temperature resistant ceramics, alloys and other materials have the potential to further optimize the waste heat management exploitation in aero engines.

Ye Jia-jia – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Aero-engine Faults Diagnosis Based on Wavelet Packet Analysis
    Computer Simulation, 2010
    Co-Authors: Ye Jia-jia
    Abstract:

    It is difficult to identify various faults of Aero-engine.To make the common Aero-engine faults detection correctly and quickly,on basis of analyzing the Aero-engine fault characters,time domain indexes of engine vibration signals are used to judge the work of engine,then wavelet packets are used to transform the Aero-engine vibration signals which have failure in frequency domain and make frequency band energy diagram to identify faults.According to this method,the ibration signal of one turbofan in-flight shut-down failure is analyzed,and the fault is recognized accurately.It shows that using this method to do Aero-engine faults diagnosis is simple,intuitionistic,and has practical value.

Jiang Dongxiang – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Fault Analysis and Simulation for Aero-Engine
    Computer Simulation, 2012
    Co-Authors: Jiang Dongxiang
    Abstract:

    Aero-engine determines the performance and the security of the plane as its nucleus.In the event of a fault,it possibly results in a nasty accident with much loss of lives and economy.In this paper,based on the aero-engine’s mathematic model and vibration-symptom relationship matrix,the common aero-engine gas path faults and vibrations faults were analyzed and simulated to obtain the faults’ characteristics.The purposes are guaranteeing the safe operating and offering basis for aero-engine fault diagnosis and predictions.

Michael Flouros – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Design Optimization of Heat Exchangers for Aero Engines With the Use of a Surrogate Model Incorporating Performance Characteristics and Geometrical Constraints
    Volume 5C: Heat Transfer, 2018
    Co-Authors: Christina Salpingidou, Dimitrios Misirlis, Z. Vlahostergios, Michael Flouros, Fabian Donus, Kyros Yakinthos
    Abstract:

    The present work is focused on the optimization of the performance characteristics of a recuperator specifically designed for aero engine applications, targeting the reduction of specific fuel consumption and taking into consideration aero engine geometrical constraints and limitations. The recuperator design was based on the elliptically profiled tubular heat exchanger which was developed and invented by MTU Aero Engines AG. For the specific fuel consumption investigations the Intercooled Recuperated Aero engine cycle, combining both intercooling and recuperation, was considered. The optimization was performed with the development of a recuperator surrogate model, capable to incorporate major recuperator geometrical features. A large number of recuperator design scenarios was assessed, in which additional design criteria and constraints were applied. Thus, a significantly large recuperator design space was covered resulting to the identification of feasible recuperator designs providing beneficial effect on the Intercooled Recuperated Aero engine leading to reduced specific fuel consumption and weight.

  • Thermodynamic analysis of recuperative gas turbines and aero engines
    Applied Thermal Engineering, 2017
    Co-Authors: Christina Salpingidou, Dimitrios Misirlis, Z. Vlahostergios, Michael Flouros, Stefan Donnerhack, Apostolos Goulas, Kyros Yakinthos
    Abstract:

    Abstract In the current work, the thermodynamic cycle of a conventional recuperative aero engine, in which a heat exchanger is placed after the power turbine, is compared with the thermodynamic cycles of two non-conventional recuperative aero engine configurations. For each configuration, different heat exchanger designs were used, all having the same core arrangement as the heat exchanger in the conventional recuperation aero engine which was designed by MTU aero engines AG and has been initially used in the first concept of the Intercooled Recuperative Aero engine of MTU. The core of the heat exchangers is specially designed to enhance heat transfer and minimize pressure losses when used as a recuperator in aero engines. Regarding the non-conventional cycle configurations, the first one is referred to as ‘alternative recuperative’ cycle, where a heat exchanger is placed between the high pressure and the power turbine, while the second one is referred to as ‘staged heat recovery’ where two heat exchangers are employed, one between the high and power turbines and the second one at the exhaust, downstream the power turbine. The comparison is based on the efficiencies and the thrust specific fuel consumption of each thermodynamic cycle. The performance characteristics of the heat exchangers were defined from previous experimental measurements and computational fluid dynamics. For all the examined configurations, the aero engine geometrical constrains were taken into consideration, especially for the alternative recuperative cycle. The results of the study showed that the alternative recuperative and the staged heat recovery cycles were more efficient than the conventional recuperative cycle for a specific range of pressure ratios and heat exchangers characteristics. These cycles combined with appropriate geometrical adaptations and with advanced, temperature resistant ceramics, alloys and other materials have the potential to further optimize the waste heat management exploitation in aero engines.

  • analytical and numerical simulations of the two phase flow heat transfer in the vent and scavenge pipes of the clean engine demonstrator
    Journal of Turbomachinery-transactions of The Asme, 2008
    Co-Authors: Michael Flouros
    Abstract:

    Advanced aircraft engiengine development dictates high standards of reliability for the lubrication systems, not only in terms of the proper lubrication of the bearings and the gears, but also in terms of the removal of the large amounts of the generated heat. Heat is introduced both internally through the rotating hardware and externally through radiation, conduction, and convection. In case where the bearing chamber is in close proximity to the engine’s hot section, the external heat flux may be significant. This is, for example, the case when oil pipes pass through the turbine struts and vanes on their way to the bearing chamber. There, the thermal impact is extremely high, not only because of the hot turbine gases flowing around the vanes, but also because of the hot cooling air, which is ingested into the vanes. The impact of this excessive heat on the oil may lead to severe engine safety and reliability problems, which can range from oil coking with blockage of the oil tubes to oil fires with loss of part integrity, damage, or even failure of the engine. It is therefore of great importance that the oil system designer is capable of predicting the system’s functionality. As part of the European Research program efficient and environmentally friendly aero-engine, the project component validator for environmentally friendly aero-engine (Wilfert, et al., 2005, “CLEAN-Validation of a GTF High Speed Turbine and Integration of Heat Exchanger Technology in an Environmental Friendly Engine Concept, ” International Symposium on Air Breathing Engines, Paper No. ISABE-2005-1156; Gerlach et al., 2005, “CLEAN-Bench Adaptation and Test for a Complex Demo Engine Concept at ILA Stuttgart,” International Symposium on Air Breathing Engines, Paper No. ISABE-2005-1134) was initiated with the goal to develop future engine technologies. Within the scope of this program, MTU Aero Engines has designed the lubrication system and has initiated an investigation of the heat transfer in the scavenge and vent tubes passing through the high thermally loaded turbine center frame (TCF). The objective was to evaluate analytical and numerical models for the heat transfer into the air and oil mixtures and benchmark them. Three analytical models were investigated. A model that was based on the assumption that the flow of air and oil is a homogeneous mixture, which was applied on the scavenge flow. The other two models assumed annular two-phase flows and were applied on the vent flows. Additionally, the two-phasphase flow in the scavenge and vent pipes was simulated numerically using the ANSYS CFX package. The evaluation of the models was accomplished with test data from the heavily instrumented test engine with special emphasis on the TCF. Both the analytical and the numerical models have demonstrated strengths and weaknesses. The homogeneous flowflow model correlation and the most recent correlation by Busam for vent flows have demonstrated very good agreement between test and computed results. On the other hand the numerical analysis produced remarkable results, however, at the expense of significant modeling and computing efforts. This particular work is unique compared with published investigations since it was conducted in a real engine environment and not in a simulating rig. Nevertheless, research in two-phasphase flow heat transfer will continue in order to mitigate any deficiencies and to further improve the correlations and the CFD tools.

Christina Salpingidou – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Design Optimization of Heat Exchangers for Aero Engines With the Use of a Surrogate Model Incorporating Performance Characteristics and Geometrical Constraints
    Volume 5C: Heat Transfer, 2018
    Co-Authors: Christina Salpingidou, Dimitrios Misirlis, Z. Vlahostergios, Michael Flouros, Fabian Donus, Kyros Yakinthos
    Abstract:

    The present work is focused on the optimization of the performance characteristics of a recuperator specifically designed for aero engine applications, targeting the reduction of specific fuel consumption and taking into consideration aero engine geometrical constraints and limitations. The recuperator design was based on the elliptically profiled tubular heat exchanger which was developed and invented by MTU Aero Engines AG. For the specific fuel consumption investigations the Intercooled Recuperated Aero engine cycle, combining both intercooling and recuperation, was considered. The optimization was performed with the development of a recuperator surrogate model, capable to incorporate major recuperator geometrical features. A large number of recuperator design scenarios was assessed, in which additional design criteria and constraints were applied. Thus, a significantly large recuperator design space was covered resulting to the identification of feasible recuperator designs providing beneficial effect on the Intercooled Recuperated Aero engine leading to reduced specific fuel consumption and weight.

  • Thermodynamic analysis of recuperative gas turbines and aero engines
    Applied Thermal Engineering, 2017
    Co-Authors: Christina Salpingidou, Dimitrios Misirlis, Z. Vlahostergios, Michael Flouros, Stefan Donnerhack, Apostolos Goulas, Kyros Yakinthos
    Abstract:

    Abstract In the current work, the thermodynamic cycle of a conventional recuperative aero engine, in which a heat exchanger is placed after the power turbine, is compared with the thermodynamic cycles of two non-conventional recuperative aero engine configurations. For each configuration, different heat exchanger designs were used, all having the same core arrangement as the heat exchanger in the conventional recuperation aero engine which was designed by MTU aero engines AG and has been initially used in the first concept of the Intercooled Recuperative Aero engine of MTU. The core of the heat exchangers is specially designed to enhance heat transfer and minimize pressure losses when used as a recuperator in aero engines. Regarding the non-conventional cycle configurations, the first one is referred to as ‘alternative recuperative’ cycle, where a heat exchanger is placed between the high pressure and the power turbine, while the second one is referred to as ‘staged heat recovery’ where two heat exchangers are employed, one between the high and power turbines and the second one at the exhaust, downstream the power turbine. The comparison is based on the efficiencies and the thrust specific fuel consumption of each thermodynamic cycle. The performance characteristics of the heat exchangers were defined from previous experimental measurements and computational fluid dynamics. For all the examined configurations, the aero engine geometrical constrains were taken into consideration, especially for the alternative recuperative cycle. The results of the study showed that the alternative recuperative and the staged heat recovery cycles were more efficient than the conventional recuperative cycle for a specific range of pressure ratios and heat exchangers characteristics. These cycles combined with appropriate geometrical adaptations and with advanced, temperature resistant ceramics, alloys and other materials have the potential to further optimize the waste heat management exploitation in aero engines.