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Narpat Singh Shekhawat – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Aeroponics for adventitious rhizogenesis in evergreen haloxeric tree Tamarix aphylla (L.) Karst.: influence of exogenous auxins and cutting type
    Physiology and Molecular Biology of Plants, 2017
    Co-Authors: Udit Sharma, Vinod Kataria, Narpat Singh Shekhawat
    Abstract:

    Tamarix aphylla (L.) Karst., a drought resistant halophyte tree, is an agroforestry species which can be used for reclamation of waterlogged saline and marginal lands. Due to very low seed viability and unsuitable conditions for seed germgermination, the tree is becoming rare in Indian Thar desert. Present study concerns the evaluation of Aeroponics technique for vegetative propagation of T. aphylla. Effect of various exogenous auxins (indole-3-acetic acid, indole-3-butyric acid, naphthalene acetic acid) at different concentrations (0.0, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 5.0, 10.0 mg l−1) was examined for induction of adventitious rooting and other morphological features. Among all three auxins tested individually, maximum rooting response (79%) was observed with IBA 2.0 mg l−1. However, stem cuttings treated with a combination of auxins (2.0 mg l−1 IBA and 1.0 mg l−1 IAA) for 15 min resulted in 87% of rooting response. Among three types of stem cuttings (apical shoot, newly sprouted cuttings, mature stem cuttings), maximum rooting (~ 90%) was observed on mature stem cuttings. Number of roots and root length were significantly higher in aeroponically rooted stem cuttings as compared to stem cuttings rooted in soil conditions. Successfully rooted and sprouted plants were transferred to polybags with 95% survival rate. This is the first report on aeroponic culture of Tamarix aphylla which can be utilized in agroforestry practices, marginal land reclamation and physiological studies.

  • Evaluation of Aeroponics for clonal propagation of Caralluma edulis, Leptadenia reticulata and Tylophora indica – three threatened medicinal Asclepiads
    Physiology and molecular biology of plants : an international journal of functional plant biology, 2014
    Co-Authors: Pooja Mehandru, Narpat Singh Shekhawat, Vinod Kataria, Manoj K. Rai, H. S. Gehlot
    Abstract:

    The present study explores the potential of aeroponic system for clonal propagation of Caralluma edulis (Paimpa) a rare, threatened and endemic edible species, Leptadenia reticulata (Jeewanti), a threatened liana used as promoter of health and Tylophora indica (Burm.f.) Merill, a valuable medicinal climber. Experiments were conducted to asses the effect of exogenous auxin (naphthalene acetic acid, indole-3-butyric acid, indole-3-acetic acid) and auxin concentrations (0.0, 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5gl(-1)) on various root morphological traits of cuttings in the aeroponic chamber. Amongst all the auxins tested, significant effects on the length, number and percentage of rooting was observed in IBA treated nodal cuttings. Cent per cent of the stem cuttings of C. edulis rooted if pre-treated with 2.0 gl(-1) of IBA for 5 min while 97.7 % of the stem cuttings of L. reticulata and 93.33 % of stem cuttings of Tylophora indica rooted with pre-treatment of 3.0 gl(-1) of IBA for 5 min. Presence of at least two leaves on the nodal cuttings of L. reticulata and T. indica was found to be a prerequisite for root induction. In all the species, the number of adventitious roots per cutting and the percentage of cuttings rooted aeroponically were significantly higher than the soil grown stem cuttings. Shoot growth measured in terms of shoot length was significantly higher in cuttings rooted aeroponically as compared to the cuttings rooted under soil conditions. All the plants sprouted and rooted aeroponically survived on transfer to soil. This is the first report of clonal propagation in an aeroponic system for these plants. This study suggests Aeroponics as an economic method for rapid root induction and clonal propagation of these three endangered and medicinally important plants which require focused efforts on conservation and sustainable utilization.

  • evaluation of Aeroponics for clonal propagation of caralluma edulis leptadenia reticulata and tylophora indica three threatened medicinal asclepiads
    Physiology and Molecular Biology of Plants, 2014
    Co-Authors: Pooja Mehandru, Narpat Singh Shekhawat, Vinod Kataria, Manoj K. Rai, H. S. Gehlot
    Abstract:

    The present study explores the potential of aeroponic system for clonal propagation of Caralluma edulis (Paimpa) a rare, threatened and endemic edible species, Leptadenia reticulata (Jeewanti), a threatened liana used as promoter of health and Tylophora indica (Burm.f.) Merill, a valuable medicinal climber. Experiments were conducted to asses the effect of exogenous auxin (naphthalene acetic acid, indole-3-butyric acid, indole-3-acetic acid) and auxin concentrations (0.0, 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5gl−1) on various root morphological traits of cuttings in the aeroponic chamber. Amongst all the auxins tested, significant effects on the length, number and percentage of rooting was observed in IBA treated nodal cuttings. Cent per cent of the stem cuttings of C. edulis rooted if pre-treated with 2.0 gl−1 of IBA for 5 min while 97.7 % of the stem cuttings of L. reticulata and 93.33 % of stem cuttings of Tylophora indica rooted with pre-treatment of 3.0 gl−1 of IBA for 5 min. Presence of at least two leaves on the nodal cuttings of L. reticulata and T. indica was found to be a prerequisite for root induction. In all the species, the number of adventitious roots per cutting and the percentage of cuttings rooted aeroponically were significantly higher than the soil grown stem cuttings. Shoot growth measured in terms of shoot length was significantly higher in cuttings rooted aeroponically as compared to the cuttings rooted under soil conditions. All the plants sprouted and rooted aeroponically survived on transfer to soil. This is the first report of clonal propagation in an aeroponic system for these plants. This study suggests Aeroponics as an economic method for rapid root induction and clonal propagation of these three endangered and medicinally important plants which require focused efforts on conservation and sustainable utilization.

José M. Grünzweig – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Root-shoot allometry of tropical forest trees determined in a large-scale aeroponic system.
    Annals of botany, 2012
    Co-Authors: Amram Eshel, José M. Grünzweig
    Abstract:

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS This study is a first step in a multi-stage project aimed at determining allometric relationships among the tropical tree organs, and carbon fluxes between the various tree parts and their environment. Information on canopy-root interrelationships is needed to improve understanding of above- and below-ground processes and for modelling of the regional and global carbon cycle. Allometric relationships between the sizes of different plant parts will be determined. METHODS Two tropical forest species were used in this study: Ceiba pentandra (kapok), a fast-growing tree native to South and Central America and to Western Africa, and Khaya anthotheca (African mahogany), a slower-growing tree native to Central and Eastern Africa. Growth and allometric parameters of 12-month-old saplings grown in a large-scale aeroponic system and in 50-L soil containers were compared. The main advantage of growing plants in Aeroponics is that their root systems are fully accessible throughout the plant life, and can be fully recovered for harvesting. KEY RESULTS The expected differences in shoot and root size between the fast-growing C. pentandra and the slower-growing K. anthotheca were evident in both growth systems. Roots were recovered from the aeroponically grown saplings only, and their distribution among various diameter classes followed the patterns expected from the literature. Stem, branch and leaf allometric parameters were similar for saplings of each species grown in the two systems. CONCLUSIONS The aeroponic tree growth system can be utilized for determining the basic allometric relationships between root and shoot components of these trees, and hence can be used to study carbon allocation and fluxes of whole above- and below-ground tree parts.

H. S. Gehlot – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Evaluation of Aeroponics for clonal propagation of Caralluma edulis, Leptadenia reticulata and Tylophora indica – three threatened medicinal Asclepiads
    Physiology and molecular biology of plants : an international journal of functional plant biology, 2014
    Co-Authors: Pooja Mehandru, Narpat Singh Shekhawat, Vinod Kataria, Manoj K. Rai, H. S. Gehlot
    Abstract:

    The present study explores the potential of aeroponic system for clonal propagation of Caralluma edulis (Paimpa) a rare, threatened and endemic edible species, Leptadenia reticulata (Jeewanti), a threatened liana used as promoter of health and Tylophora indica (Burm.f.) Merill, a valuable medicinal climber. Experiments were conducted to asses the effect of exogenous auxin (naphthalene acetic acid, indole-3-butyric acid, indole-3-acetic acid) and auxin concentrations (0.0, 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5gl(-1)) on various root morphological traits of cuttings in the aeroponic chamber. Amongst all the auxins tested, significant effects on the length, number and percentage of rooting was observed in IBA treated nodal cuttings. Cent per cent of the stem cuttings of C. edulis rooted if pre-treated with 2.0 gl(-1) of IBA for 5 min while 97.7 % of the stem cuttings of L. reticulata and 93.33 % of stem cuttings of Tylophora indica rooted with pre-treatment of 3.0 gl(-1) of IBA for 5 min. Presence of at least two leaves on the nodal cuttings of L. reticulata and T. indica was found to be a prerequisite for root induction. In all the species, the number of adventitious roots per cutting and the percentage of cuttings rooted aeroponically were significantly higher than the soil grown stem cuttings. Shoot growth measured in terms of shoot length was significantly higher in cuttings rooted aeroponically as compared to the cuttings rooted under soil conditions. All the plants sprouted and rooted aeroponically survived on transfer to soil. This is the first report of clonal propagation in an aeroponic system for these plants. This study suggests Aeroponics as an economic method for rapid root induction and clonal propagation of these three endangered and medicinally important plants which require focused efforts on conservation and sustainable utilization.

  • evaluation of Aeroponics for clonal propagation of caralluma edulis leptadenia reticulata and tylophora indica three threatened medicinal asclepiads
    Physiology and Molecular Biology of Plants, 2014
    Co-Authors: Pooja Mehandru, Narpat Singh Shekhawat, Vinod Kataria, Manoj K. Rai, H. S. Gehlot
    Abstract:

    The present study explores the potential of aeroponic system for clonal propagation of Caralluma edulis (Paimpa) a rare, threatened and endemic edible species, Leptadenia reticulata (Jeewanti), a threatened liana used as promoter of health and Tylophora indica (Burm.f.) Merill, a valuable medicinal climber. Experiments were conducted to asses the effect of exogenous auxin (naphthalene acetic acid, indole-3-butyric acid, indole-3-acetic acid) and auxin concentrations (0.0, 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5gl−1) on various root morphological traits of cuttings in the aeroponic chamber. Amongst all the auxins tested, significant effects on the length, number and percentage of rooting was observed in IBA treated nodal cuttings. Cent per cent of the stem cuttings of C. edulis rooted if pre-treated with 2.0 gl−1 of IBA for 5 min while 97.7 % of the stem cuttings of L. reticulata and 93.33 % of stem cuttings of Tylophora indica rooted with pre-treatment of 3.0 gl−1 of IBA for 5 min. Presence of at least two leaves on the nodal cuttings of L. reticulata and T. indica was found to be a prerequisite for root induction. In all the species, the number of adventitious roots per cutting and the percentage of cuttings rooted aeroponically were significantly higher than the soil grown stem cuttings. Shoot growth measured in terms of shoot length was significantly higher in cuttings rooted aeroponically as compared to the cuttings rooted under soil conditions. All the plants sprouted and rooted aeroponically survived on transfer to soil. This is the first report of clonal propagation in an aeroponic system for these plants. This study suggests Aeroponics as an economic method for rapid root induction and clonal propagation of these three endangered and medicinally important plants which require focused efforts on conservation and sustainable utilization.

Amram Eshel – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Root-shoot allometry of tropical forest trees determined in a large-scale aeroponic system.
    Annals of botany, 2012
    Co-Authors: Amram Eshel, José M. Grünzweig
    Abstract:

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS This study is a first step in a multi-stage project aimed at determining allometric relationships among the tropical tree organs, and carbon fluxes between the various tree parts and their environment. Information on canopy-root interrelationships is needed to improve understanding of above- and below-ground processes and for modelling of the regional and global carbon cycle. Allometric relationships between the sizes of different plant parts will be determined. METHODS Two tropical forest species were used in this study: Ceiba pentandra (kapok), a fast-growing tree native to South and Central America and to Western Africa, and Khaya anthotheca (African mahogany), a slower-growing tree native to Central and Eastern Africa. Growth and allometric parameters of 12-month-old saplings grown in a large-scale aeroponic system and in 50-L soil containers were compared. The main advantage of growing plants in Aeroponics is that their root systems are fully accessible throughout the plant life, and can be fully recovered for harvesting. KEY RESULTS The expected differences in shoot and root size between the fast-growing C. pentandra and the slower-growing K. anthotheca were evident in both growth systems. Roots were recovered from the aeroponically grown saplings only, and their distribution among various diameter classes followed the patterns expected from the literature. Stem, branch and leaf allometric parameters were similar for saplings of each species grown in the two systems. CONCLUSIONS The aeroponic tree growth system can be utilized for determining the basic allometric relationships between root and shoot components of these trees, and hence can be used to study carbon allocation and fluxes of whole above- and below-ground tree parts.

  • PART OF A SPECIAL ISSUE ON MATCHING ROOTS TO THEIR ENVIRONMENT Root-shoot allometry of tropical forest trees determined in a large-scale aeroponic system
    , 2012
    Co-Authors: Amram Eshel
    Abstract:

    †Background and Aims This study is a first step in a multi-stage project aimed at determining allometric relationships among the tropical tree organs, and carbon fluxes between the various tree parts and their environment. Information on canopy‐root interrelationships is needed to improve understanding of above- and belowground processes and for modelling of the regional and global carbon cycle. Allometric relationships between the sizes of different plant parts will be determined. †Methods Two tropical forest species were used in this study: Ceiba pentandra (kapok), a fast-growing tree native to South and Central America and to Western Africa, and Khaya anthotheca (African mahogany), a slower-growing tree native to Central and Eastern Africa. Growth and allometric parameters of 12-month-old saplings grown in a large-scale aeroponic system and in 50-L soil containers were compared. The main advantage of growing plants in Aeroponics is that their root systems are fully accessible throughout the plant life, and can be fully recovered for harvesting. †Key Results The expected differences in shoot and root size between the fast-growing C. pentandra and the slower-growing K. anthotheca were evident in both growth systems. Roots were recovered from the aeroponically grown saplings only, and their distribution among various diameter classes followed the patterns expected from the literature. Stem, branch and leaf allometric parameters were similar for saplings of each species grown in the two systems. †Conclusions The aeroponic tree growth system can be utilized for determining the basic allometric relationships between root and shoot components of these trees, and hence can be used to study carbon allocation and fluxes of whole above- and below-ground tree parts.

Vinod Kataria – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Aeroponics for adventitious rhizogenesis in evergreen haloxeric tree Tamarix aphylla (L.) Karst.: influence of exogenous auxins and cutting type
    Physiology and Molecular Biology of Plants, 2017
    Co-Authors: Udit Sharma, Vinod Kataria, Narpat Singh Shekhawat
    Abstract:

    Tamarix aphylla (L.) Karst., a drought resistant halophyte tree, is an agroforestry species which can be used for reclamation of waterlogged saline and marginal lands. Due to very low seed viability and unsuitable conditions for seed germination, the tree is becoming rare in Indian Thar desert. Present study concerns the evaluation of Aeroponics technique for vegetative propagation of T. aphylla. Effect of various exogenous auxins (indole-3-acetic acid, indole-3-butyric acid, naphthalene acetic acid) at different concentrations (0.0, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 5.0, 10.0 mg l−1) was examined for induction of adventitious rooting and other morphological features. Among all three auxins tested individually, maximum rooting response (79%) was observed with IBA 2.0 mg l−1. However, stem cuttings treated with a combination of auxins (2.0 mg l−1 IBA and 1.0 mg l−1 IAA) for 15 min resulted in 87% of rooting response. Among three types of stem cuttings (apical shoot, newly sprouted cuttings, mature stem cuttings), maximum rooting (~ 90%) was observed on mature stem cuttings. Number of roots and root length were significantly higher in aeroponically rooted stem cuttings as compared to stem cuttings rooted in soil conditions. Successfully rooted and sprouted plants were transferred to polybags with 95% survival rate. This is the first report on aeroponic culture of Tamarix aphylla which can be utilized in agroforestry practices, marginal land reclamation and physiological studies.

  • Evaluation of Aeroponics for clonal propagation of Caralluma edulis, Leptadenia reticulata and Tylophora indica – three threatened medicinal Asclepiads
    Physiology and molecular biology of plants : an international journal of functional plant biology, 2014
    Co-Authors: Pooja Mehandru, Narpat Singh Shekhawat, Vinod Kataria, Manoj K. Rai, H. S. Gehlot
    Abstract:

    The present study explores the potential of aeroponic system for clonal propagation of Caralluma edulis (Paimpa) a rare, threatened and endemic edible species, Leptadenia reticulata (Jeewanti), a threatened liana used as promoter of health and Tylophora indica (Burm.f.) Merill, a valuable medicinal climber. Experiments were conducted to asses the effect of exogenous auxin (naphthalene acetic acid, indole-3-butyric acid, indole-3-acetic acid) and auxin concentrations (0.0, 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5gl(-1)) on various root morphological traits of cuttings in the aeroponic chamber. Amongst all the auxins tested, significant effects on the length, number and percentage of rooting was observed in IBA treated nodal cuttings. Cent per cent of the stem cuttings of C. edulis rooted if pre-treated with 2.0 gl(-1) of IBA for 5 min while 97.7 % of the stem cuttings of L. reticulata and 93.33 % of stem cuttings of Tylophora indica rooted with pre-treatment of 3.0 gl(-1) of IBA for 5 min. Presence of at least two leaves on the nodal cuttings of L. reticulata and T. indica was found to be a prerequisite for root induction. In all the species, the number of adventitious roots per cutting and the percentage of cuttings rooted aeroponically were significantly higher than the soil grown stem cuttings. Shoot growth measured in terms of shoot length was significantly higher in cuttings rooted aeroponically as compared to the cuttings rooted under soil conditions. All the plants sprouted and rooted aeroponically survived on transfer to soil. This is the first report of clonal propagation in an aeroponic system for these plants. This study suggests Aeroponics as an economic method for rapid root induction and clonal propagation of these three endangered and medicinally important plants which require focused efforts on conservation and sustainable utilization.

  • evaluation of Aeroponics for clonal propagation of caralluma edulis leptadenia reticulata and tylophora indica three threatened medicinal asclepiads
    Physiology and Molecular Biology of Plants, 2014
    Co-Authors: Pooja Mehandru, Narpat Singh Shekhawat, Vinod Kataria, Manoj K. Rai, H. S. Gehlot
    Abstract:

    The present study explores the potential of aeroponic system for clonal propagation of Caralluma edulis (Paimpa) a rare, threatened and endemic edible species, Leptadenia reticulata (Jeewanti), a threatened liana used as promoter of health and Tylophora indica (Burm.f.) Merill, a valuable medicinal climber. Experiments were conducted to asses the effect of exogenous auxin (naphthalene acetic acid, indole-3-butyric acid, indole-3-acetic acid) and auxin concentrations (0.0, 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5gl−1) on various root morphological traits of cuttings in the aeroponic chamber. Amongst all the auxins tested, significant effects on the length, number and percentage of rooting was observed in IBA treated nodal cuttings. Cent per cent of the stem cuttings of C. edulis rooted if pre-treated with 2.0 gl−1 of IBA for 5 min while 97.7 % of the stem cuttings of L. reticulata and 93.33 % of stem cuttings of Tylophora indica rooted with pre-treatment of 3.0 gl−1 of IBA for 5 min. Presence of at least two leaves on the nodal cuttings of L. reticulata and T. indica was found to be a prerequisite for root induction. In all the species, the number of adventitious roots per cutting and the percentage of cuttings rooted aeroponically were significantly higher than the soil grown stem cuttings. Shoot growth measured in terms of shoot length was significantly higher in cuttings rooted aeroponically as compared to the cuttings rooted under soil conditions. All the plants sprouted and rooted aeroponically survived on transfer to soil. This is the first report of clonal propagation in an aeroponic system for these plants. This study suggests Aeroponics as an economic method for rapid root induction and clonal propagation of these three endangered and medicinally important plants which require focused efforts on conservation and sustainable utilization.