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A.g. Fall – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Phylogenetic relationships and molecular delimitation of Culicoides Latreille (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) species in the Afrotropical Region: interest for the subgenus Avaritia
    Systematic Entomology, 2018
    Co-Authors: M. T. Bakhoum, K. Labuschagne, Karine Huber, M. Fall, B. Mathieu, G. Venter, Laetitia Gardes, Thierry Baldet, Jérémy Bouyer, A.g. Fall
    Abstract:

    Phylogenetic relationships of Culicoides species of the Afrotropical Region are problematic as different authors disagree on the placement of species into specific subgenera or groups. In this study we sequenced two mitochondrial (COI and 16S rDNA) and two nuclear (CAD and 28S rDNA) gene fragments to reconstruct phylogenetic relationships within the Avaritia, Remmia and Synhelea subgenera and the Milnei, Neavei and Similis groups of Culicoides using both Bayesian inference and maximum-likelihood approaches. Based on phylogenetic trees, we used the bGMYC (Bayesian General Mixed Yule Coalescent model) and the PTP (Bayesian Poisson Tree Processes) to investigate species boundaries. All species relationships within the studied subgenera and groups were well-supported by using morphological characters and molecular analyses. The subgenus Avaritia includes (i) all of the species of the Imicola group, as well as the putative new species, C.sp. #22, and we confirmed the monophyly of this group; (ii) the Dasyops group includes C.kanagai and C.sp. #54 Meiswinkel (new species), shown to be monophyletic; (iii) the C.sp. #20 belongs to the Orientalis group; (iv) C.grahamii, C.gulbenkiani and C. kibatiensis. Our results also show that subgenus Remmia is monophyletic. Relationships of species of the Milnei group were well-supported and demonstrate the monophyly of this group. Borkent’s classification for Similis group is confirmed. In addition, C.neavei and C.ovalis (Neavei group) are placed in the subgenus Synhelea.

  • Systematics and taxonomy of Culicoides Latreille (Ceratopogonidae) in the Afrotropical Region – what are the challenges and what comes next?
    , 2018
    Co-Authors: M. T. Bakhoum, A.g. Fall, Thierry Baldet, Jérémy Bouyer, Claire Garros
    Abstract:

    In the context of emergence or re-emergence of vector-borne diseases, several species of Culicoides Latreille are involved in the transmission of viruses and parasites, affecting animals and humans (respectively) in the Afrotropical Region. Rapid and reliable identification of vector species is required, but morphology based identification requires scarce taxonomic expertise. In addition, systematic and taxonomic classifications are problematic, as authors disagree on placement of certain species into specific subgenera or informal species-groups. Morphological identification of Culicoides larvae is also not possible. This study applied an integrative approach, applying both morphological and molecular criteria to revise the systematics and taxonomy of Culicoides species occurring in the Afrotropics, using a multi-marker molecular phylogeny and species delineation. DNA barcodes were also established for Afrotropical species and the DNA barcoding was tested for species identifications at the larval stage on a large number of samples collected from the Niayes area, Senegal. Results revealed: 1) a new species for science (provisionally named Culicoides sp. # 22) and affiliated to the subgenus Avaritia Fox; 2) the affiliation of the C. similis and C. neavei species-groups to the subgenus Synhelea Kieffer; and 3) the existence of cryptic species within C. oxystoma Kieffer in the subgenus Remmia Glukhova. This study proves the efficiency of DNA barcoding for studying Culicoides larval diversity. This offers opportunities for the monitoring of Culicoides and implementation of in-depth eco-epidemiological studies to better control Culicoides-borne diseases, such as African horse sickness in the Niayes Region, Senegal and in sub-Saharan Africa.

  • Phylogenetic relationships and molecular delimitation of Culicoides Latreille (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) species in the Afrotropical Region: interest for the subgenus Avaritia
    Systematic Entomology, 2017
    Co-Authors: M. T. Bakhoum, K. Labuschagne, Karine Huber, M. Fall, B. Mathieu, Laetitia Gardes, Thierry Baldet, Jérémy Bouyer, Gert J. Venter, A.g. Fall
    Abstract:

    Phylogenetic relationships of Culicoides species of the Afrotropical Region are problematic as different authors disagree on the placement of species into specific subgenera or groups. In this study we sequenced two mitochondrial (COI and 16S rDNA) and two nuclear (CAD and 28S rDNA) gene fragments to reconstruct phylogenetic relationships within the Avaritia, Remmia and Synhelea subgenera and the Milnei, Neavei and Similis groups of Culicoides using both Bayesian inference and maximum-likelihood approaches. Based on phylogenetic trees, we used the bGMYC (Bayesian General Mixed Yule Coalescent model) and the PTP (Bayesian Poisson Tree Processes) to investigate species boundaries. All species relationships within the studied subgenera and groups were well-supported by using morphological characters and molecular analyses. The subgenus Avaritia includes (i) all of the species of the Imicola group, as well as the putative new species, C. sp. #22, and we confirmed the monophyly of this group; (ii) the Dasyops group includes C. kanagai and C. sp. #54 Meiswinkel (new species), shown to be monophyletic; (iii) the C. sp. #20 belongs to the Orientalis group; (iv) C. grahamii, C. gulbenkiani and C. kibatiensis. Our results also show that subgenus Remmia is monophyletic. Relationships of species of the Milnei group were well-supported and demonstrate the monophyly of this group. Borkent’s classification for Similis group is confirmed. In addition, C. neavei and C. ovalis (Neavei group) are placed in the subgenus Synhelea. (Resume d’auteur)

Yiaumin Huang – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

Harry Smit – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • The water mite family Mideopsidae (Acari: Hydrachnidia): a contribution to the diversity in the Afrotropical Region and taxonomic changes above species level.
    Zootaxa, 2013
    Co-Authors: Vladimir Pešić, David Cook, Reinhard Gerecke, Harry Smit
    Abstract:

    A rearrangement of genera and subgenera in the water mite family Mideopsidae is proposed, resulting in the following changes: Mideopsellinae Lundblad, 1937 and Phreatomideopsinae Schwoerbel, 1986 are synonymized with Mideopsidae Koenike, 1910; Djeboa K. Viets, 1911, Mideopsides Lundblad, 1943, Neoxystonotus Lundblad, 1927,  Octomideopsis K. Viets, 1931 and Xystonotus Wolcott, 1900 are redefined and proposed as distinct genera. A global key for the genera of the family is given. New records of water mites of the genus Djeboa K. Viets, 1911, Xystonotus Wolcott, 1900 and Mideopsellides K.O.Viets, 1962 (Acari: Hydrachnidia, Mideopsidae) from the Afrotropical Region are presented. Twenty species new to science are described, i.e., Djeboa amendano (Madagascar), D. amethystica (Madagascar), D. angulipalpis (Madagascar), D. coelestinica (Madagascar), D. crocodilorum (South Africa), D. curtipalpis (Ghana), Djeboa depressa (Cote d’Ivoire), D. dinosaurophila (South Africa), D. elephantina (Cote d’Ivoire), D. ghanaensis (Ghana), D. gledhilli (Cote d’Ivoire, Ghana), D. globulipalpis (South Africa, Ghana), D. granatica (Madagascar), D. mandena (Madagascar), D. maromandia (Madagascar), D. nzia (Cote d’Ivoire), D. turmalinica (Madagascar), D. vanilla (Madagascar), D. wondergemi (Ghana) and Xystonotus madagascariensis (Madagascar); a first description of the male is given for Djeboa bimaculata (Cook, 1966). A key for all species of the Djeboa is presented.

  • First record of the water mite genus Momonides Lundblad from the Afrotropical Region (Acari: Hydrachnidia: Momoniidae)
    Systematic and Applied Acarology, 2012
    Co-Authors: Harry Smit
    Abstract:

    Abstract A new species of the genus Momonides Lundblad, 1941 is described from Ghana. This is the first record of the genus from the Afrotropical Region.

  • New records of the water mite family Arrenuridae from the Afrotropical Region, with the description of 11 new species and two new subspecies (Acari: Hydrachnidia)
    Zootaxa, 2012
    Co-Authors: Harry Smit
    Abstract:

    Ten new species and two new subssubspecies of the water mite genus Arrenurus are described from the Afrotropical Region,i.e. Arrenurus abyssinicus n. sp., A. altomontanus n. sp., A. baleensis n. sp., A. bechuanicus n. sp., A. botswanicus n. sp., A. coronopetiolatus n. sp., A. flavus n. sp., A. monocavus n. sp., A. okavango n. sp. and A. serratipetiolatus n. sp., A. chutteri longipes n. subsp., A. concavus longifissus n. subsp. One new species of the genus Thoracophoracarus is de-scribed, T. fluviatilis n. sp. The following taxa are proposed to the rank of a full species: A. chutteri K.O. Viets, A. damasi Lundblad and A. grandis Walter & Bader. Arrenurus odonatophilus Muchberg is transferred to the subgenus Brevicau- daturus Smit, while A. discretus Cook is synonymized with the latter species. Arrenurus vanopus Cook is synonymizedwith A. capensis Thor, and the female of A. petri Cook must be assigned to A. capensis. The presumed female of A. petri is described therefore again. The male of A. latifoliatus K. Viets is redescribed and the female of this species is described for the first time.

Charles R. Haddad – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Revision and molecular phylogeny of the spider genus Micaria Westring, 1851 (Araneae: Gnaphosidae) in the Afrotropical Region
    Zootaxa, 2021
    Co-Authors: Ruan Booysen, Charles R. Haddad
    Abstract:

    The genus Micaria Westring, 1851 (Araneae, Gnaphosidae) is a group of small (1.85-5 mm) ant-like spiders that can be distinguished from other gnaphosids by their piriform gland spigots that are similar in size to the major ampullate gland spigots. According to the World Spider Catalog, there are 105 species of Micaria in the world, of which only three species are known from the African part of the Afrotropical Region, namely M. chrysis (Simon, 1910), M. tersissima Simon, 1910 and M. beaufortia (Tucker, 1923). The objectives of this study were to revise Micaria in the Afrotropical Region, providing new and updated records for each of the species, evaluating the relationships between them using COI barcoding data, and providing information on their biology, mimetic relationships and feeding ecology. These objectives were met by collecting fresh material from the KwaZulu-Natal, Western Cape, Northern Cape and Free State provinces in South Africa. Fresh material of M. tersissima and M. chrysis were collected from their type localities, Komaggas and Port Nolloth (Northern Cape Province), respectively, for identification and DNA analyses. COI sequences generated, together with those sourced from Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) and GenBank, were aligned using the CulstalW alignment algorithm in the Mega X software, and molecular phylogenetic analyses were performed using MrBayes for Bayesian Inference (BI) and RaxML for maximum likelihood (ML) analyses. Morphological examination of the collected and voucher material yielded 17 new species for the Afrotropical Region, namely M. basaliducta sp. nov. (♀, ♂, South Africa), M. bimaculata sp. nov. (♀, ♂, Mauritania), M. bispicula sp. nov. (♀, ♂, Namibia, South Africa), M. durbana sp. nov. (♀, ♂, South Africa, Zambia), M. felix sp. nov. (♀, ♂, Cameroon, Ethiopia, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, Zambia, Zimbabwe), M. gagnoa sp. nov. (♀, ♂, Côte d’Ivoire, Mozambique, Mozambique, Tanzania), M. koingnaas sp. nov. (♂, South Africa), M. lata sp. nov. (♂, Namibia, South Africa), M. laxa sp. nov. (♀, South Africa), M. mediospina sp. nov. (♂, South Africa), M. parvotibialis sp. nov. (♀, ♂, Senegal), M. plana sp. nov. (♀, ♂, Ethiopia), M. quadrata sp. nov. (♀, Ethiopia), M. quinquemaculosa sp. nov. (♀, ♂, Namibia, South Africa), M. rivonosy sp. nov. (♀, ♂, Madagascar), M. sanipass sp. nov. (♂, South Africa) and M. scutellata sp. nov. (♂, South Africa). Furthermore, both sexes of M. beaufortia, as well as the male of M. tersissima, are redescribed. Both sexes of M. chrysis are described for the first time, as this species was only known from a juvenile. Of the previously known species, M. beaufortia (Botswana, Ethiopia, Lesotho, Namibia, South Africa, Zimbabwe) and M. chrysis (Côte d’Ivoire, Ethiopia, Lesotho, Namibia, South Africa, Tanzania) are widespread in the Afroptropics, while M. tersissima is only known from South Africa. Both the Bayesian inference and the maximum likelihood analysess recovered Micaria (sensu lato) as monophyletic with the inclusion of the subopaca group. The pulicaria species group was recovered as polyphyletic in both the BI and ML analyses. Four Afrotropical species, as well as the M. rossica Thorell, 1875/M. foxi Gertsch, 1933 group, formed a clade sister to M. formicaria (Sundevall, 1831). Eight of the Afrotropical species now have COI barcoding data uploaded to BOLD.

  • Remarks on two poorly known Dionycha spiders from the Afrotropical Region (Araneae: Cheiracanthiidae, Liocranidae)
    Arachnology, 2020
    Co-Authors: Zingisile Mbo, Charles R. Haddad
    Abstract:

    Embrik Strand described a large number of spiders from the Afrotropical Region. We examined the type specimens of two poorly known species from the Museum fur Naturkunde, Berlin, which have never been redescribed or illustrated. Clubiona ruandana Strand, 1916 (Clubionidae) is misplaced and its transfer to CheiracanthiumWagner, 1887 (Cheiracanthiidae) is proposed, based on a redescription of the female holotype, making it the sixth Cheiracanthium species recorded from Rwanda. The female holotype of Corinna nossibeensisStrand, 1907 (Corinnidae) is imaged and the species is synonymized with Oedignatha scrobiculataThorell, 1881 (Liocranidae), representing the first record of this genus and species from Madagascar.

  • A revision of the continental species of Copa Simon, 1885 (Araneae, Corinnidae) in the Afrotropical Region.
    ZooKeys, 2013
    Co-Authors: Charles R. Haddad
    Abstract:

    The cryptic ground-dwelling castianeirine genus Copa Simon, 1885 (Araneae: Corinnidae) is revised in the continental Afrotropical Region. The type species of the genus, Copa flavoplumosa Simon, 1885, is redescribed and considered a senior synonym of Copa benina Strand, 1916 syn. n. and Copa benina nigra Lessert, 1933 syn. n. It is widespread throughout the Afrotropical Region but has not been introduced to any of the associated Regional islands. A new species, Copa kei sp. n., is described from South Africa. Copa agelenina Simon, 1910, originally described from a subadult female from southern Botswana, is considered a nomen dubium. Copa flavoplumosa is a characteristic species of leaf litter spider assemblages and is particularly prevalent in savanna habitats on the continent, but also occurs in various forest types, grasslands, fynbos and semi-arid Nama Karoo habitats. In contrast, Copa kei sp. n. has only been recorded from Afromontane and coastal forests in south-eastern South Africa.

Leopoldo M Rueda – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.