Aftercooler - Explore the Science & Experts | ideXlab

Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

Aftercooler

The Experts below are selected from a list of 372 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Evangelos G. Giakoumis – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • 2004b) Parametric Study of Transient Turbocharged Diesel Engine Operation from the Second-Law Perspective
    , 2015
    Co-Authors: Constantine D. Rakopoulos, Evangelos G. Giakoumis

    Abstract:

    Copyright © 2004 SAE International A computer analysis is developed for studying the energy and exergy performance of a turbocharged diesel engine, operating under transient load conditions. The model incorporates some novel features for the simulation of transient operation, such as detailed analysis of mechanical friction, separate consideration for the processes of each cylinder during a cycle (“multi-cylinder ” model) and mathematical modelling of the fuel pump. The model is validated against experimental data taken from a turbocharged diesel engine, located at the authors ’ laboratory, operated under transient load conditions. The availability terms for the diesel engine and its subsystems are analyzed, i.e. cylinder for both the open and closed parts of the cycle, inlet and exhaust manifolds, turbocharger and Aftercooler. The effect of various dynamic, thermodynamic and design parameters on the second-law transient performance of the engine, manifolds and turbocharger is investigated, i.e. magnitude of applied load, type of connected loading, turbocharger mass moment of inertia, exhaust manifold volume, cylinder wall temperature and Aftercooler effectiveness. Explicit diagrams are given to show how, after a ramp increase in load, each parameter examined affects the second-law properties of all subsystems such as cylinder, heat loss to the walls and exhaust gas availability as well as combustion, exhaust manifold and turbocharger irreversibilities. It is revealed from the analysis that the in-cylinder (mainly combustion) irreversibilities outweigh all other similar terms for every transient event but with decreasing magnitude when load increases, with the exhaust manifold processes being the second biggest irreversibilities producer with increasing magnitude when load increases. Design parameters such as cylinder wall insulation or Aftercooler effectiveness can have a notable effect on the second-law properties of the engine, despite the fact that their effect on the (thermo)dynamic response is minimal

  • Irreversibility production during transient operation of a turbocharged diesel engine
    International Journal of Vehicle Design, 2007
    Co-Authors: Evangelos G. Giakoumis, Eleftherios C. Andritsakis

    Abstract:

    A computer model has been developed for studying the first- and second-law balances of a turbocharged diesel engine under transient conditions. Special attention is paid to the identification and quantification of the irreversibilities of all processes and devices after a ramp increase in load. The model includes a detailed analysis of mechanical friction, a separate consideration for the processes in each cylinder during a cycle (‘multi-cylinder’ model) and a mathematical simulation of the fuel pump. Experimental data taken from a turbocharged diesel engine are used for the evaluation of the model’s predictive capabilities. The contribution of combustion, manifolds, Aftercooler and turbocharger irreversibility production is analysed using detailed diagrams. It is revealed that transient in-cylinder irreversibilities develop in a different manner compared to the respective steady-state. Combustion has always a dominant contribution but the exhaust manifold irreversibilities cannot be ignored, whereas those attributed to the inlet manifold, turbocharger and Aftercooler are always of lesser importance.

  • Second-law analyses applied to internal combustion engines operation
    Progress in Energy and Combustion Science, 2006
    Co-Authors: Constantine D. Rakopoulos, Evangelos G. Giakoumis

    Abstract:

    This paper surveys the publications available in the literature concerning the application of the second-law of thermodynamics to internal combustion engines. The availability (exergy) balance equations of the engine cylinder and subsystems are reviewed in detail providing also relations concerning the definition of state properties, chemical availability, flow and fuel availability, and dead state. Special attention is given to identification and quantification of second-law efficiencies and the irreversibilities of various processes and subsystems. The latter being particularly important since they are not identified in traditional first-law analysis. In identifying these processes and subsystems, the main differences between second- and first-law analyses are also highlighted. A detailed reference is made to the findings of various researchers in the field over the last 40 years concerning all types of internal combustion engines, i.e. spark ignition, compression ignition (direct or indirect injection), turbocharged or naturally aspirated, during steady-state and transient operation. All of the subsystems (compressor, Aftercooler, inlet manifold, cylinder, exhaust manifold, turbine), are also covered. Explicit comparative diagrams, as well as tabulation of typical energy and exergy balances, are presented. The survey extends to the various parametric studies conducted, including among other aspects the very interesting cases of low heat rejection engines, the use of alternative fuels and transient operation. Thus, the main differences between the results of second- and first-law analyses are highlighted and discussed.

Constantine D. Rakopoulos – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • 2004b) Parametric Study of Transient Turbocharged Diesel Engine Operation from the Second-Law Perspective
    , 2015
    Co-Authors: Constantine D. Rakopoulos, Evangelos G. Giakoumis

    Abstract:

    Copyright © 2004 SAE International A computer analysis is developed for studying the energy and exergy performance of a turbocharged diesel engine, operating under transient load conditions. The model incorporates some novel features for the simulation of transient operation, such as detailed analysis of mechanical friction, separate consideration for the processes of each cylinder during a cycle (“multi-cylinder ” model) and mathematical modelling of the fuel pump. The model is validated against experimental data taken from a turbocharged diesel engine, located at the authors ’ laboratory, operated under transient load conditions. The availability terms for the diesel engine and its subsystems are analyzed, i.e. cylinder for both the open and closed parts of the cycle, inlet and exhaust manifolds, turbocharger and Aftercooler. The effect of various dynamic, thermodynamic and design parameters on the second-law transient performance of the engine, manifolds and turbocharger is investigated, i.e. magnitude of applied load, type of connected loading, turbocharger mass moment of inertia, exhaust manifold volume, cylinder wall temperature and Aftercooler effectiveness. Explicit diagrams are given to show how, after a ramp increase in load, each parameter examined affects the second-law properties of all subsystems such as cylinder, heat loss to the walls and exhaust gas availability as well as combustion, exhaust manifold and turbocharger irreversibilities. It is revealed from the analysis that the in-cylinder (mainly combustion) irreversibilities outweigh all other similar terms for every transient event but with decreasing magnitude when load increases, with the exhaust manifold processes being the second biggest irreversibilities producer with increasing magnitude when load increases. Design parameters such as cylinder wall insulation or Aftercooler effectiveness can have a notable effect on the second-law properties of the engine, despite the fact that their effect on the (thermo)dynamic response is minimal

  • Second-law analyses applied to internal combustion engines operation
    Progress in Energy and Combustion Science, 2006
    Co-Authors: Constantine D. Rakopoulos, Evangelos G. Giakoumis

    Abstract:

    This paper surveys the publications available in the literature concerning the application of the second-law of thermodynamics to internal combustion engines. The availability (exergy) balance equations of the engine cylinder and subsystems are reviewed in detail providing also relations concerning the definition of state properties, chemical availability, flow and fuel availability, and dead state. Special attention is given to identification and quantification of second-law efficiencies and the irreversibilities of various processes and subsystems. The latter being particularly important since they are not identified in traditional first-law analysis. In identifying these processes and subsystems, the main differences between second- and first-law analyses are also highlighted. A detailed reference is made to the findings of various researchers in the field over the last 40 years concerning all types of internal combustion engines, i.e. spark ignition, compression ignition (direct or indirect injection), turbocharged or naturally aspirated, during steady-state and transient operation. All of the subsystems (compressor, Aftercooler, inlet manifold, cylinder, exhaust manifold, turbine), are also covered. Explicit comparative diagrams, as well as tabulation of typical energy and exergy balances, are presented. The survey extends to the various parametric studies conducted, including among other aspects the very interesting cases of low heat rejection engines, the use of alternative fuels and transient operation. Thus, the main differences between the results of second- and first-law analyses are highlighted and discussed.

  • operation
    , 2005
    Co-Authors: Constantine D. Rakopoulos, Evangelos G. Giakoumis

    Abstract:

    This paper surveys the publications available in the literature concerning the application of the second-law of thermodynamics to internal combustion engines. The availability (exergy) balance equations of the engine cylinder and subsystems are reviewed in detail providing also relations concerning the definition of state properties, chemical availability, flow and fuel availability, and dead state. Special attention is given to identification and quantification of second-law efficiencies and the irreversibilities of various processes and subsystems. The latter being particularly important since they are not identified in traditional first-law analysis. In identifying these processes and subsystems, the main differences between second- and first-law analyses are also highlighted. A detailed reference is made to the findings of various researchers in the field over the last 40 years concerning all types of internal combustion engines, i.e. spark ignition, compression ignition (direct or indirect injection), turbocharged or naturally aspirated, during steady-state and transient operation. All of the subsystems (compressor, Aftercooler, inlet manifold, cylinder, exhaust manifold, turbine), are also covered. Explicit comparative diagrams, as well as tabulation of typical energy and exergy balances, are presented. The survey extends to the various parametric studies conducted, including among other aspects the very interesting cases of low heat rejection engines, the use of alternative fuels and transient operation. Thus, the main difference

Gianfranco Rizzo – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Potentialities of CAES (Compressed Air Energy Storage) and V2G (Vehicle to Grid) in the Electricity Market Optimization and in the Integration of Renewable Resources
    , 2009
    Co-Authors: Ivan Arsie, Vincenzo Marano, Michael Moran, Gianfranco Rizzo

    Abstract:

    The paper deals with the simulation and optimization of a Hybrid Power Plant (HPP) consisting of a wind turbine coupled with Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES). According with the proposed

    plant lay-out, the wind power surplus is used to drive a multi-stage compressor to store compressed air in an air reservoir, while, in case of power demand, the compressed air is heated in multiple expansion stages using the stored heat and conventional thermal sources.

    Hybrid power plants can offer significant benefits in terms of flexibility in matching a fluctuating power demand, particularly when renewable sources, characterized by high and often unpredictable variability, are utilized. The possible advantages in terms of energy and cost savings with respect to other solutions must be carefully assessed, critically depending on performance and efficiencies of each sub-system, most of them operating in transient and off-design conditions.

    To this purpose, a thermodynamic model composed of several sub-systems describing wind turbine, multi-stage compressor, intercooler, Aftercooler, heat recovery system, compressed air storage and turbine has been developed in Matlab/Simulink®. Operational and investment costs have been estimated, aiming to compare several plant scenarios with respect to the main control and design variables, evidencing economic and energetic performance and environmental impact

  • A MODEL OF A HYBRID POWER PLANT WITH WIND TURBINES AND COMPRESSED AIR ENERGY STORAGE
    ASME 2005 Power Conference, 2005
    Co-Authors: Ivan Arsie, Vincenzo Marano, G. Nappi, Gianfranco Rizzo

    Abstract:

    After a general overview of Hybrid Power Plants (HPP) and Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES), the authors present a thermo-economic model for the simulation and optimization of a HPP consisting of a wind turbine coupled with CAES. In the proposed scheme, during periods of excess power production, atmospheric air is compressed in a multistage compressor and cooled; when there is power demand, the compressed air is heated in multiple expansion stages using the stored heat and conventional thermal sources. Such plants can offer significant benefits in terms of flexibility in matching a fluctuating power demand, particularly when renewable sources, characterized by high and often unpredictable variability, are utilized. The possible advantages in terms of energy and cost savings with respect to other solutions must be carefully assessed, critically depending on performance and efficiencies of each sub-system, most of them operating in transient and off-design conditions. To this purpose, a thermodynamic model composed of several sub-systems describing wind turbine, multi-stage compressor, intercooler, Aftercooler, heat recovery system, compressed air storage and turbine has been developed in Matlab/Simulink® environment. In the paper, several scenarios are compared by simulation and optimization analysis and a parametric study of the plant performance with respect to the main design variables is presented.

  • Thermo-economical analysis of a wind power plant with compressed air energy storage
    , 2005
    Co-Authors: Ivan Arsie, Vincenzo Marano, Gianfranco Rizzo

    Abstract:

    The paper deals with the simulation and optimization of a Hybrid Power Plant (HPP) consisting of a wind turbine coupled with Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES). According with the proposed plant lay-out, the wind power surplus is used to drive a multi-stage compressor to store compressed air in an air reservoir, while, in case of power demand, the compressed air is heated in multiple expansion stages using the stored heat and conventional thermal sources.

    Hybrid power plants can offer significant benefits in terms of flexibility in matching a fluctuating power demand, particularly when renewable sources, characterized by high and often unpredictable variability, are utilized. The possible advantages in terms of energy and cost savings with respect to other solutions must be carefully assessed, critically depending on performance and efficiencies of each sub-system, most of them operating in transient and off-design conditions.

    To this purpose, a thermodynamic model composed of several sub-systems describing wind turbine, multi-stage compressor, intercooler, Aftercooler, heat recovery system, compressed air storage and turbine has been developed in Matlab/Simulink®. Operational and investment costs have been estimated, aiming to compare several plant scenarios with respect to the main control and design variables, evidencing economic and energetic performance and environmental impact