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Agaricomycetes

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Terry W. Henkel – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Kombocles bakaiana gen. sp. nov. (Boletaceae), a new sequestrate fungus from Cameroon
    IMA Fungus, 2016
    Co-Authors: Michael A. Castellano, Todd F. Elliott, Camille Truong, Olivier Séné, Bryn T. M. Dentinger, Terry W. Henkel

    Abstract:

    Kombocles bakaiana gen. sp. nov. is described as new to science. This sequestrate, partially hypogeous fungus was collected around and within the stilt root system of an ectomycorrhizal (ECM) tree of the genus Uapaca (Phyllanthaceae) in a Guineo-Congolian mixed tropical rainforest in Cameroon. Molecular data place this fungus in Boletaceae (Boletales, Agaricomycetes, Basidiomycota) with no clear relationship to previously described taxa within the family. Macro- and micromorphological characters, habitat, and DNA sequence data are provided. Unique morphological features and a molecular phylogenetic analysis of 304 sequences across the Boletales justify the recognition of the new taxa. Kombocles bakaiana is the fourth sequestrate Boletaceae described from the greater African tropics, and the first to be described from Cameroon.

  • New sequestrate fungi from Guyana: Jimtrappea guyanensis gen. sp. nov., Castellanea pakaraimophila gen. sp. nov., and Costatisporus cyanescens gen. sp. nov. (Boletaceae, Boletales)
    IMA Fungus, 2015
    Co-Authors: Matthew E. Smith, Todd F. Elliott, Kevin R. Amses, Keisuke Obase, M. Catherine Aime, Terry W. Henkel

    Abstract:

    Jimtrappea guyanensis gen. sp. nov., Castellanea pakaraimophila gen. sp. nov., and Costatisporus cyanescens gen. sp. nov. are described as new to science. These sequestrate, hypogeous fungi were collected in Guyana under closed canopy tropical forests in association with ectomycorrhizal (ECM) host tree genera Dicymbe (Fabaceae subfam. Caesalpinioideae), Aldina (Fabaceae subfam. Papilionoideae) , and Pakaraimaea (Dipterocarpaceae). Molecular data place these fungi in Boletaceae (Boletales, Agaricomycetes, Basidiomycota) and inform their relationships to other known epigeous and sequestrate taxa within that family. Macro- and micromorphological characters, habitat, and multi-locus DNA sequence data are provided for each new taxon. Unique morphological features and a molecular phylogenetic analysis of 185 taxa across the order Boletales justify the recognition of the three new genera.

Alexander R. Schmidt – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Pre-Cretaceous Agaricomycetes yet to be discovered: Reinvestigation of a putative Triassic bracket fungus from southern Germany
    Fossil Record, 2012
    Co-Authors: Anna Philie Kiecksee, Leyla J. Seyfullah, Heinrich Dörfelt, Jochen Heinrichs, Herbert Süß, Alexander R. Schmidt

    Abstract:

    Agaricomycetes are major components of extant terrestrial ecosystems; however, their fruiting bodies are exceedingly rare as fossils. Reinvestigation of a peculiar fossil from Late Triassic sediments of southern Germany interpreted as a bracket fungus revealed that this fossil in fact represents a wood abnormality, resulting from injury to the cambium and subsequent callus growth in a Baieroxylon-like ginkgoalean wood. As a result, the fossil record of the Agaricomycetes does not yet pre-date the Early Cretaceous, suggesting a late diversification of basidiomycetes possessing large fruiting bodies.

  • Pre-Cretaceous Agaricomycetes yet to be discovered: Reinvestigation of a putative Triassic bracket fungus from southern Germany
    Fossil Record, 2012
    Co-Authors: Anna Philie Kiecksee, Leyla J. Seyfullah, Heinrich Dörfelt, Jochen Heinrichs, Herbert Süß, Alexander R. Schmidt

    Abstract:

    Agaricomycetes are major components of extant terrestrial ecosystems; however, their fruiting bodies are exceedingly rare as fossils. Reinvestigation of a peculiar fossil from Late Triassic sediments of southern Germany interpreted as a bracket fungus revealed that this fossil in fact represents a wood abnormality, resulting from injury to the cambium and subsequent callus growth in a <i>Baieroxylon</i> -like ginkgoalean wood. As a result, the fossil record of the Agaricomycetes does not yet pre-date the Early Cretaceous, suggesting a late diversification of basidiomycetes possessing large fruiting bodies. <br><br> doi:<a href=”http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/mmng.201200006″ target=”_blank”>10.1002/mmng.201200006</a>

Teruyuki Matsumoto – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • karyological characterization of meiosis post meiotic mitosis and nuclear migration in the ectomycorrhizal fungus rhizopogon roseolus r rubescens
    Mycologia, 2012
    Co-Authors: Norihiro Shimomura, Kiyomi Sawada, Tadanori Aimi, Nitaro Maekawa, Teruyuki Matsumoto

    Abstract:

    Karyological characteristics during basidiosporogenesis of Rhizopogon roseolus, a member of the hypogeous Agaricomycetes, were studied by light and transmission electron microscopy. More than 1000 tissue fragments of young basidiomata were stained with HCl-Giemsa and observed by a light microscopy to evaluate nuclear behavior. Basidium morphology in the hymenium was observed by transmission electron microscopy. Meiosis and post-meiotic mitosis took place in the center of the basidium. Sterigmata appeared when the first meiotic division occurred, and the center of the basidium became constricted when the second meiotic division occurred. Asynchronous nuclear migration from the basidium into the basidiospores occurred after post-meiotic mitosis, producing eight uninucleate basidiospores. The nucleus migrated patchily into basidiospores. The pattern of post-meiotic mitosis of R. roseolus, in which post-meiotic mitosis took place in the center of the basidium, is reported for the first time.

  • Karyological characterization of meiosis, post-meiotic mitosis and nuclear migration in the ectomycorrhizal fungus Rhizopogon roseolus (= R. rubescens)
    Mycologia, 2012
    Co-Authors: Norihiro Shimomura, Kiyomi Sawada, Tadanori Aimi, Nitaro Maekawa, Teruyuki Matsumoto

    Abstract:

    Karyological characteristics during basidiosporogenesis of Rhizopogon roseolus, a member of the hypogeous Agaricomycetes, were studied by light and transmission electron microscopy. More than 1000 tissue fragments of young basidiomata were stained with HCl-Giemsa and observed by a light microscopy to evaluate nuclear behavior. Basidium morphology in the hymenium was observed by transmission electron microscopy. Meiosis and post-meiotic mitosis took place in the center of the basidium. Sterigmata appeared when the first meiotic division occurred, and the center of the basidium became constricted when the second meiotic division occurred. Asynchronous nuclear migration from the basidium into the basidiospores occurred after post-meiotic mitosis, producing eight uninucleate basidiospores. The nucleus migrated patchily into basidiospores. The pattern of post-meiotic mitosis of R. roseolus, in which post-meiotic mitosis took place in the center of the basidium, is reported for the first time.

  • short title rhizopogon roseolus karyological characterization of meiosis post meiotic mitosis and nuclear migration in the ectomycorrhizal fungus rhizopogon roseolus r rubescens
    , 2012
    Co-Authors: Norihiro Shimomura, Kiyomi Sawada, Tadanori Aimi, Nitaro Maekawa, Teruyuki Matsumoto

    Abstract:

    Karyological characteristics during basidiosporogenesis of Rhizopogon roseolus, a member of the hypogeous Agaricomycetes, were studied by light and transmission electron microscopy. More than 1000 tissue fragments of young basidiomata were stained with HCl-Giemsa and observed by a light microscopy to evaluate nuclear behavior. Basidium morphology in the hymenium was observed by transmission electron microscopy. Meiosis and post-meiotic mitosis took place in the center of the basidium. Sterigmata appeared when the first meiotic division occurred, and the center of the basidium became constricted when the second meiotic division occurred. Asynchronous nuclear migration from the basidium into the basidiospores occurred after post-meiotic mitosis, producing eight uninucleate basidiospores. The nucleus migrated patchily into basidiospores. The pattern of post-meiotic mitosis of R. roseolus, in which post-meiotic mitosis took place in the center of the basidium, is reported for the first time.