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Agave

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Axel Visel – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • de novo transcriptome assembly of drought tolerant cam plants Agave deserti and Agave tequilana
    BMC Genomics, 2013
    Co-Authors: Stephen Gross, Axel Visel, Jeffrey Martin, June Simpson, Maria Jazmin Abrahamjuarez, Zhong Wang

    Abstract:

    Background
    Agaves are succulent monocotyledonous plants native to xeric environments of North America. Because of their adaptations to their environment, including crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM, a water-efficient form of photosynthesis), and existing technologies for ethanol production, Agaves have gained attention both as potential lignocellulosic bioenergy feedstocks and models for exploring plant responses to abiotic stress. However, the lack of comprehensive Agave sequence datasets limits the scope of investigations into the molecular-genetic basis of Agave traits.

  • De novo transcriptome assembly of drought tolerant CAM plants, Agave deserti and Agave tequilana.
    BMC Genomics, 2013
    Co-Authors: Stephen Gross, Jeffrey Martin, June Simpson, Zhong Wang, María Jazmín Abraham-juárez, Axel Visel

    Abstract:

    Background: Agaves are succulent monocotyledonous plants native to xeric environments of North America. Because of their adaptations to their environment, including crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM, a water-efficient form of photosynthesis), and existing technologies for ethanol production, Agaves have gained attention both as potential lignocellulosic bioenergy feedstocks and models for exploring plant responses to abiotic stress. However, the lack of comprehensive Agave sequence datasets limits the scope of investigations into the molecular-genetic basis of Agave traits. Results: Here, we present comprehensive, high quality de novo transcriptome assemblies of two Agave species, A. tequilana and A. deserti, built from short-read RNA-seq data. Our analyses support completeness and accuracy of the de novo transcriptome assemblies, with each species having a minimum of approximately 35,000 protein-coding genes. Comparison of Agave proteomes to those of additional plant species identifies biological functions of gene families displaying sequence divergence in Agave species. Additionally, a focus on the transcriptomics of the A. deserti juvenile leaf confirms evolutionary conservation of monocotyledonous leaf physiology and development along the proximal-distal axis. Conclusions: Our work presents a comprehensive transcriptome resource for two Agave species and provides insight into their biology and physiology. These resources are a foundation for further investigation of Agave biology and their improvement for bioenergy development.

  • Transcriptome Analysis of Drought-Tolerant CAM plants Agave deserti and Agave tequilana
    , 2013
    Co-Authors: Stephen Gross, Jeffrey Martin, June Simpson, Zhong Wang, Axel Visel

    Abstract:

    Agaves are succulent monocotyledonous plants native to hot and arid environments of North America. Because of their adaptations to their environment, including crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM, a water-efficient form of photosynthesis) and existing technologies for ethanol production, Agaves have gained attention both as potential lignocellulosic bioenergy feedstocks and models for exploring plant responses to abiotic stress. However, the lack of comprehensive Agave sequence datasets limits the scope of investigations into the molecular-genetic basis of Agave traits. Here, we present comprehensive, high quality de novo transcriptome assemblies of two Agave species, A. tequilana and A. deserti, from short-read RNA-seq data. Our analyses support completeness and accuracy of the de novo transcriptome assemblies, with each species having approximately 35,000 protein-coding genes. Comparison of Agave proteomes to those of additional plant species identifies biological functions of gene families displaying sequence divergence in Agave species. Additionally, we use RNA-seq data to gain insights into biological functions along the A. deserti juvenile leaf proximal-distal axis. Our work presents a foundation for further investigation of Agave biology and their improvement for bioenergy development.

Stephen Gross – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • plant compartment and biogeography affect microbiome composition in cultivated and native Agave species
    New Phytologist, 2016
    Co-Authors: Stephen Gross, Scott Clingenpeel, Devin Colemanderr, Damaris Desgarennes, Citlali Fonsecagarcia, Tanja Woyke

    Abstract:

    Desert plants are hypothesized to survive the environmental stress inherent to these regions in part thanks to symbioses with microorganisms, and yet these microbial species, the communities they form, and the forces that influence them are poorly understood. Here we report the first comprehensive investigation of the microbial communities associated with species of Agave, which are native to semiarid and arid regions of Central and North America and are emerging as biofuel feedstocks. We examined prokaryotic and fungal communities in the rhizosphere, phyllosphere, leaf and root endosphere, as well as proximal and distal soil samples from cultivated and native Agaves, through Illumina amplicon sequencing. Phylogenetic profiling revealed that the composition of prokaryotic communities was primarily determined by the plant compartment, whereas the composition of fungal communities was mainly influenced by the biogeography of the host species. Cultivated A. tequilana exhibited lower levels of prokaryotic diversity compared with native Agaves, although no differences in microbial diversity were found in the endosphere. Agaves shared core prokaryotic and fungal taxa known to promote plant growth and confer tolerance to abiotic stress, which suggests common principles underpinning Agave-microbe interactions.

  • de novo transcriptome assembly of drought tolerant cam plants Agave deserti and Agave tequilana
    BMC Genomics, 2013
    Co-Authors: Stephen Gross, Axel Visel, Jeffrey Martin, June Simpson, Maria Jazmin Abrahamjuarez, Zhong Wang

    Abstract:

    Background
    Agaves are succulent monocotyledonous plants native to xeric environments of North America. Because of their adaptations to their environment, including crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM, a water-efficient form of photosynthesis), and existing technologies for ethanol production, Agaves have gained attention both as potential lignocellulosic bioenergy feedstocks and models for exploring plant responses to abiotic stress. However, the lack of comprehensive Agave sequence datasets limits the scope of investigations into the molecular-genetic basis of Agave traits.

  • De novo transcriptome assembly of drought tolerant CAM plants, Agave deserti and Agave tequilana.
    BMC Genomics, 2013
    Co-Authors: Stephen Gross, Jeffrey Martin, June Simpson, Zhong Wang, María Jazmín Abraham-juárez, Axel Visel

    Abstract:

    Background: Agaves are succulent monocotyledonous plants native to xeric environments of North America. Because of their adaptations to their environment, including crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM, a water-efficient form of photosynthesis), and existing technologies for ethanol production, Agaves have gained attention both as potential lignocellulosic bioenergy feedstocks and models for exploring plant responses to abiotic stress. However, the lack of comprehensive Agave sequence datasets limits the scope of investigations into the molecular-genetic basis of Agave traits. Results: Here, we present comprehensive, high quality de novo transcriptome assemblies of two Agave species, A. tequilana and A. deserti, built from short-read RNA-seq data. Our analyses support completeness and accuracy of the de novo transcriptome assemblies, with each species having a minimum of approximately 35,000 protein-coding genes. Comparison of Agave proteomes to those of additional plant species identifies biological functions of gene families displaying sequence divergence in Agave species. Additionally, a focus on the transcriptomics of the A. deserti juvenile leaf confirms evolutionary conservation of monocotyledonous leaf physiology and development along the proximal-distal axis. Conclusions: Our work presents a comprehensive transcriptome resource for two Agave species and provides insight into their biology and physiology. These resources are a foundation for further investigation of Agave biology and their improvement for bioenergy development.

Judith Esmeralda Uriassilvas – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • thermal properties of Agave fructans Agave tequilana weber var azul
    Carbohydrate Polymers, 2012
    Co-Authors: Hugo Espinosaandrews, Judith Esmeralda Uriassilvas

    Abstract:

    Abstract Thermal properties of Agave ( A. tequilana Weber var. Azul) at different water contents were investigated. HP-TLC results showed a complex mixture of mono-, di-, oligo, and polysaccharides in Agave fructans samples. The thermal decomposition temperatures were observed below to 200 °C. Modulated-differential scanning calorimetry studies showed a glass transition and a relaxation enthalpy processes in Agave fructans. Samples with the highest moieties of monosaccharides showed the lower glass transition temperatures ( Tg ). The moisture sorption isotherm of Agave fructans was determined at 20 °C and fitted to the GAB model. Gordon–Taylor equation was used to fit the Tg experimental data as a function of water content. Agave fructans was found to be an amorphous material. At low water activity ( a w ) values ( a w (0.4–0.75) collapsed and caked; and at high a w (>0.75) changed in a highly viscous liquid-like solution.