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Age Diversity

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Stephan A Boehm – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • It Matters How Old We Feel in Organizations : Testing a Multilevel Model of Organizational Subjective‐Age Diversity on Employee Outcomes
    Journal of Organizational Behavior, 2021
    Co-Authors: Florian Kunze, Stephan A Boehm, Heike Bruch
    Abstract:

    This study contributes to the emerging literature on Age Diversity effects at the organizational level of analysis by comparing the role of chronological-Age Diversity versus subjective-Age Diversity. We hypothesize a multilevel model in which organizationallevel subjective-Age Diversity is negatively related to bonding social capital within organizations, which, in turn, contributes to heightened employee engAgement and lowered turnover intentions. The assumed relationships are tested in a multilevel sample of 96 German small- and medium-sized companies with 16,274 employees participating. We gathered data from four different sources to circumvent common source problems and received support for most of the proposed relationships. Given the potentially detrimental effects of high subjective-Age Diversity in the workplace, the paper concludes with practical recommendations on how to manAge subjectiveAge Diversity in companies proactively.

  • How Do I-Deals Influence Client Satisfaction? The Role of Exhaustion, Collective Commitment, and Age Diversity
    Journal of Management, 2017
    Co-Authors: P. Matthijs Bal, Stephan A Boehm
    Abstract:

    This paper introduces a multilevel perspective on the relationships of idiosyncratic deals (i-deals) with organizational outcomes (i.e., client satisfaction) and investigates how and under which conditions these relationships manifest. On the basis of contagion theory, we proposed that the positive effects of i-deals will spill over within organizational units (indicated by reduced emotional exhaustion and enhanced collective commitment), which leads to increased customer satisfaction. Moreover, we postulated that the effects of i-deals would be more prominent in units with high Age Diversity, as i-deals are more important in units where people’s work-related needs are more heterogeneous due to the higher Diversity in employee Age. A study among 19,780 employees and 17,500 clients of a German public service organization showed support for the contagion model and that i-deals were negatively related to individual emotional exhaustion and subsequently positively related to collective commitment within units and Client satisfaction measured 6 months later. Emotional exhaustion and collective commitment mediated the relationships between i-deals and client satisfaction. Finally, we found that the relationships between i-deals and emotional exhaustion / client satisfaction were more strongly negative in units with high Age Diversity, rather than in units with low Age Diversity, indicating the benefits of i-deals within units with high Age Diversity to reduce emotional exhaustion and enhance client satisfaction.

  • Subjective Age Diversity, Age discrimination, turnover, and emotional exhaustion in companies
    Academy of Management Proceedings, 2017
    Co-Authors: Florian Kunze, Stephan A Boehm
    Abstract:

    This study contributes to the emerging literature on Age Diversity effects at the organizational level of analysis by comparing the role of chronological Age Diversity versus subjective Age Diversity. We hypothesize a model in which organizational-level subjective Age Diversity is positively related to a negative Age-discrimination climate, which in turn, contributes to higher collective perceptions of emotional exhaustion and turnover intention. The assumed relationships are tested in a sample of 96 German small and medium-sized companies with 16,274 employees participating. To circumvent common source problems, information for the various constructs was gathered from four different sources. To test our assumed relationships, we applied structural equation modeling and executed bootstrapping procedures to test the significance of the indirect effects. We received support for all assumed relationships. Given the potentially detrimental effects of high subjective Age Diversity in the workplace, the paper c…

Florian Kunze – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • It Matters How Old We Feel in Organizations : Testing a Multilevel Model of Organizational Subjective‐Age Diversity on Employee Outcomes
    Journal of Organizational Behavior, 2021
    Co-Authors: Florian Kunze, Stephan A Boehm, Heike Bruch
    Abstract:

    This study contributes to the emerging literature on Age Diversity effects at the organizational level of analysis by comparing the role of chronological-Age Diversity versus subjective-Age Diversity. We hypothesize a multilevel model in which organizationallevel subjective-Age Diversity is negatively related to bonding social capital within organizations, which, in turn, contributes to heightened employee engAgement and lowered turnover intentions. The assumed relationships are tested in a multilevel sample of 96 German small- and medium-sized companies with 16,274 employees participating. We gathered data from four different sources to circumvent common source problems and received support for most of the proposed relationships. Given the potentially detrimental effects of high subjective-Age Diversity in the workplace, the paper concludes with practical recommendations on how to manAge subjectiveAge Diversity in companies proactively.

  • The Moderating Role of Employees’ Age Distance on the Performance Effects of Workforce Age Diversity
    Academy of Management Proceedings, 2019
    Co-Authors: Kim De Meulenaere, Florian Kunze
    Abstract:

    Age Diversity in Western workforces is increasing. In this study, we offer a new conceptual and empirical perspective to this phenomenon by introducing the concept of employees’ Age distance to und…

  • Subjective Age Diversity, Age discrimination, turnover, and emotional exhaustion in companies
    Academy of Management Proceedings, 2017
    Co-Authors: Florian Kunze, Stephan A Boehm
    Abstract:

    This study contributes to the emerging literature on Age Diversity effects at the organizational level of analysis by comparing the role of chronological Age Diversity versus subjective Age Diversity. We hypothesize a model in which organizational-level subjective Age Diversity is positively related to a negative Age-discrimination climate, which in turn, contributes to higher collective perceptions of emotional exhaustion and turnover intention. The assumed relationships are tested in a sample of 96 German small and medium-sized companies with 16,274 employees participating. To circumvent common source problems, information for the various constructs was gathered from four different sources. To test our assumed relationships, we applied structural equation modeling and executed bootstrapping procedures to test the significance of the indirect effects. We received support for all assumed relationships. Given the potentially detrimental effects of high subjective Age Diversity in the workplace, the paper c…

Heike Bruch – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • It Matters How Old We Feel in Organizations : Testing a Multilevel Model of Organizational Subjective‐Age Diversity on Employee Outcomes
    Journal of Organizational Behavior, 2021
    Co-Authors: Florian Kunze, Stephan A Boehm, Heike Bruch
    Abstract:

    This study contributes to the emerging literature on Age Diversity effects at the organizational level of analysis by comparing the role of chronological-Age Diversity versus subjective-Age Diversity. We hypothesize a multilevel model in which organizationallevel subjective-Age Diversity is negatively related to bonding social capital within organizations, which, in turn, contributes to heightened employee engAgement and lowered turnover intentions. The assumed relationships are tested in a multilevel sample of 96 German small- and medium-sized companies with 16,274 employees participating. We gathered data from four different sources to circumvent common source problems and received support for most of the proposed relationships. Given the potentially detrimental effects of high subjective-Age Diversity in the workplace, the paper concludes with practical recommendations on how to manAge subjectiveAge Diversity in companies proactively.

  • Spotlight on AgeDiversity Climate: The Impact of Age‐Inclusive HR Practices on Firm‐Level Outcomes
    Personnel Psychology, 2013
    Co-Authors: Stephan A Boehm, Florian Kunze, Heike Bruch
    Abstract:

    This study investigates the emergence and the performance effects of an AgeDiversity climate at the organizational level of analysis. Building upon Kopelman and colleagues� (Kopelman, Brief, & Guzzo, 1990) climate model of firm productivity as well as Cox’s (1994) interactional model of cultural Diversity, we hypothesize a positive influence of Age-inclusive HR practices on the development of an organization-wide AgeDiversity climate, which in turn should be directly related to collective perceptions of social exchange and indirectly to firm performance and employees� collective turnover intentions. The assumed relationships are tested in a sample of 93 German small and medium-sized companies with 14,260 employees participating. To circumvent common source problems, information for the various constructs was gathered from 6 different sources. To test our assumed relationships, we applied structural equation modeling and executed bootstrapping procedures to test the significance of the indirect effects. We received support for all assumed relationships. The paper concludes with practical recommendations on how to establish and make use of a positive AgeDiversity climate.

  • spotlight on Age Diversity climate the impact of Age inclusive hr practices on firm level outcomes
    Personnel Psychology, 2013
    Co-Authors: Stephan A Boehm, Florian Kunze, Heike Bruch
    Abstract:

    This study investigates the emergence and the performance effects of an AgeDiversity climate at the organizational level of analysis. Building upon Kopelman and colleagues� (Kopelman, Brief, & Guzzo, 1990) climate model of firm productivity as well as Cox’s (1994) interactional model of cultural Diversity, we hypothesize a positive influence of Age-inclusive HR practices on the development of an organization-wide AgeDiversity climate, which in turn should be directly related to collective perceptions of social exchange and indirectly to firm performance and employees� collective turnover intentions. The assumed relationships are tested in a sample of 93 German small and medium-sized companies with 14,260 employees participating. To circumvent common source problems, information for the various constructs was gathered from 6 different sources. To test our assumed relationships, we applied structural equation modeling and executed bootstrapping procedures to test the significance of the indirect effects. We received support for all assumed relationships. The paper concludes with practical recommendations on how to establish and make use of a positive AgeDiversity climate.

Isabella M. Venter – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • INTERACT (3) – Designing Mobile Phone Interfaces for Age Diversity in South Africa: “One-World” versus Diverse “Islands”
    Human-Computer Interaction – INTERACT 2013, 2013
    Co-Authors: Karen Renaud, Rénette Blignaut, Isabella M. Venter
    Abstract:

    Designing for Diversity is a laudable aim. How to achieve this, in the context of mobile phone usAge by South African seniors, is a moot point. We considered this question from two possible perspectives: universal (one-world) versus focused design (designing for diverse “islands” of users). Each island would be characterised by a measure of relative homogeneity in terms of user interface needs. Our particular focus in this paper is Age Diversity. The universal approach attempts to deliver a design that can be all things to all people – meeting the needs of all users within one user interface. The islander approach delivers specific and different designs for islands within a diverse world. To determine which the best approach would be, in the South African context, we dispatched a team of student researchers to interview participants from an older generation, on a one-to-one basis. It was beneficial to deploy aspiring designers to carry out this research because we wanted to confront aspiring researchers with the differences between their own and other generations’ usAge of, and attitudes towards, mobile phones. Our study found that there were indeed significant Age-related differences in mobile phone usAge. Our research delivered insights that led to a model of the factors impacting mobile phone usAge of the senior generation as a series of filters between the user and their device. We conclude that the island approach is more suitable for Age-specific design. This approach might well become less fitting as a more technologically experienced population Ages, but at present there is a clear need for an Age-sensitive mobile interface design.

Karen Renaud – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Designing mobile phone interfaces for Age Diversity in South Africa: “One-world” versus diverse “islands”
    Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics), 2013
    Co-Authors: Karen Renaud, Rénette Blignaut, Isabella Venter
    Abstract:

    Designing for Diversity is a laudable aim. How to achieve this, in the context of mobile phone usAge by South African seniors, is a moot point. We considered this question from two possible perspectives: universal (one-world) versus focused design (designing for diverse “islands” of users). Each island would be characterised by a measure of relative homogeneity in terms of user interface needs. Our particular focus in this paper is Age Diversity. The univer-sal approach attempts to deliver a design that can be all things to all people – meeting the needs of all users within one user interface. The islander approach delivers specific and different designs for islands within a diverse world. To de-termine which the best approach would be, in the South African context, we dispatched a team of student researchers to interview participants from an older generation, on a one-to-one basis. It was beneficial to deploy aspiring designers to carry out this research because we wanted to confront aspiring researchers with the differences between their own and other generations’ usAge of, and at-titudes towards, mobile phones. Our study found that there were indeed signifi-cant Age-related differences in mobile phone usAge. Our research delivered in-sights that led to a model of the factors impacting mobile phone usAge of the senior generation as a series of filters between the user and their device. We conclude that the island approach is more suitable for Age-specific design. This approach might well become less fitting as a more technologically experienced population Ages, but at present there is a clear need for an Age-sensitive mobile interface design.

  • INTERACT (3) – Designing Mobile Phone Interfaces for Age Diversity in South Africa: “One-World” versus Diverse “Islands”
    Human-Computer Interaction – INTERACT 2013, 2013
    Co-Authors: Karen Renaud, Rénette Blignaut, Isabella M. Venter
    Abstract:

    Designing for Diversity is a laudable aim. How to achieve this, in the context of mobile phone usAge by South African seniors, is a moot point. We considered this question from two possible perspectives: universal (one-world) versus focused design (designing for diverse “islands” of users). Each island would be characterised by a measure of relative homogeneity in terms of user interface needs. Our particular focus in this paper is Age Diversity. The universal approach attempts to deliver a design that can be all things to all people – meeting the needs of all users within one user interface. The islander approach delivers specific and different designs for islands within a diverse world. To determine which the best approach would be, in the South African context, we dispatched a team of student researchers to interview participants from an older generation, on a one-to-one basis. It was beneficial to deploy aspiring designers to carry out this research because we wanted to confront aspiring researchers with the differences between their own and other generations’ usAge of, and attitudes towards, mobile phones. Our study found that there were indeed significant Age-related differences in mobile phone usAge. Our research delivered insights that led to a model of the factors impacting mobile phone usAge of the senior generation as a series of filters between the user and their device. We conclude that the island approach is more suitable for Age-specific design. This approach might well become less fitting as a more technologically experienced population Ages, but at present there is a clear need for an Age-sensitive mobile interface design.