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Erdman Palmore – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • encyclopedia of Ageism
    , 2016
    Co-Authors: Erdman Palmore, Laurence G Branch, Diana K Harris
    Abstract:

    * About the Editors * Contributors * Foreword (Robert N. Butler) * Preface * List of Entries * Abuse in nursing homes * Abuse by elders in nursing homes * Advertising * African Americans * Age conflict * Age denial * Age inequality * Age norms * Age segregation * Age stratification * Aged as a minority group * Ageism in the Bible * Ageism survey * Age-specific public programs * Alcoholism * Antiaging medicine * Architecture * Art * Arts * Assisted living * Attribution theory * Benefits of aging * Biological definitions of aging * Blaming the aged * Books * Botox * Cards * Change strategies * Changes in attitudes * Children’s attitudes * Children’s literature * Churches * Cohorts * Consent to treatment * Cost-benefit analysis * Costs of Ageism * Criminal victimization * Cross-cultural Ageism * Cultural lag * Cultural sources of Ageism * Definitions * Demographic trends * Dentistry * Disability * Discounts * Disengagement theory * Driver’s license testing * Education * Employment discrimination * Ethical issues * Euphemisms * Face-lifts * Facts on Aging Quiz * Facts on Aging and Mental Health Quiz * Family * Financial abuse * Functional age * Future of Ageism * Generational equity * Geriatrics * Gerontocracy * Gerontology * Health care * Hispanics * History * HIV/AIDS * Hollywood * Housing * Human rights of older persons * Humor * Hypertension * Individual sources of Ageism * Intergenerational projects * Isolation * Japan * Journalism * Language * Legal review program * Legal system * Literature * Living wills * Mandatory retirement of judges * Measuring Ageism in children * Medical students * Memory and cognitive function * Memory stereotypes * Mental illness * Modernization theory * Nursing * Nursing homes * Organizations opposing Ageism * Patronizing * Pension bias * Perpetual youth * Physical therapy * Politics * Positive Aging Newsletter * Public policy * Reducing Ageism * Responses to Ageism * Retirement communities * Role expectations * Scapegoating * Self-fulfilling propprophecy * Semantic differential scale * Senior centers * Sexism * Sexuality * Slogans * Social psychology * Social Security * Societal Ageism * Songs * Stage theory * Stereotypes * Subcultures * Successful aging * Suicide * Tax breaks * Television * Terms preferred by older people * Theories of aging * Transportation * Types of ageists * Typologies * Unconscious Ageism * Voice quality * Index * Reference Notes Included

  • self reported Ageism in social work practitioners and students
    Journal of Gerontological Social Work, 2009
    Co-Authors: Priscilla D. Allen, Katie E. Cherry, Erdman Palmore
    Abstract:

    In this study, we focus on self-reported Ageism in college students and social service providers using the Relating to Older People Evaluation (ROPE; Cherry & Palmore, 2008). The ROPE is a 20-item questionnaire that measures positive and negative ageist behaviors that people engage in during everyday life. Participants included undergraduate and graduate social work students and practicing social service providers in the nursing home and mental health setting. Findings indicate that people of varying educational backgrounds and occupational experience in social services readily admit to positive ageist behaviors. Item analyses revealed similarities and differences between groups in the most and least frequent forms of Ageism endorsed. Ageism as a social phenomenon with implications related to social work policy and practice is discussed.

  • relating to older people evaluation rope a measure of self reported Ageism
    Educational Gerontology, 2008
    Co-Authors: Katie E. Cherry, Erdman Palmore
    Abstract:

    The Relating to Older People Evaluation (ROPE) is a 20-item questionnaire that measures positive and negative ageist behaviors that people may engage in during everyday life. In this article, we report the first findings from several administrations of the ROPE along with initial psychometric information on the instrument. Respondents were college students, community-dwelling older adults, and persons affiliated with a university community. Results indicate that most people of all ages readily admit to positive ageist behaviors. Younger and older adults appear to participate in similar amounts of ageist behavior. Analyses by gender indicated that women endorsed the positive Ageism items more often than did men. Psychometric analyses yielded estimates of adequate test-retest reliability and internal consistency reliability. Implications for current views of Ageism as a social phenomenon and strategies for reducing ageist behaviors in everyday life are discussed.

Susan T Fiske – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • a prescriptive intergenerational tension Ageism scale succession identity and consumption sic
    Psychological Assessment, 2013
    Co-Authors: Michael S North, Susan T Fiske
    Abstract:

    We introduce a novel Ageism scale, focusing on prescriptive beliefs concerning potential intergenerational tensions: active, envied resource succession, symbolic identity avoidance, and passive, sharedresource consumption (SIC). Four studies (2,010 total participants) were used to develop the scale. Exploratory factor analysis formed an initial 20-item, 3-factor solution (Study 1). The scale converges appropriately with other prejudice measures and diverges from other social control measures (Study 2). It diverges from antiyouth Ageism (Study 3). The Study 4 experiment yielded both predictive and divergent validity apropos another Ageism measure. Structural equation modeling confirmed model fit across all studies. Per an intergenerational-tension focus, younger people consistently scored the highest. As generational equity issues intensify, the scale provides a contemporary tool for current and future Ageism research.

  • subtyping Ageism policy issues in succession and consumption
    Social Issues and Policy Review, 2013
    Co-Authors: Michael S North, Susan T Fiske
    Abstract:

    Ageism research tends to lump “older people” together as one group, as do policy matters that conceptualize everyone over-65 as “senior.” This approach is problematic primarily because it often fails to represent accurately a rapidly growing, diverse, and healthy older population. In light of this, we review the Ageism literature, emphasizing the importance of distinguishing between the still-active “young-old” and the potentially more impaired “old-old” (Neugarten, 1974). We argue that Ageism theory has disproportionately focused on the old-old and differentiate the forms of age discrimination that apparently target each elder subgroup. In particular, we highlight the young-old’s plights predominantly in the workplace and tensions concerning succession of desirable resources; by contrast, old-old predicaments likely center on consumption of shared resources outside of the workplace. For both social psychological researchers and policymakers, accurately subtyping Ageism will help society best accommodate a burgeoning, diverse older population.

Michael S North – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • a prescriptive intergenerational tension Ageism scale succession identity and consumption sic
    Psychological Assessment, 2013
    Co-Authors: Michael S North, Susan T Fiske
    Abstract:

    We introduce a novel Ageism scale, focusing on prescriptive beliefs concerning potential intergenerational tensions: active, envied resource succession, symbolic identity avoidance, and passive, sharedresource consumption (SIC). Four studies (2,010 total participants) were used to develop the scale. Exploratory factor analysis formed an initial 20-item, 3-factor solution (Study 1). The scale converges appropriately with other prejudice measures and diverges from other social control measures (Study 2). It diverges from antiyouth Ageism (Study 3). The Study 4 experiment yielded both predictive and divergent validity apropos another Ageism measure. Structural equation modeling confirmed model fit across all studies. Per an intergenerational-tension focus, younger people consistently scored the highest. As generational equity issues intensify, the scale provides a contemporary tool for current and future Ageism research.

  • subtyping Ageism policy issues in succession and consumption
    Social Issues and Policy Review, 2013
    Co-Authors: Michael S North, Susan T Fiske
    Abstract:

    Ageism research tends to lump “older people” together as one group, as do policy matters that conceptualize everyone over-65 as “senior.” This approach is problematic primarily because it often fails to represent accurately a rapidly growing, diverse, and healthy older population. In light of this, we review the Ageism literature, emphasizing the importance of distinguishing between the still-active “young-old” and the potentially more impaired “old-old” (Neugarten, 1974). We argue that Ageism theory has disproportionately focused on the old-old and differentiate the forms of age discrimination that apparently target each elder subgroup. In particular, we highlight the young-old’s plights predominantly in the workplace and tensions concerning succession of desirable resources; by contrast, old-old predicaments likely center on consumption of shared resources outside of the workplace. For both social psychological researchers and policymakers, accurately subtyping Ageism will help society best accommodate a burgeoning, diverse older population.

Brigida Palatino – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Ageism can be hazardous to women s health Ageism sexism and stereotypes of older women in the healthcare system
    Journal of Social Issues, 2016
    Co-Authors: Joan C Chrisler, Angela Barney, Brigida Palatino
    Abstract:

    Women tend to live longer than men, and thus typically have more interactions with the healthcare system in old age than men do. Ageism and stereotypes of older people in general can have an important impact on elders’ physical and mental health and well-being. For example, internalized negative stereotypes can produce self-fulfilling prophecies through stereotype embodiment and contribute to weakness and dependency. Ageist beliefs and stereotypes can interfere with health care seeking as well as with diagnosis and treatment recommendations; they can, for example, contribute to gender disparities in the health care of older adults if older women are perceived as too frail to undergo aggressive treatments. Ageism also results in disrespectful treatment of older patients, which is communicated through baby talk and other forms of infantilization or the shrugging off of patients’ complaints and concerns as “just old age.” Intersectional identities can result in a cumulative burden for older women patients who may have a history of disrespectful treatment for other reasons (e.g., sexism, racism, bias against lesbians). Reduction of Ageism and sexism and promotion of more realistic and diverse views of older women could improve doctor–patient relationships, facilitate adherence to treatment regimens, and reduce disparities in health and health care.

Priscilla D. Allen – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • AGING KNOWLEDGE AND SELF-REPORTED Ageism
    Innovation in Aging, 2019
    Co-Authors: Katie E. Cherry, Marla J. Erwin, Priscilla D. Allen
    Abstract:

    Abstract The term, Ageism, refers to any form of personal or institutional prejudice or discrimination based on chronological age. Ageism may encompass attitudes and prejudices, as well as behaviors, highlighting the complex nature of ageist behaviors observed among students and professionals alike (Allen, Cherry, & Palmore, 2009). We examined the prevalence of self-reported ageist behaviors in a sample of college students who ranged in age from 18 to 44 years to test the hypothesis that aging knowledge would be associated with self-reported ageist behaviors (positive and negative). The study sample was comprised of adults who were enrolled in classes at Louisiana State University (n = 110). Most of these students were traditional aged college students (18-25 years old). Participants completed the Relating to Older People Evaluation (ROPE; Cherry & Palmore, 2008), the Facts on Aging Quiz (FAQ; Palmore, 1998), and the Knowledge of Memory Aging Questionnaire (KMAQ: Cherry et al., 2003). Results indicated that positive ageist behaviors were more frequent than negative ageist behaviors. Men endorsed positive and negative Ageism items more than women reported. Follow-up analyses on participants’ responses to the two aging knowledge questionnaires showed that increased knowledge of aging was significantly correlated with diminished reports of negative ageist behaviors, after controlling for age and gender. These results imply that self-reported ageist behaviors are associated with aging knowledge. Strengthening college curricula by including course offerings in adult development and aging may improve self-reported ageist behaviors among college students.

  • self reported Ageism in social work practitioners and students
    Journal of Gerontological Social Work, 2009
    Co-Authors: Priscilla D. Allen, Katie E. Cherry, Erdman Palmore
    Abstract:

    In this study, we focus on self-reported Ageism in college students and social service providers using the Relating to Older People Evaluation (ROPE; Cherry & Palmore, 2008). The ROPE is a 20-item questionnaire that measures positive and negative ageist behaviors that people engage in during everyday life. Participants included undergraduate and graduate social work students and practicing social service providers in the nursing home and mental health setting. Findings indicate that people of varying educational backgrounds and occupational experience in social services readily admit to positive ageist behaviors. Item analyses revealed similarities and differences between groups in the most and least frequent forms of Ageism endorsed. Ageism as a social phenomenon with implications related to social work policy and practice is discussed.