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Agency Regulation

The Experts below are selected from a list of 117 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Daniel Cash – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Credit Rating Agency Regulation in the UK If and When Article 50 is Invoked: Round Holes for a Square Peg?
    European Business Law Review, 2017
    Co-Authors: Daniel Cash

    Abstract:

    The decision taken by British voters to leave the European Union has created uncertainty in all walks of life, ranging from everyday concerns to professional anxiety. In this article, the focus is on the UK’s Regulation of the Credit Rating Industry if and when Article 50 is invoked. The aim of the article is to examine some potential options available to policymakers and legislators in terms of their validity for taking on such an important task. Whilst it is not guaranteed that the UK will take sole responsibility for the Regulation of credit rating agencies in its jurisdiction, it is likely. Therefore, assessing the credentials of the relevant agencies is a worthwhile endeavour. Yet, each option comes with its own set of issues, as will be discussed, so the article concludes by offering an option that may negate such issues whilst continuing to regulate the credit rating agencies efficiently and effectively.

  • Credit rating Agency Regulation after the UK’s EU membership referendum
    , 2016
    Co-Authors: Daniel Cash

    Abstract:

    Assesses the implications of the UK’s decision to withdraw from the EU for the Regulation of its credit rating industry. Discusses the current rules of the Credit Rating Agencies Regulations 2010. Considers how the likelihood that a “post-Brexit” UK will be increasingly dependent on its financial services sector might affect the approach taken towards its Regulation.

  • credit rating Agency Regulation after the uk s european union membership referendum
    Social Science Research Network, 2016
    Co-Authors: Daniel Cash

    Abstract:

    In response to the decision by British voters to leave the European Union in the recent referendum, this article discusses what may lie ahead for the Regulation of the credit rating industry in the U.K. With the withdrawal from the Union meaning that the U.K. must now establish its own distinct Laws that will govern the Rating Industry, having relied upon the EU beforehand, understanding what may affect the approach taken is of concern for this short article.

Judith A. Mcmorrow – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Zacharias’s Prophecy: The Federalization of Legal Ethics Through Legislative, Court, and Agency Regulation
    The San Diego law review, 2011
    Co-Authors: Daniel R Coquillette, Judith A. Mcmorrow

    Abstract:

    In his 1994 seminal article on Federalizing Legal Ethics, Prof. Fred Zacharias examined the need for a national and uniform code of ethics for attorneys. Prof. Zacharias was correct that there has been increasing pressure to federalize legal ethics, but that process is occurring not through articulation of national norms but rather through decentralized contextualization of attorney conduct norms. Federal agencies that direct securities practice, immigration, tax, patent, labor and many other areas of federal practice are increasingly supplementing state Regulations to specifically regulate the attorneys who appear before their agencies. Targeted substantive federal law and treaty obligations also increasingly apply to attorneys. The effect is to slowly move the center of gravity of attorney Regulation toward a complex web of federal Regulation in the many areas that involve federal interests. This process offers some important benefits of contextualization and carries some risk, including conflicts between federal and state norms. Our robust experience with federalism provides a mechanism to work through these tensions and differences.

  • zacharias s prophecy the federalization of legal ethics through legislative court and Agency Regulation
    The San Diego law review, 2011
    Co-Authors: Daniel R Coquillette, Judith A. Mcmorrow

    Abstract:

    In his 1994 seminal article on Federalizing Legal Ethics, Prof. Fred Zacharias examined the need for a national and uniform code of ethics for attorneys. Prof. Zacharias was correct that there has been increasing pressure to federalize legal ethics, but that process is occurring not through articulation of national norms but rather through decentralized contextualization of attorney conduct norms. Federal agencies that direct securities practice, immigration, tax, patent, labor and many other areas of federal practice are increasingly supplementing state Regulations to specifically regulate the attorneys who appear before their agencies. Targeted substantive federal law and treaty obligations also increasingly apply to attorneys. The effect is to slowly move the center of gravity of attorney Regulation toward a complex web of federal Regulation in the many areas that involve federal interests. This process offers some important benefits of contextualization and carries some risk, including conflicts between federal and state norms. Our robust experience with federalism provides a mechanism to work through these tensions and differences.

Daniel R Coquillette – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Zacharias’s Prophecy: The Federalization of Legal Ethics Through Legislative, Court, and Agency Regulation
    The San Diego law review, 2011
    Co-Authors: Daniel R Coquillette, Judith A. Mcmorrow

    Abstract:

    In his 1994 seminal article on Federalizing Legal Ethics, Prof. Fred Zacharias examined the need for a national and uniform code of ethics for attorneys. Prof. Zacharias was correct that there has been increasing pressure to federalize legal ethics, but that process is occurring not through articulation of national norms but rather through decentralized contextualization of attorney conduct norms. Federal agencies that direct securities practice, immigration, tax, patent, labor and many other areas of federal practice are increasingly supplementing state Regulations to specifically regulate the attorneys who appear before their agencies. Targeted substantive federal law and treaty obligations also increasingly apply to attorneys. The effect is to slowly move the center of gravity of attorney Regulation toward a complex web of federal Regulation in the many areas that involve federal interests. This process offers some important benefits of contextualization and carries some risk, including conflicts between federal and state norms. Our robust experience with federalism provides a mechanism to work through these tensions and differences.

  • zacharias s prophecy the federalization of legal ethics through legislative court and Agency Regulation
    The San Diego law review, 2011
    Co-Authors: Daniel R Coquillette, Judith A. Mcmorrow

    Abstract:

    In his 1994 seminal article on Federalizing Legal Ethics, Prof. Fred Zacharias examined the need for a national and uniform code of ethics for attorneys. Prof. Zacharias was correct that there has been increasing pressure to federalize legal ethics, but that process is occurring not through articulation of national norms but rather through decentralized contextualization of attorney conduct norms. Federal agencies that direct securities practice, immigration, tax, patent, labor and many other areas of federal practice are increasingly supplementing state Regulations to specifically regulate the attorneys who appear before their agencies. Targeted substantive federal law and treaty obligations also increasingly apply to attorneys. The effect is to slowly move the center of gravity of attorney Regulation toward a complex web of federal Regulation in the many areas that involve federal interests. This process offers some important benefits of contextualization and carries some risk, including conflicts between federal and state norms. Our robust experience with federalism provides a mechanism to work through these tensions and differences.