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Aggregate Extraction

The Experts below are selected from a list of 690 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Ilse De Mesel – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • turning off the drip data rich information poor rationalising monitoring with a focus on marine renewable energy developments and the benthos
    Renewable & Sustainable Energy Reviews, 2017
    Co-Authors: Thomas A Wilding, Andrew B. Gill, Arjen Boon, Jean-claude Dauvin, Jean-philippe Pezy, Urszula Janas, Liis Rostin, Emma V Sheehan, Francis Obeirn, Ilse De Mesel

    Abstract:

    Marine renewable energy developments (MREDs) are rapidly expanding in size and number as society strives to maintain electricity generation whilst simultaneously reducing climate-change linked CO2 emissions. MREDs are part of an ongoing large-scale modification of coastal waters that also includes activities such as commercial fishing, shipping, Aggregate Extraction, aquaculture, dredging, spoil-dumping and oil and gas exploitation. It is increasingly accepted that developments, of any kind, should only proceed if they are ecologically sustainable and will not reduce current or future delivery of ecosystem services. The benthos underpins crucial marine ecosystem services yet, in relation to MREDs, is currently poorly monitored: current monitoring programmes are extensive and costly yet provide little useful data in relation to ecosystem-scale-related changes, a situation called ‘data-rich, information-poor’ (DRIP). MRED –benthic interactions may cause changes that are of a sufficient scale to change ecosystem services provision, particularly in terms of fisheries and biodiversity and, via trophic linkages, change the distribution of fish, birds and mammals. The production of DRIPy data should be eliminated and the resources used instead to address relevant questions that are logically bounded in time and space. Efforts should target identifying metrics of change that can be linked to ecosystem function or service provision, particularly where those metrics show strongly non-linear effects in relation to the stressor. Future monitoring should also be designed to contribute towards predictive ecosystem models and be sufficiently robust and understandable to facilitate transparent, auditable and timely decision-making.

  • Turning off the DRIP (‘Data-rich, information-poor’) – rationalising monitoring with a focus on marine renewable energy developments and the benthos
    Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, 2017
    Co-Authors: Thomas A Wilding, Andrew B. Gill, Arjen Boon, Emma Sheehan, Jean-claude Dauvin, Jean-philippe Pezy, Francis O'beirn, Urszula Janas, Liis Rostin, Ilse De Mesel

    Abstract:

    Marine renewable energy developments (MREDs) are rapidly expanding in size and number as society strives to maintain electricity generation whilst simultaneously reducing climate-change linked CO2emissions. MREDs are part of an ongoing large-scale modification of coastal waters that also includes activities such as commercial fishing, shipping, Aggregate Extraction, aquaculture, dredging, spoil-dumping and oil and gas exploitation. It is increasingly accepted that developments, of any kind, should only proceed if they are ecologically sustainable and will not reduce current or future delivery of ecosystem services. The benthos underpins crucial marine ecosystem services yet, in relation to MREDs, is currently poorly monitored: current monitoring programmes are extensive and costly yet provide little useful data in relation to ecosystem-scale-related changes, a situation called ‘data-rich, information-poor’ (DRIP). MRED –benthic interactions may cause changes that are of a sufficient scale to change ecosystem services provision, particularly in terms of fisheries and biodiversity and, via trophic linkages, change the distribution of fish, birds and mammals. The production of DRIPy data should be eliminated and the resources used instead to address relevant questions that are logically bounded in time and space. Efforts should target identifying metrics of change that can be linked to ecosystem function or service provision, particularly where those metrics show strongly non-linear effects in relation to the stressor. Future monitoring should also be designed to contribute towards predictive ecosystem models and be sufficiently robust and understandable to facilitate transparent, auditable and timely decision-making.

Keith M. Cooper – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • The effects of marine sand and gravel Extraction on the sediment composition and macrofaunal community of a commercial dredging site (15 years post-dredging).
    Marine pollution bulletin, 2015
    Co-Authors: Georgia A Waye-barker, Paul Mcilwaine, Sophie Lozach, Keith M. Cooper

    Abstract:

    A prediction that faunal recovery of a marine Aggregate Extraction site subjected to high dredging intensity was likely to take 15-20 years was investigated. Samples were collected at the high dredging intensity site and two reference sites in 2011 (15 years post-dredging). Results indicated that the high site had similar sediment characteristics to the reference sites by 2011. Macrofaunal data analyses showed no difference between the values of all calculated univariate measures (abundance, number of taxa, biomass and evenness) between the high and reference sites. Multivariate analyses found that the macrofaunal community at the high site was comparable to those of the reference sites by 2011. Overall, the results supported the predicted recovery time. The findings of the study suggest that persistent physical impacts prolonged the biological recovery of the high site.

  • can the benefits of physical seabed restoration justify the costs an assessment of a disused Aggregate Extraction site off the thames estuary uk
    Marine Pollution Bulletin, 2013
    Co-Authors: Keith M. Cooper, Suzanne Ware, Daryl Burdon, Jonathan P Atkins, Laura Weiss, Paul J Somerfield, Michael Elliott, Kerry Turner, Chris Vivian

    Abstract:

    Physical and biological seabed impacts can persist long after the cessation of marine Aggregate dredging. Whilst small-scale experimental studies have shown that it may be possible to mitigate such impacts, it is unclear whether the costs of restoration are justified on an industrial scale. Here we explore this question using a case study off the Thames Estuary, UK. By understanding the nature and scale of persistent impacts, we identify possible techniques to restore the physical properties of the seabed, and the costs and the likelihood of success. An analysis of the ecosystem services and goods/benefits produced by the site is used to determine whether intervention is justified. Whilst a comparison of costs and benefits at this site suggests restoration would not be warranted, the analysis is site-specific. We emphasise the need to better define what is, and is not, an acceptable seabed condition post-dredging.

  • Setting limits for acceptable change in sediment particle size composition: testing a new approach to managing marine Aggregate dredging.
    Marine Pollution Bulletin, 2013
    Co-Authors: Keith M. Cooper

    Abstract:

    A baseline dataset from 2005 was used to identify the spatial distribution of macrofaunal assemblages across the eastern English Channel. The range of sediment composition found in association with each assemblage was used to define limits for acceptable change at ten licensed marine Aggregate Extraction areas. Sediment data acquired in 2010, 4 years after the onset of dredging, were used to assess whether conditions remained within the acceptable limits. Despite the observed changes in sediment composition, the composition of sediments in and around nine Extraction areas remained within pre-defined acceptable limits. At the tenth site, some of the observed changes within the licence area were judged to have gone beyond the acceptable limits. Implications of the changes are discussed, and appropriate management measures identified. The approach taken in this study offers a simple, objective and cost-effective method for assessing the significance of change, and could simplify the existing monitoring regime.

Thomas A Wilding – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • turning off the drip data rich information poor rationalising monitoring with a focus on marine renewable energy developments and the benthos
    Renewable & Sustainable Energy Reviews, 2017
    Co-Authors: Thomas A Wilding, Andrew B. Gill, Arjen Boon, Jean-claude Dauvin, Jean-philippe Pezy, Urszula Janas, Liis Rostin, Emma V Sheehan, Francis Obeirn, Ilse De Mesel

    Abstract:

    Marine renewable energy developments (MREDs) are rapidly expanding in size and number as society strives to maintain electricity generation whilst simultaneously reducing climate-change linked CO2 emissions. MREDs are part of an ongoing large-scale modification of coastal waters that also includes activities such as commercial fishing, shipping, Aggregate Extraction, aquaculture, dredging, spoil-dumping and oil and gas exploitation. It is increasingly accepted that developments, of any kind, should only proceed if they are ecologically sustainable and will not reduce current or future delivery of ecosystem services. The benthos underpins crucial marine ecosystem services yet, in relation to MREDs, is currently poorly monitored: current monitoring programmes are extensive and costly yet provide little useful data in relation to ecosystem-scale-related changes, a situation called ‘data-rich, information-poor’ (DRIP). MRED –benthic interactions may cause changes that are of a sufficient scale to change ecosystem services provision, particularly in terms of fisheries and biodiversity and, via trophic linkages, change the distribution of fish, birds and mammals. The production of DRIPy data should be eliminated and the resources used instead to address relevant questions that are logically bounded in time and space. Efforts should target identifying metrics of change that can be linked to ecosystem function or service provision, particularly where those metrics show strongly non-linear effects in relation to the stressor. Future monitoring should also be designed to contribute towards predictive ecosystem models and be sufficiently robust and understandable to facilitate transparent, auditable and timely decision-making.

  • Turning off the DRIP (‘Data-rich, information-poor’) – rationalising monitoring with a focus on marine renewable energy developments and the benthos
    Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, 2017
    Co-Authors: Thomas A Wilding, Andrew B. Gill, Arjen Boon, Emma Sheehan, Jean-claude Dauvin, Jean-philippe Pezy, Francis O'beirn, Urszula Janas, Liis Rostin, Ilse De Mesel

    Abstract:

    Marine renewable energy developments (MREDs) are rapidly expanding in size and number as society strives to maintain electricity generation whilst simultaneously reducing climate-change linked CO2emissions. MREDs are part of an ongoing large-scale modification of coastal waters that also includes activities such as commercial fishing, shipping, Aggregate Extraction, aquaculture, dredging, spoil-dumping and oil and gas exploitation. It is increasingly accepted that developments, of any kind, should only proceed if they are ecologically sustainable and will not reduce current or future delivery of ecosystem services. The benthos underpins crucial marine ecosystem services yet, in relation to MREDs, is currently poorly monitored: current monitoring programmes are extensive and costly yet provide little useful data in relation to ecosystem-scale-related changes, a situation called ‘data-rich, information-poor’ (DRIP). MRED –benthic interactions may cause changes that are of a sufficient scale to change ecosystem services provision, particularly in terms of fisheries and biodiversity and, via trophic linkages, change the distribution of fish, birds and mammals. The production of DRIPy data should be eliminated and the resources used instead to address relevant questions that are logically bounded in time and space. Efforts should target identifying metrics of change that can be linked to ecosystem function or service provision, particularly where those metrics show strongly non-linear effects in relation to the stressor. Future monitoring should also be designed to contribute towards predictive ecosystem models and be sufficiently robust and understandable to facilitate transparent, auditable and timely decision-making.