Aggressive Interaction - Explore the Science & Experts | ideXlab

Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

Aggressive Interaction

The Experts below are selected from a list of 207 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Aggressive Interaction – Free Register to Access Experts & Abstracts

Andrew Whiten – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • living together behavior and welfare in single and mixed species groups of capuchin cebus apella and squirrel monkeys saimiri sciureus
    American Journal of Primatology, 2010
    Co-Authors: Rebecca Leonardi, Hannah M Buchanansmith, Vala Rie Dufour, Charlotte Macdonald, Andrew Whiten
    Abstract:

    There are potential advantages of housing primates in mixed species exhibits for both the visiting public and the primates themselves. If the primates naturally associate in the wild, it may be more educational and enjoyable for the public to view. Increases in social complexity and stimulation may be enriching for the primates. However, mixed species exhibits might also create welfare problems such as stress from interspecific aggression. We present data on the behavior of single and mixed species groups of capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella) and squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) housed at the Living Links to Human Evolution Research Centre in the Royal Zoological Society of Scotland’s Edinburgh Zoo. These species associate in the wild, gaining foraging benefits and decreased predation. But Cebus are also predators themselves with potential risks for the smaller Saimiri. To study their living together we took scan samples at ≥15 min intervals on single (n=109) and mixed species groups (n=152), and all occurrences of intraspecific aggression and interspecific Interactions were recorded. We found no evidence of chronic stress and Saimiri actively chose to associate with Cebus. On 79% of scans, the two species simultaneously occupied the same part of their enclosure. No vertical displacement was observed. Interspecific Interactions were common (>2.5/hr), and equally divided among mildly Aggressive, neutral, and affiliative Interactions such as play. Only one Aggressive Interaction involved physical contact and was non-injurious. Aggressive Interactions were mostly (65%) displacements and vocal exchanges, initiated almost equally by Cebus and Saimiri. Modifications to the enclosure were successful in reducing these mildly Aggressive Interactions with affiliative Interactions increasing in frequency and diversity. Our data suggest that in carefully designed, large enclosures, naturally associating monkeys are able to live harmoniously and are enriched by each other. Am. J. Primatol. 72:33–47, 2010. © 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  • living together behavior and welfare in single and mixed species groups of capuchin cebus apella and squirrel monkeys saimiri sciureus
    American Journal of Primatology, 2010
    Co-Authors: Rebecca Leonardi, Hannah M Buchanansmith, Vala Rie Dufour, Charlotte Macdonald, Andrew Whiten
    Abstract:

    There are potential advantages of housing primates in mixed species exhibits for both the visiting public and the primates themselves. If the primates naturally associate in the wild, it may be more educational and enjoyable for the public to view. Increases in social complexity and stimulation may be enriching for the primates. However, mixed species exhibits might also create welfare problems such as stress from interspecific aggression. We present data on the behavior of single and mixed species groups of capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella) and squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) housed at the Living Links to Human Evolution Research Centre in the Royal Zoological Society of Scotland’s Edinburgh Zoo. These species associate in the wild, gaining foraging benefits and decreased predation. But Cebus are also predators themselves with potential risks for the smaller Saimiri. To study their living together we took scan samples at > or =15 min intervals on single (n=109) and mixed species groups (n=152), and all occurrences of intraspecific aggression and interspecific Interactions were recorded. We found no evidence of chronic stress and Saimiri actively chose to associate with Cebus. On 79% of scans, the two species simultaneously occupied the same part of their enclosure. No vertical displacement was observed. Interspecific Interactions were common (>2.5/hr), and equally divided among mildly Aggressive, neutral, and affiliative Interactions such as play. Only one Aggressive Interaction involved physical contact and was non-injurious. Aggressive Interactions were mostly (65%) displacements and vocal exchanges, initiated almost equally by Cebus and Saimiri. Modifications to the enclosure were successful in reducing these mildly Aggressive Interactions with affiliative Interactions increasing in frequency and diversity. Our data suggest that in carefully designed, large enclosures, naturally associating monkeys are able to live harmoniously and are enriched by each other.

Rebecca Leonardi – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • living together behavior and welfare in single and mixed species groups of capuchin cebus apella and squirrel monkeys saimiri sciureus
    American Journal of Primatology, 2010
    Co-Authors: Rebecca Leonardi, Hannah M Buchanansmith, Vala Rie Dufour, Charlotte Macdonald, Andrew Whiten
    Abstract:

    There are potential advantages of housing primates in mixed species exhibits for both the visiting public and the primates themselves. If the primates naturally associate in the wild, it may be more educational and enjoyable for the public to view. Increases in social complexity and stimulation may be enriching for the primates. However, mixed species exhibits might also create welfare problems such as stress from interspecific aggression. We present data on the behavior of single and mixed species groups of capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella) and squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) housed at the Living Links to Human Evolution Research Centre in the Royal Zoological Society of Scotland’s Edinburgh Zoo. These species associate in the wild, gaining foraging benefits and decreased predation. But Cebus are also predators themselves with potential risks for the smaller Saimiri. To study their living together we took scan samples at ≥15 min intervals on single (n=109) and mixed species groups (n=152), and all occurrences of intraspecific aggression and interspecific Interactions were recorded. We found no evidence of chronic stress and Saimiri actively chose to associate with Cebus. On 79% of scans, the two species simultaneously occupied the same part of their enclosure. No vertical displacement was observed. Interspecific Interactions were common (>2.5/hr), and equally divided among mildly Aggressive, neutral, and affiliative Interactions such as play. Only one Aggressive Interaction involved physical contact and was non-injurious. Aggressive Interactions were mostly (65%) displacements and vocal exchanges, initiated almost equally by Cebus and Saimiri. Modifications to the enclosure were successful in reducing these mildly Aggressive Interactions with affiliative Interactions increasing in frequency and diversity. Our data suggest that in carefully designed, large enclosures, naturally associating monkeys are able to live harmoniously and are enriched by each other. Am. J. Primatol. 72:33–47, 2010. © 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  • living together behavior and welfare in single and mixed species groups of capuchin cebus apella and squirrel monkeys saimiri sciureus
    American Journal of Primatology, 2010
    Co-Authors: Rebecca Leonardi, Hannah M Buchanansmith, Vala Rie Dufour, Charlotte Macdonald, Andrew Whiten
    Abstract:

    There are potential advantages of housing primates in mixed species exhibits for both the visiting public and the primates themselves. If the primates naturally associate in the wild, it may be more educational and enjoyable for the public to view. Increases in social complexity and stimulation may be enriching for the primates. However, mixed species exhibits might also create welfare problems such as stress from interspecific aggression. We present data on the behavior of single and mixed species groups of capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella) and squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) housed at the Living Links to Human Evolution Research Centre in the Royal Zoological Society of Scotland’s Edinburgh Zoo. These species associate in the wild, gaining foraging benefits and decreased predation. But Cebus are also predators themselves with potential risks for the smaller Saimiri. To study their living together we took scan samples at > or =15 min intervals on single (n=109) and mixed species groups (n=152), and all occurrences of intraspecific aggression and interspecific Interactions were recorded. We found no evidence of chronic stress and Saimiri actively chose to associate with Cebus. On 79% of scans, the two species simultaneously occupied the same part of their enclosure. No vertical displacement was observed. Interspecific Interactions were common (>2.5/hr), and equally divided among mildly Aggressive, neutral, and affiliative Interactions such as play. Only one Aggressive Interaction involved physical contact and was non-injurious. Aggressive Interactions were mostly (65%) displacements and vocal exchanges, initiated almost equally by Cebus and Saimiri. Modifications to the enclosure were successful in reducing these mildly Aggressive Interactions with affiliative Interactions increasing in frequency and diversity. Our data suggest that in carefully designed, large enclosures, naturally associating monkeys are able to live harmoniously and are enriched by each other.

Nahoko Tokuyama – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • inter group Aggressive Interaction patterns indicate male mate defense and female cooperation across bonobo groups at wamba democratic republic of the congo
    American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 2019
    Co-Authors: Nahoko Tokuyama, Tetsuya Sakamaki, Takeshi Furuichi
    Abstract:

    OBJECTIVES Although conflicts between groups over valuable resources are common in the animal kingdom, an individual’s strategy toward out-group individuals may differ according to the benefits and costs received from inter-group Interactions. Groups of bonobos encounter each other frequently and may mingle and range together from a few hours to a few days. During these inter-group associations, individuals across groups exhibit both Aggressive and affiliative Interactions. This study aimed to examine the strategies that bonobos employ with other groups, by comparing the patterns of within- and inter-group aggression. MATERIALS AND METHODS We observed the Aggressive Interactions within a group of wild bonobos and between the group and three neighboring groups in Wamba, Luo Scientific Reserve, DR Congo. RESULTS Bonobos increased the level of cooperation to attack out-group individuals more than they do to attack within-group individuals. Additionally, they reduced the aggression between within-group members during inter-group associations, compared to that when not associated with other groups. Males selectively and cooperatively attacked out-group males. Inter-group aggression among females was rare. Furthermore, females sometimes formed coalitions with out-group individuals to attack a common target. DISCUSSION Our results support the hypothesis that inter-group competition occurs in bonobos, with males across groups competing over mates. Females across groups were tolerant and even cooperative with each other. Regardless of the ideal male strategy, female tolerant and cooperative relationships across groups and female within-group superiority over males could preserve tolerant inter-group relationships in bonobos.

  • Inter‐group Aggressive Interaction patterns indicate male mate defense and female cooperation across bonobo groups at Wamba, Democratic Republic of the Congo
    American journal of physical anthropology, 2019
    Co-Authors: Nahoko Tokuyama, Tetsuya Sakamaki, Takeshi Furuichi
    Abstract:

    OBJECTIVES Although conflicts between groups over valuable resources are common in the animal kingdom, an individual’s strategy toward out-group individuals may differ according to the benefits and costs received from inter-group Interactions. Groups of bonobos encounter each other frequently and may mingle and range together from a few hours to a few days. During these inter-group associations, individuals across groups exhibit both Aggressive and affiliative Interactions. This study aimed to examine the strategies that bonobos employ with other groups, by comparing the patterns of within- and inter-group aggression. MATERIALS AND METHODS We observed the Aggressive Interactions within a group of wild bonobos and between the group and three neighboring groups in Wamba, Luo Scientific Reserve, DR Congo. RESULTS Bonobos increased the level of cooperation to attack out-group individuals more than they do to attack within-group individuals. Additionally, they reduced the aggression between within-group members during inter-group associations, compared to that when not associated with other groups. Males selectively and cooperatively attacked out-group males. Inter-group aggression among females was rare. Furthermore, females sometimes formed coalitions with out-group individuals to attack a common target. DISCUSSION Our results support the hypothesis that inter-group competition occurs in bonobos, with males across groups competing over mates. Females across groups were tolerant and even cooperative with each other. Regardless of the ideal male strategy, female tolerant and cooperative relationships across groups and female within-group superiority over males could preserve tolerant inter-group relationships in bonobos.

Takeshi Furuichi – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • inter group Aggressive Interaction patterns indicate male mate defense and female cooperation across bonobo groups at wamba democratic republic of the congo
    American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 2019
    Co-Authors: Nahoko Tokuyama, Tetsuya Sakamaki, Takeshi Furuichi
    Abstract:

    OBJECTIVES Although conflicts between groups over valuable resources are common in the animal kingdom, an individual’s strategy toward out-group individuals may differ according to the benefits and costs received from inter-group Interactions. Groups of bonobos encounter each other frequently and may mingle and range together from a few hours to a few days. During these inter-group associations, individuals across groups exhibit both Aggressive and affiliative Interactions. This study aimed to examine the strategies that bonobos employ with other groups, by comparing the patterns of within- and inter-group aggression. MATERIALS AND METHODS We observed the Aggressive Interactions within a group of wild bonobos and between the group and three neighboring groups in Wamba, Luo Scientific Reserve, DR Congo. RESULTS Bonobos increased the level of cooperation to attack out-group individuals more than they do to attack within-group individuals. Additionally, they reduced the aggression between within-group members during inter-group associations, compared to that when not associated with other groups. Males selectively and cooperatively attacked out-group males. Inter-group aggression among females was rare. Furthermore, females sometimes formed coalitions with out-group individuals to attack a common target. DISCUSSION Our results support the hypothesis that inter-group competition occurs in bonobos, with males across groups competing over mates. Females across groups were tolerant and even cooperative with each other. Regardless of the ideal male strategy, female tolerant and cooperative relationships across groups and female within-group superiority over males could preserve tolerant inter-group relationships in bonobos.

  • Inter‐group Aggressive Interaction patterns indicate male mate defense and female cooperation across bonobo groups at Wamba, Democratic Republic of the Congo
    American journal of physical anthropology, 2019
    Co-Authors: Nahoko Tokuyama, Tetsuya Sakamaki, Takeshi Furuichi
    Abstract:

    OBJECTIVES Although conflicts between groups over valuable resources are common in the animal kingdom, an individual’s strategy toward out-group individuals may differ according to the benefits and costs received from inter-group Interactions. Groups of bonobos encounter each other frequently and may mingle and range together from a few hours to a few days. During these inter-group associations, individuals across groups exhibit both Aggressive and affiliative Interactions. This study aimed to examine the strategies that bonobos employ with other groups, by comparing the patterns of within- and inter-group aggression. MATERIALS AND METHODS We observed the Aggressive Interactions within a group of wild bonobos and between the group and three neighboring groups in Wamba, Luo Scientific Reserve, DR Congo. RESULTS Bonobos increased the level of cooperation to attack out-group individuals more than they do to attack within-group individuals. Additionally, they reduced the aggression between within-group members during inter-group associations, compared to that when not associated with other groups. Males selectively and cooperatively attacked out-group males. Inter-group aggression among females was rare. Furthermore, females sometimes formed coalitions with out-group individuals to attack a common target. DISCUSSION Our results support the hypothesis that inter-group competition occurs in bonobos, with males across groups competing over mates. Females across groups were tolerant and even cooperative with each other. Regardless of the ideal male strategy, female tolerant and cooperative relationships across groups and female within-group superiority over males could preserve tolerant inter-group relationships in bonobos.

Charlotte Macdonald – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • living together behavior and welfare in single and mixed species groups of capuchin cebus apella and squirrel monkeys saimiri sciureus
    American Journal of Primatology, 2010
    Co-Authors: Rebecca Leonardi, Hannah M Buchanansmith, Vala Rie Dufour, Charlotte Macdonald, Andrew Whiten
    Abstract:

    There are potential advantages of housing primates in mixed species exhibits for both the visiting public and the primates themselves. If the primates naturally associate in the wild, it may be more educational and enjoyable for the public to view. Increases in social complexity and stimulation may be enriching for the primates. However, mixed species exhibits might also create welfare problems such as stress from interspecific aggression. We present data on the behavior of single and mixed species groups of capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella) and squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) housed at the Living Links to Human Evolution Research Centre in the Royal Zoological Society of Scotland’s Edinburgh Zoo. These species associate in the wild, gaining foraging benefits and decreased predation. But Cebus are also predators themselves with potential risks for the smaller Saimiri. To study their living together we took scan samples at ≥15 min intervals on single (n=109) and mixed species groups (n=152), and all occurrences of intraspecific aggression and interspecific Interactions were recorded. We found no evidence of chronic stress and Saimiri actively chose to associate with Cebus. On 79% of scans, the two species simultaneously occupied the same part of their enclosure. No vertical displacement was observed. Interspecific Interactions were common (>2.5/hr), and equally divided among mildly Aggressive, neutral, and affiliative Interactions such as play. Only one Aggressive Interaction involved physical contact and was non-injurious. Aggressive Interactions were mostly (65%) displacements and vocal exchanges, initiated almost equally by Cebus and Saimiri. Modifications to the enclosure were successful in reducing these mildly Aggressive Interactions with affiliative Interactions increasing in frequency and diversity. Our data suggest that in carefully designed, large enclosures, naturally associating monkeys are able to live harmoniously and are enriched by each other. Am. J. Primatol. 72:33–47, 2010. © 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  • living together behavior and welfare in single and mixed species groups of capuchin cebus apella and squirrel monkeys saimiri sciureus
    American Journal of Primatology, 2010
    Co-Authors: Rebecca Leonardi, Hannah M Buchanansmith, Vala Rie Dufour, Charlotte Macdonald, Andrew Whiten
    Abstract:

    There are potential advantages of housing primates in mixed species exhibits for both the visiting public and the primates themselves. If the primates naturally associate in the wild, it may be more educational and enjoyable for the public to view. Increases in social complexity and stimulation may be enriching for the primates. However, mixed species exhibits might also create welfare problems such as stress from interspecific aggression. We present data on the behavior of single and mixed species groups of capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella) and squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) housed at the Living Links to Human Evolution Research Centre in the Royal Zoological Society of Scotland’s Edinburgh Zoo. These species associate in the wild, gaining foraging benefits and decreased predation. But Cebus are also predators themselves with potential risks for the smaller Saimiri. To study their living together we took scan samples at > or =15 min intervals on single (n=109) and mixed species groups (n=152), and all occurrences of intraspecific aggression and interspecific Interactions were recorded. We found no evidence of chronic stress and Saimiri actively chose to associate with Cebus. On 79% of scans, the two species simultaneously occupied the same part of their enclosure. No vertical displacement was observed. Interspecific Interactions were common (>2.5/hr), and equally divided among mildly Aggressive, neutral, and affiliative Interactions such as play. Only one Aggressive Interaction involved physical contact and was non-injurious. Aggressive Interactions were mostly (65%) displacements and vocal exchanges, initiated almost equally by Cebus and Saimiri. Modifications to the enclosure were successful in reducing these mildly Aggressive Interactions with affiliative Interactions increasing in frequency and diversity. Our data suggest that in carefully designed, large enclosures, naturally associating monkeys are able to live harmoniously and are enriched by each other.