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Yinguang Shi – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • effects of land use on soil moisture variations in a semi arid catchment implications for land and Agricultural Water Management
    Land Degradation & Development, 2014
    Co-Authors: Xiaodong Gao, Xining Zhao, Juan Wang, Yinguang Shi
    Abstract:

    Knowledge of the effects of land use on soil moisture variations is necessary to improve land and Agricultural Water Management in the semi-arid Chinese Loess Plateau. However, previous studies are insufficient to guide Management practice in this area and improvement is needed to help with the development of the ‘Grain for Green’ programme. As part of the ‘Grain for Green’ programme, we examined the effects of five land uses (fallow, grassland, cropland, 3-year and 8-year jujube orchards) on soil Water variations in a small catchment on the Loess Plateau. Soil moisture at 0–160 cm depth was monitored approximately weekly at 47 sites from 17 August to 19 October 2009 and from 4 April to 27 September 2010 using a portable time domain reflectometer. Results indicated that mean soil Water profiles in different land uses varied with time, land use induced spatial variations of soil Water but exerted negligible influence on soil Water temporal patterns, and soil Water content was of the greatest spatial variability with moderate means (approximately 20 per cent). Furthermore, the relationship between standard deviation and mean Water content was dependent on soil depth, although it was negligibly affected by land use. Profile soil Water for five land uses was different in various seasons, precipitation infiltration depth exhibited a positive correlation with precipitation, and the whole profile soil moisture (0–160 cm) was complemented following a 93·5-mm rainfall event. The findings presented here provide helpful information for land and Agricultural Water Management in this area. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • EFFECTS OF LAND USE ON SOIL MOISTURE VARIATIONS IN A SEMI‐ARID CATCHMENT: IMPLICATIONS FOR LAND AND Agricultural Water Management
    Land Degradation & Development, 2011
    Co-Authors: Xiaodong Gao, Xining Zhao, Juan Wang, Yinguang Shi
    Abstract:

    Knowledge of the effects of land use on soil moisture variations is necessary to improve land and Agricultural Water Management in the semi-arid Chinese Loess Plateau. However, previous studies are insufficient to guide Management practice in this area and improvement is needed to help with the development of the ‘Grain for Green’ programme. As part of the ‘Grain for Green’ programme, we examined the effects of five land uses (fallow, grassland, cropland, 3-year and 8-year jujube orchards) on soil Water variations in a small catchment on the Loess Plateau. Soil moisture at 0–160 cm depth was monitored approximately weekly at 47 sites from 17 August to 19 October 2009 and from 4 April to 27 September 2010 using a portable time domain reflectometer. Results indicated that mean soil Water profiles in different land uses varied with time, land use induced spatial variations of soil Water but exerted negligible influence on soil Water temporal patterns, and soil Water content was of the greatest spatial variability with moderate means (approximately 20 per cent). Furthermore, the relationship between standard deviation and mean Water content was dependent on soil depth, although it was negligibly affected by land use. Profile soil Water for five land uses was different in various seasons, precipitation infiltration depth exhibited a positive correlation with precipitation, and the whole profile soil moisture (0–160 cm) was complemented following a 93·5-mm rainfall event. The findings presented here provide helpful information for land and Agricultural Water Management in this area. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Xiaodong Gao – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • effects of land use on soil moisture variations in a semi arid catchment implications for land and Agricultural Water Management
    Land Degradation & Development, 2014
    Co-Authors: Xiaodong Gao, Xining Zhao, Juan Wang, Yinguang Shi
    Abstract:

    Knowledge of the effects of land use on soil moisture variations is necessary to improve land and Agricultural Water Management in the semi-arid Chinese Loess Plateau. However, previous studies are insufficient to guide Management practice in this area and improvement is needed to help with the development of the ‘Grain for Green’ programme. As part of the ‘Grain for Green’ programme, we examined the effects of five land uses (fallow, grassland, cropland, 3-year and 8-year jujube orchards) on soil Water variations in a small catchment on the Loess Plateau. Soil moisture at 0–160 cm depth was monitored approximately weekly at 47 sites from 17 August to 19 October 2009 and from 4 April to 27 September 2010 using a portable time domain reflectometer. Results indicated that mean soil Water profiles in different land uses varied with time, land use induced spatial variations of soil Water but exerted negligible influence on soil Water temporal patterns, and soil Water content was of the greatest spatial variability with moderate means (approximately 20 per cent). Furthermore, the relationship between standard deviation and mean Water content was dependent on soil depth, although it was negligibly affected by land use. Profile soil Water for five land uses was different in various seasons, precipitation infiltration depth exhibited a positive correlation with precipitation, and the whole profile soil moisture (0–160 cm) was complemented following a 93·5-mm rainfall event. The findings presented here provide helpful information for land and Agricultural Water Management in this area. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • EFFECTS OF LAND USE ON SOIL MOISTURE VARIATIONS IN A SEMI‐ARID CATCHMENT: IMPLICATIONS FOR LAND AND Agricultural Water Management
    Land Degradation & Development, 2011
    Co-Authors: Xiaodong Gao, Xining Zhao, Juan Wang, Yinguang Shi
    Abstract:

    Knowledge of the effects of land use on soil moisture variations is necessary to improve land and Agricultural Water Management in the semi-arid Chinese Loess Plateau. However, previous studies are insufficient to guide Management practice in this area and improvement is needed to help with the development of the ‘Grain for Green’ programme. As part of the ‘Grain for Green’ programme, we examined the effects of five land uses (fallow, grassland, cropland, 3-year and 8-year jujube orchards) on soil Water variations in a small catchment on the Loess Plateau. Soil moisture at 0–160 cm depth was monitored approximately weekly at 47 sites from 17 August to 19 October 2009 and from 4 April to 27 September 2010 using a portable time domain reflectometer. Results indicated that mean soil Water profiles in different land uses varied with time, land use induced spatial variations of soil Water but exerted negligible influence on soil Water temporal patterns, and soil Water content was of the greatest spatial variability with moderate means (approximately 20 per cent). Furthermore, the relationship between standard deviation and mean Water content was dependent on soil depth, although it was negligibly affected by land use. Profile soil Water for five land uses was different in various seasons, precipitation infiltration depth exhibited a positive correlation with precipitation, and the whole profile soil moisture (0–160 cm) was complemented following a 93·5-mm rainfall event. The findings presented here provide helpful information for land and Agricultural Water Management in this area. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Juan Wang – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • effects of land use on soil moisture variations in a semi arid catchment implications for land and Agricultural Water Management
    Land Degradation & Development, 2014
    Co-Authors: Xiaodong Gao, Xining Zhao, Juan Wang, Yinguang Shi
    Abstract:

    Knowledge of the effects of land use on soil moisture variations is necessary to improve land and Agricultural Water Management in the semi-arid Chinese Loess Plateau. However, previous studies are insufficient to guide Management practice in this area and improvement is needed to help with the development of the ‘Grain for Green’ programme. As part of the ‘Grain for Green’ programme, we examined the effects of five land uses (fallow, grassland, cropland, 3-year and 8-year jujube orchards) on soil Water variations in a small catchment on the Loess Plateau. Soil moisture at 0–160 cm depth was monitored approximately weekly at 47 sites from 17 August to 19 October 2009 and from 4 April to 27 September 2010 using a portable time domain reflectometer. Results indicated that mean soil Water profiles in different land uses varied with time, land use induced spatial variations of soil Water but exerted negligible influence on soil Water temporal patterns, and soil Water content was of the greatest spatial variability with moderate means (approximately 20 per cent). Furthermore, the relationship between standard deviation and mean Water content was dependent on soil depth, although it was negligibly affected by land use. Profile soil Water for five land uses was different in various seasons, precipitation infiltration depth exhibited a positive correlation with precipitation, and the whole profile soil moisture (0–160 cm) was complemented following a 93·5-mm rainfall event. The findings presented here provide helpful information for land and Agricultural Water Management in this area. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • EFFECTS OF LAND USE ON SOIL MOISTURE VARIATIONS IN A SEMI‐ARID CATCHMENT: IMPLICATIONS FOR LAND AND Agricultural Water Management
    Land Degradation & Development, 2011
    Co-Authors: Xiaodong Gao, Xining Zhao, Juan Wang, Yinguang Shi
    Abstract:

    Knowledge of the effects of land use on soil moisture variations is necessary to improve land and Agricultural Water Management in the semi-arid Chinese Loess Plateau. However, previous studies are insufficient to guide Management practice in this area and improvement is needed to help with the development of the ‘Grain for Green’ programme. As part of the ‘Grain for Green’ programme, we examined the effects of five land uses (fallow, grassland, cropland, 3-year and 8-year jujube orchards) on soil Water variations in a small catchment on the Loess Plateau. Soil moisture at 0–160 cm depth was monitored approximately weekly at 47 sites from 17 August to 19 October 2009 and from 4 April to 27 September 2010 using a portable time domain reflectometer. Results indicated that mean soil Water profiles in different land uses varied with time, land use induced spatial variations of soil Water but exerted negligible influence on soil Water temporal patterns, and soil Water content was of the greatest spatial variability with moderate means (approximately 20 per cent). Furthermore, the relationship between standard deviation and mean Water content was dependent on soil depth, although it was negligibly affected by land use. Profile soil Water for five land uses was different in various seasons, precipitation infiltration depth exhibited a positive correlation with precipitation, and the whole profile soil moisture (0–160 cm) was complemented following a 93·5-mm rainfall event. The findings presented here provide helpful information for land and Agricultural Water Management in this area. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Xining Zhao – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • effects of land use on soil moisture variations in a semi arid catchment implications for land and Agricultural Water Management
    Land Degradation & Development, 2014
    Co-Authors: Xiaodong Gao, Xining Zhao, Juan Wang, Yinguang Shi
    Abstract:

    Knowledge of the effects of land use on soil moisture variations is necessary to improve land and Agricultural Water Management in the semi-arid Chinese Loess Plateau. However, previous studies are insufficient to guide Management practice in this area and improvement is needed to help with the development of the ‘Grain for Green’ programme. As part of the ‘Grain for Green’ programme, we examined the effects of five land uses (fallow, grassland, cropland, 3-year and 8-year jujube orchards) on soil Water variations in a small catchment on the Loess Plateau. Soil moisture at 0–160 cm depth was monitored approximately weekly at 47 sites from 17 August to 19 October 2009 and from 4 April to 27 September 2010 using a portable time domain reflectometer. Results indicated that mean soil Water profiles in different land uses varied with time, land use induced spatial variations of soil Water but exerted negligible influence on soil Water temporal patterns, and soil Water content was of the greatest spatial variability with moderate means (approximately 20 per cent). Furthermore, the relationship between standard deviation and mean Water content was dependent on soil depth, although it was negligibly affected by land use. Profile soil Water for five land uses was different in various seasons, precipitation infiltration depth exhibited a positive correlation with precipitation, and the whole profile soil moisture (0–160 cm) was complemented following a 93·5-mm rainfall event. The findings presented here provide helpful information for land and Agricultural Water Management in this area. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • EFFECTS OF LAND USE ON SOIL MOISTURE VARIATIONS IN A SEMI‐ARID CATCHMENT: IMPLICATIONS FOR LAND AND Agricultural Water Management
    Land Degradation & Development, 2011
    Co-Authors: Xiaodong Gao, Xining Zhao, Juan Wang, Yinguang Shi
    Abstract:

    Knowledge of the effects of land use on soil moisture variations is necessary to improve land and Agricultural Water Management in the semi-arid Chinese Loess Plateau. However, previous studies are insufficient to guide Management practice in this area and improvement is needed to help with the development of the ‘Grain for Green’ programme. As part of the ‘Grain for Green’ programme, we examined the effects of five land uses (fallow, grassland, cropland, 3-year and 8-year jujube orchards) on soil Water variations in a small catchment on the Loess Plateau. Soil moisture at 0–160 cm depth was monitored approximately weekly at 47 sites from 17 August to 19 October 2009 and from 4 April to 27 September 2010 using a portable time domain reflectometer. Results indicated that mean soil Water profiles in different land uses varied with time, land use induced spatial variations of soil Water but exerted negligible influence on soil Water temporal patterns, and soil Water content was of the greatest spatial variability with moderate means (approximately 20 per cent). Furthermore, the relationship between standard deviation and mean Water content was dependent on soil depth, although it was negligibly affected by land use. Profile soil Water for five land uses was different in various seasons, precipitation infiltration depth exhibited a positive correlation with precipitation, and the whole profile soil moisture (0–160 cm) was complemented following a 93·5-mm rainfall event. The findings presented here provide helpful information for land and Agricultural Water Management in this area. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Jennie Barron – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Effectiveness of Agricultural Water Management technologies on rainfed cereals crop yield and runoff in semi-arid catchment: a meta-analysis
    International Journal of Agricultural Sustainability, 2018
    Co-Authors: Manuel Magombeyi, Akpofure E. Taigbenu, Jennie Barron
    Abstract:

    Multiple Agricultural Water Management (AWM) technologies are being promoted worldwide in rainfed agro-ecological production systems, such as the Limpopo River Basin, to close the yield gap, enhanc…

  • Mapping the potential success of Agricultural Water Management interventions for smallholders: Where are the best opportunities?
    Water Resources and Rural Development, 2015
    Co-Authors: Jennie Barron, Eric Kemp-benedict, J. Morris, A. De Bruin, G. Wang, Amanda Fencl
    Abstract:

    From field to basin scales, there are many appropriate interventions used to manage rainfall efficiently and productively in smallholder farming systems. Yet, successful targeting and scaling-out of these approaches remains a challenge. This paper presents an innovative approach in decision support called ‘Targeting Agricultural Water Management Interventions’ (TAGMI) with application in Limpopo and Volta river basins (available at http://www.seimapping.org/tagmi/). The online open-access TAGMI uses country-scale Bayesian network models to assess the likelihood of success for outscaling various Agricultural Water Management (AWM) interventions at sub-national level. The web tool integrates multiple sources of expertise on the enabling environment for outscaling based on key social, human, physical, financial, and natural factors. It estimates the relative probability of success of an AWM intervention across the Limpopo and Volta river basins. Here we present TAGMI as a ‘proof of concept’, areas of high, medium, and low probabilities of success for three AWM technologies common in Limpopo and Volta River Basins: the soil Water conservation/in situ rainWater harvesting technologies in rain-fed systems, small-scale private irrigation and small reservoirs used for communal irrigation purposes. We then apply a climate change scenario and discuss the robustness in potential AWM, according to the TAGMI tool. Finally, we discuss the need for generic or specific information on ‘best practices of implementation’ for successful uptake of technologies in poverty-constrained smallholder farming systems.

  • Setting up Agricultural Water Management interventions – learning from successful case studies in the Volta and Limpopo river basins
    Water Resources and Rural Development, 2015
    Co-Authors: Annemarieke De Bruin, Jennie Barron, Rachel M. Pateman, Mariam Balima, Issa Ouedraogo, Evariste Constant Da Dapola, Mathias Fosu, F. O. Annor, M. S. Magombeyi, Jean-marie Kileshye Onema
    Abstract:

    Abstract Long-term investments in Agricultural Water Management (AWM) interventions in the Volta and Limpopo river basins have aimed at improving Water availability and quality for smallholder farming systems. However, sustained and wider uptake of AWM technologies and approaches has not been as successful. We need to learn from successful AWM interventions, those interventions that have led to a sustained or increased uptake of AWM technologies or approaches, and which have led to improved well-being of farmers and livestock keepers in the rural development context of sub-Sahara Africa. This paper explores AWM interventions, specifically, the impacts these interventions have had and the factors contributing to the success of these interventions. In four countries within the Volta and Limpopo river basins, consultations were carried in 33 case studies of successful AWM interventions with implementing organisations and beneficiaries using a participatory GIS methodology. A systematic text analysis of 55 case study reports showed that these 33 interventions have had a positive impact on the well-being of beneficiaries and there was a sustained and wider uptake of the AWM technologies or approaches introduced. A clear demand for the technology, appropriate design of the technology, input support, training and capacity building, and a sense of ownership of the community helped to sustain the uptake of AWM technologies and approaches. We conclude that implementing organisations would benefit from investing in the soft components of an AWM intervention, as this will increase the likelihood of successful adoption and adaptation of the AWM technologies and approaches in the long-term.