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Armando Meyer – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • revisiting cancer 15 years later exploring mortality among Agricultural and non Agricultural Workers in the serrana region of rio de janeiro
    American Journal of Industrial Medicine, 2017
    Co-Authors: Noa Krawczyk, Aline De Souza Espindola Santos, Jaime Silva De Lima, Armando Meyer
    Abstract:

    Background Agricultural production has expanded dramatically throughout Brazil. Previous research in the Serrana Region found that from 1979 to 1998, Agricultural Workers experienced high mortality rates from certain cancers compared to non-Agricultural Workers [Meyer et al. (2003): Environ Res 93:264–271]. Methods New data were obtained for 1999–2013 and Mortality Odds Ratios (MORs) were utilized to compare cancer and other mortality between male Agricultural Workers in the Serrana Region and non-Agricultural Workers in the Serrana Region, Rio de Janeiro, and Porto Alegre, and to compare mortality odds to previous decades. Results Respectively, compared to aforementioned reference-groups, Agricultural Workers experienced highest MORs for stomach (1.55 [95%CI: 1.13–2.12], 2.30 [95%CI: 1.72–3.08], 2.28 [95%CI: 1.69–3.08]) and esophageal cancers (95%CI: 1.93 [1.38–2.7], 1.93 [95%CI: 1.38–2.71], 3.12 [95%CI: 2.30–4.24]), greater than reported in previous decades. Agricultural Workers experienced higher mortality for external-causes, respiratory, and cardiovascular problems compared to urban reference-groups. Conclusion Agricultural Workers may be at increasing risk for cancer and other mortality. Efforts are needed to investigate distinct risk-factors among this group. Am. J. Ind. Med. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  • mood disorders hospitalizations suicide attempts and suicide mortality among Agricultural Workers and residents in an area with intensive use of pesticides in brazil
    Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health, 2010
    Co-Authors: Armando Meyer, Sergio Koifman, Juliana De Rezende Chrisman, Josino Costa Moreira, Rosalina Jorge Koifman, Yael Abreuvillaca
    Abstract:

    As suicide rates have increased in rural areas in Brazil, it was postulated that pesticide exposure may play a role in this phenomenon. Our study compared the suicide mortality rates observed among Agricultural Workers from a pesticide-intensive area in Brazil to the suicide mortality frequency noted in three reference populations. In addition, hospitalization rates attributed to suicide attempts and mood disorders including depression in residents of the same Agricultural area were compared to two reference populations. Finally, data on pesticide sales per Agricultural worker were obtained for each city of Rio de Janeiro State and suicide mortality risk was then calculated according to the quartiles of pesticide sales per Agricultural Workers, using the first quartile as reference. Agricultural Workers were at greater risk for lethality due to suicide when compared to all three reference populations. In addition, residents of the same study area showed higher hospitalization rates by suicide attempts and mood disorders than observed in comparison populations. Results also showed that the risk of death by suicide was significantly higher among Agricultural Workers who lived in areas of Rio de Janeiro State displaying higher rates of pesticide expenditure per Agricultural worker. These results suggest that pesticide exposure may indeed increase the risk of suicide frequency, especially among Agricultural Workers.

  • cancer mortality among Agricultural Workers from serrana region state of rio de janeiro brazil
    Environmental Research, 2003
    Co-Authors: Armando Meyer, Juliana De Rezende Chrisman, Josino Costa Moreira, Sergio Koifman
    Abstract:

    One of the proposed hypotheses to explain the higher incidence of specific-site cancers among Agricultural Workers is their higher exposure to pesticides. The role of pesticide exposure in morbidity and mortality profiles in Brazil is not well known. Therefore, in order to contribute to increase knowledge on this subject, an ecological analysis aiming to investigate cancer mortality among Agricultural Workers in an important Agricultural area of the Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil, was performed. All causes of death for male Workers 30-69 years old provided by the National Mortality Information System between 1979 and 1998 were evaluated. To estimate cancer mortality risks of selected sites, mortality odds ratio (MOR) was employed, and three reference populations were used. Higher mortality of esophagus, stomach, and larynx cancer in Agricultural Workers 50-69 years old was observed in the period from 1979 to 1988 and of esophagus and stomach cancer from 1989 to 1998. Agricultural Workers 30-49 years old showed higher, but not statistically significant, mortality by stomach, esophagus, liver, testis, and prostate cancer, and soft-tissue sarcoma in the period of 1979-1988, and by testis and penis cancer, leukemia, and soft-tissue sarcoma in the period of 1989-1998. Despite the limitations of ecological approaches concerning causality ascertainment, we believe that this study raises questions of the possible role of pesticide exposure on the cancer mortality profile among Brazilian Agricultural Workers.

Sergio Koifman – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • mood disorders hospitalizations suicide attempts and suicide mortality among Agricultural Workers and residents in an area with intensive use of pesticides in brazil
    Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health, 2010
    Co-Authors: Armando Meyer, Sergio Koifman, Juliana De Rezende Chrisman, Josino Costa Moreira, Rosalina Jorge Koifman, Yael Abreuvillaca
    Abstract:

    As suicide rates have increased in rural areas in Brazil, it was postulated that pesticide exposure may play a role in this phenomenon. Our study compared the suicide mortality rates observed among Agricultural Workers from a pesticide-intensive area in Brazil to the suicide mortality frequency noted in three reference populations. In addition, hospitalization rates attributed to suicide attempts and mood disorders including depression in residents of the same Agricultural area were compared to two reference populations. Finally, data on pesticide sales per Agricultural worker were obtained for each city of Rio de Janeiro State and suicide mortality risk was then calculated according to the quartiles of pesticide sales per Agricultural Workers, using the first quartile as reference. Agricultural Workers were at greater risk for lethality due to suicide when compared to all three reference populations. In addition, residents of the same study area showed higher hospitalization rates by suicide attempts and mood disorders than observed in comparison populations. Results also showed that the risk of death by suicide was significantly higher among Agricultural Workers who lived in areas of Rio de Janeiro State displaying higher rates of pesticide expenditure per Agricultural worker. These results suggest that pesticide exposure may indeed increase the risk of suicide frequency, especially among Agricultural Workers.

  • cancer mortality among Agricultural Workers from serrana region state of rio de janeiro brazil
    Environmental Research, 2003
    Co-Authors: Armando Meyer, Juliana De Rezende Chrisman, Josino Costa Moreira, Sergio Koifman
    Abstract:

    One of the proposed hypotheses to explain the higher incidence of specific-site cancers among Agricultural Workers is their higher exposure to pesticides. The role of pesticide exposure in morbidity and mortality profiles in Brazil is not well known. Therefore, in order to contribute to increase knowledge on this subject, an ecological analysis aiming to investigate cancer mortality among Agricultural Workers in an important Agricultural area of the Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil, was performed. All causes of death for male Workers 30-69 years old provided by the National Mortality Information System between 1979 and 1998 were evaluated. To estimate cancer mortality risks of selected sites, mortality odds ratio (MOR) was employed, and three reference populations were used. Higher mortality of esophagus, stomach, and larynx cancer in Agricultural Workers 50-69 years old was observed in the period from 1979 to 1988 and of esophagus and stomach cancer from 1989 to 1998. Agricultural Workers 30-49 years old showed higher, but not statistically significant, mortality by stomach, esophagus, liver, testis, and prostate cancer, and soft-tissue sarcoma in the period of 1979-1988, and by testis and penis cancer, leukemia, and soft-tissue sarcoma in the period of 1989-1998. Despite the limitations of ecological approaches concerning causality ascertainment, we believe that this study raises questions of the possible role of pesticide exposure on the cancer mortality profile among Brazilian Agricultural Workers.

Gregory C. Murphy – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Agricultural Workers‘ return to work following spinal cord injury: a comparison with other industry Workers.
    Disability and rehabilitation, 2004
    Co-Authors: Amanda E. Young, Roger Strasser, Gregory C. Murphy
    Abstract:

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of spinal cord injury on employment outcomes as experienced by Agricultural Workers in comparison with persons employed in other industries. Because of the challenges associated with working in many of the Agricultural industries, it was anticipated that Agricultural Workers would achieve inferior return-to-work outcomes.Method: Survey of all employed persons who experienced a traumatic spinal cord injury in southeastern Australia between 1990 and 1996 (inclusive).Results: Contrary to expectation, Agricultural Workers had a significantly higher rate of return to work (61.7% vs. 41.1%). However, an investigation into the hours spent working and Agricultural Workers‘ satisfaction with their employment activities, indicated that most were underemployed and had the potential to achieve even better outcomes.Conclusion: Results indicate that more can be done to help injured Agricultural Workers achieve their employment potential.

  • Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Outcomes A comparison of Agricultural and non-Agricultural Workers
    The Australian journal of rural health, 1998
    Co-Authors: Amanda E. Young, Gregory C. Murphy
    Abstract:

    This study of Victorian Workers who sustained a spinal cord injury aimed to: (i) define the proportion of this population who were employed in an Agricultural setting prior to sustaining their injury; (ii) explore the preinjury characteristics and postinjury vocational achievements of Agricultural Workers; and (iii) compare these with those of non-Agricultural Workers. Respondents were sampled from patients presenting for review at the participating spinal unit over the 9 months study period (N = 150 with a participation rate of 71%). Results indicated that while those working in Agricultural occupations account for between 4 and 4.5% of Victorian Workers, 13.3% of respondents reported working in Agricultural occupations at the time of their injury. In spite of the physically demanding nature of their workplace many Agricultural Workers returned to farming postinjury. The rehabilitation experiences and return to work outcomes achieved by the Agricultural Workers were found to be very similar to those of other Workers, despite the additional barriers they were expected to have encountered. Language: en

Josino Costa Moreira – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • mood disorders hospitalizations suicide attempts and suicide mortality among Agricultural Workers and residents in an area with intensive use of pesticides in brazil
    Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health, 2010
    Co-Authors: Armando Meyer, Sergio Koifman, Juliana De Rezende Chrisman, Josino Costa Moreira, Rosalina Jorge Koifman, Yael Abreuvillaca
    Abstract:

    As suicide rates have increased in rural areas in Brazil, it was postulated that pesticide exposure may play a role in this phenomenon. Our study compared the suicide mortality rates observed among Agricultural Workers from a pesticide-intensive area in Brazil to the suicide mortality frequency noted in three reference populations. In addition, hospitalization rates attributed to suicide attempts and mood disorders including depression in residents of the same Agricultural area were compared to two reference populations. Finally, data on pesticide sales per Agricultural worker were obtained for each city of Rio de Janeiro State and suicide mortality risk was then calculated according to the quartiles of pesticide sales per Agricultural Workers, using the first quartile as reference. Agricultural Workers were at greater risk for lethality due to suicide when compared to all three reference populations. In addition, residents of the same study area showed higher hospitalization rates by suicide attempts and mood disorders than observed in comparison populations. Results also showed that the risk of death by suicide was significantly higher among Agricultural Workers who lived in areas of Rio de Janeiro State displaying higher rates of pesticide expenditure per Agricultural worker. These results suggest that pesticide exposure may indeed increase the risk of suicide frequency, especially among Agricultural Workers.

  • cancer mortality among Agricultural Workers from serrana region state of rio de janeiro brazil
    Environmental Research, 2003
    Co-Authors: Armando Meyer, Juliana De Rezende Chrisman, Josino Costa Moreira, Sergio Koifman
    Abstract:

    One of the proposed hypotheses to explain the higher incidence of specific-site cancers among Agricultural Workers is their higher exposure to pesticides. The role of pesticide exposure in morbidity and mortality profiles in Brazil is not well known. Therefore, in order to contribute to increase knowledge on this subject, an ecological analysis aiming to investigate cancer mortality among Agricultural Workers in an important Agricultural area of the Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil, was performed. All causes of death for male Workers 30-69 years old provided by the National Mortality Information System between 1979 and 1998 were evaluated. To estimate cancer mortality risks of selected sites, mortality odds ratio (MOR) was employed, and three reference populations were used. Higher mortality of esophagus, stomach, and larynx cancer in Agricultural Workers 50-69 years old was observed in the period from 1979 to 1988 and of esophagus and stomach cancer from 1989 to 1998. Agricultural Workers 30-49 years old showed higher, but not statistically significant, mortality by stomach, esophagus, liver, testis, and prostate cancer, and soft-tissue sarcoma in the period of 1979-1988, and by testis and penis cancer, leukemia, and soft-tissue sarcoma in the period of 1989-1998. Despite the limitations of ecological approaches concerning causality ascertainment, we believe that this study raises questions of the possible role of pesticide exposure on the cancer mortality profile among Brazilian Agricultural Workers.

Juliana De Rezende Chrisman – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • mood disorders hospitalizations suicide attempts and suicide mortality among Agricultural Workers and residents in an area with intensive use of pesticides in brazil
    Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health, 2010
    Co-Authors: Armando Meyer, Sergio Koifman, Juliana De Rezende Chrisman, Josino Costa Moreira, Rosalina Jorge Koifman, Yael Abreuvillaca
    Abstract:

    As suicide rates have increased in rural areas in Brazil, it was postulated that pesticide exposure may play a role in this phenomenon. Our study compared the suicide mortality rates observed among Agricultural Workers from a pesticide-intensive area in Brazil to the suicide mortality frequency noted in three reference populations. In addition, hospitalization rates attributed to suicide attempts and mood disorders including depression in residents of the same Agricultural area were compared to two reference populations. Finally, data on pesticide sales per Agricultural worker were obtained for each city of Rio de Janeiro State and suicide mortality risk was then calculated according to the quartiles of pesticide sales per Agricultural Workers, using the first quartile as reference. Agricultural Workers were at greater risk for lethality due to suicide when compared to all three reference populations. In addition, residents of the same study area showed higher hospitalization rates by suicide attempts and mood disorders than observed in comparison populations. Results also showed that the risk of death by suicide was significantly higher among Agricultural Workers who lived in areas of Rio de Janeiro State displaying higher rates of pesticide expenditure per Agricultural worker. These results suggest that pesticide exposure may indeed increase the risk of suicide frequency, especially among Agricultural Workers.

  • cancer mortality among Agricultural Workers from serrana region state of rio de janeiro brazil
    Environmental Research, 2003
    Co-Authors: Armando Meyer, Juliana De Rezende Chrisman, Josino Costa Moreira, Sergio Koifman
    Abstract:

    One of the proposed hypotheses to explain the higher incidence of specific-site cancers among Agricultural Workers is their higher exposure to pesticides. The role of pesticide exposure in morbidity and mortality profiles in Brazil is not well known. Therefore, in order to contribute to increase knowledge on this subject, an ecological analysis aiming to investigate cancer mortality among Agricultural Workers in an important Agricultural area of the Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil, was performed. All causes of death for male Workers 30-69 years old provided by the National Mortality Information System between 1979 and 1998 were evaluated. To estimate cancer mortality risks of selected sites, mortality odds ratio (MOR) was employed, and three reference populations were used. Higher mortality of esophagus, stomach, and larynx cancer in Agricultural Workers 50-69 years old was observed in the period from 1979 to 1988 and of esophagus and stomach cancer from 1989 to 1998. Agricultural Workers 30-49 years old showed higher, but not statistically significant, mortality by stomach, esophagus, liver, testis, and prostate cancer, and soft-tissue sarcoma in the period of 1979-1988, and by testis and penis cancer, leukemia, and soft-tissue sarcoma in the period of 1989-1998. Despite the limitations of ecological approaches concerning causality ascertainment, we believe that this study raises questions of the possible role of pesticide exposure on the cancer mortality profile among Brazilian Agricultural Workers.