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K. V. S. Badarinath – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • soil surface nitrogen losses from agriculture in india a regional inventory within Agroecological Zones 2000 2001
    International Journal of Sustainable Development and World Ecology, 2006
    Co-Authors: Krishna V Prasad, K. V. S. Badarinath

    Abstract:

    We present soil surface nitrogen (N) budgets for the agricultural sector of India, calculated as inputs minus outputs over 21 Agroecological Zones (AEZ), for 2000–2001. Nearly 35.4 Tg N was input from different sources, with output from harvested crops of about 21.2 Tg N. Soil surface N balance for agricultural lands showed a surplus of about 14.4 Tg. Livestock manure constituted 44% of total inputs, followed by 32.5% from inorganic fertilizer, 11.9% from atmospheric deposition and 11.6% from N fixation. Though the N balance was negative in some states, due to aggregation of states in Agroecological regions, all regions showed surplus N loads, with a range of about 19–110 kg/ha. The lowest loads were found for AEZ 17 in the Eastern Himalaya, with 19 kg/ha surplus, and the highest surplus N load in AEZ 7 with 111 kg/ha in Deccan plateau and the Eastern Ghats. Temporal trends in fertilizer consumption from 1950–2000 for India suggested a massive increase of ∼47-fold, whereas production of major crops, rice,…

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  • Soil surface nitrogen losses from agriculture in India: A regional inventory within Agroecological Zones (2000–2001)
    International Journal of Sustainable Development & World Ecology, 2006
    Co-Authors: V. Krishna Prasad, K. V. S. Badarinath

    Abstract:

    We present soil surface nitrogen (N) budgets for the agricultural sector of India, calculated as inputs minus outputs over 21 Agroecological Zones (AEZ), for 2000–2001. Nearly 35.4 Tg N was input from different sources, with output from harvested crops of about 21.2 Tg N. Soil surface N balance for agricultural lands showed a surplus of about 14.4 Tg. Livestock manure constituted 44% of total inputs, followed by 32.5% from inorganic fertilizer, 11.9% from atmospheric deposition and 11.6% from N fixation. Though the N balance was negative in some states, due to aggregation of states in Agroecological regions, all regions showed surplus N loads, with a range of about 19–110 kg/ha. The lowest loads were found for AEZ 17 in the Eastern Himalaya, with 19 kg/ha surplus, and the highest surplus N load in AEZ 7 with 111 kg/ha in Deccan plateau and the Eastern Ghats. Temporal trends in fertilizer consumption from 1950–2000 for India suggested a massive increase of ∼47-fold, whereas production of major crops, rice,…

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Krishna V Prasad – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • soil surface nitrogen losses from agriculture in india a regional inventory within Agroecological Zones 2000 2001
    International Journal of Sustainable Development and World Ecology, 2006
    Co-Authors: Krishna V Prasad, K. V. S. Badarinath

    Abstract:

    We present soil surface nitrogen (N) budgets for the agricultural sector of India, calculated as inputs minus outputs over 21 Agroecological Zones (AEZ), for 2000–2001. Nearly 35.4 Tg N was input from different sources, with output from harvested crops of about 21.2 Tg N. Soil surface N balance for agricultural lands showed a surplus of about 14.4 Tg. Livestock manure constituted 44% of total inputs, followed by 32.5% from inorganic fertilizer, 11.9% from atmospheric deposition and 11.6% from N fixation. Though the N balance was negative in some states, due to aggregation of states in Agroecological regions, all regions showed surplus N loads, with a range of about 19–110 kg/ha. The lowest loads were found for AEZ 17 in the Eastern Himalaya, with 19 kg/ha surplus, and the highest surplus N load in AEZ 7 with 111 kg/ha in Deccan plateau and the Eastern Ghats. Temporal trends in fertilizer consumption from 1950–2000 for India suggested a massive increase of ∼47-fold, whereas production of major crops, rice,…

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Amadou Toure – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Fallow residue management effects on upland rice in three Agroecological Zones of West Africa.
    Biology and Fertility of Soils, 2000
    Co-Authors: René K. Akanvou, Mathias Becker, Moussa Chano, D. E. Johnson, Henri Gbaka-tcheche, Amadou Toure

    Abstract:

    Improving fallow quality in upland rice-fallow rotations in West Africa through the site-specific use of leguminous cover crops has been shown to sustain the productivity of such systems. We studied the effects of a range of residue management practices (removal, burning, mulching and incorporation) on fallow biomass and N accumulation, on weed biomass and yield response of upland rice and on changes in soil physical and chemical characteristics in 2-year field trials conducted in three Agroecological Zones of Cote d’Ivoire. Across fallow management treatments and Agroecological Zones, rice yields were on average 20–30% higher in legume than in natural fallow plots. Weed biomass was highest in the savanna zone and lowest in the bimodal forest and tended to be less following a legume fallow. Regardless of the type of fallow vegetation and Agroecological zone, biomass removal resulted in the lowest rice yields that varied from 0.5 t ha–1 in the derived savanna zone to 1.5 t ha–1 in the Guinea savanna zone. Burning of the fallow vegetation significantly increased yield over residue removal in the derived savanna (0.27 t ha–1, P

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  • fallow residue management effects on upland rice in three Agroecological Zones of west africa
    Biology and Fertility of Soils, 2000
    Co-Authors: René K. Akanvou, Mathias Becker, Moussa Chano, D. E. Johnson, Henri Gbakatcheche, Amadou Toure

    Abstract:

    Improving fallow quality in upland rice-fallow rotations in West Africa through the site-specific use of leguminous cover crops has been shown to sustain the productivity of such systems. We studied the effects of a range of residue management practices (removal, burning, mulching and incorporation) on fallow biomass and N accumulation, on weed biomass and yield response of upland rice and on changes in soil physical and chemical characteristics in 2-year field trials conducted in three Agroecological Zones of Cote d’Ivoire. Across fallow management treatments and Agroecological Zones, rice yields were on average 20–30% higher in legume than in natural fallow plots. Weed biomass was highest in the savanna zone and lowest in the bimodal forest and tended to be less following a legume fallow. Regardless of the type of fallow vegetation and Agroecological zone, biomass removal resulted in the lowest rice yields that varied from 0.5 t ha–1 in the derived savanna zone to 1.5 t ha–1 in the Guinea savanna zone. Burning of the fallow vegetation significantly increased yield over residue removal in the derived savanna (0.27 t ha–1, P<0.05) and bimodal forest Zones (0.27 t ha–1, P<0.01), but not in the Guinea savanna. In both savanna environments, residue incorporation was superior to the farmers' practice of residue removal and rice yield increases were related to amounts of fallow N returned to the soil (r2=0.803, P<0.01). In the forest zone, the farmers' practice of residue burning produced the highest yield (1.43 t ha-1 in the case of legumes) and resulted in the lowest weed biomass (0.02 t ha–1). Regardless of the site, improving the quality of the fallow or of its management had no significant effects on either soil physical or soil chemical characteristics after two fallow cycles. We conclude that incorporation of legume residues is a desirable practice for rice-based fallow rotation systems in savanna environments. No promising residue management alternatives to slash-and-burn were apparent for the forest zone. Determining the possible effects on soil productivity will require longer-term experiments.

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