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Chihyung Huang – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Optimization of Power Management Strategy for Parallel Air-Fuel Hybrid System
    Energy Procedia, 2017
    Co-Authors: Shu-yu Yang, Chengkuo Sung, Chihyung Huang

    Abstract:

    Abstract Air Engines (AE) are commonly designed to work in combination with internal combustion Engines (ICE) due to low energy density. The emission of heat from ICE boosts the efficiency of Air Engines, whereas the high-pressure gas from AE serves as a form of turbo charging for ICE, increasing its efficiency. Unlike batteries, the Air tank that AE requires is not limited by certain restrictions in order to prolong its lifetime, therefore, the Air Hybrid System is believed to have great potential. There has already been quite some research on power management strategy of electric hybrid systems, however, little is done on Air hybrid systems. A numerical models of Air Hybrid Systems is established using MATLAB in this study, the characteristics of the model, such as the efficiency map and driving cycles are further analyzed to obtain the optimal energy management strategy for Air Hybrid Systems. These findings are expected to help the realization of physical models and the establishment of controller design. Through genetic algorithms, the optimal system structures, operation modes and power management strategies are found to ensure that both Engines are operating within the most efficient range. Simulation results suggest that the efficiency of the Air Hybrid System is 26.13% higher comparing to a lone Air Engine.

  • modified intake and exhaust system for piston type compressed Air Engines
    Energy, 2015
    Co-Authors: Chimin Liu, Jhihjie You, Chengkuo Sung, Chihyung Huang

    Abstract:

    This study investigated a modified intake and exhaust system for piston-type compressed Air Engines. A conventional 100-cm3 four-stroke internal combustion engine was modified to a two-stroke compressed Air engine and its output power and fluid properties at various intake pressures and rotational speeds were examined. The torque output, Airflow rate, and cylinder pressure were recorded; these values reflected the fluid characteristics of the compressed Air engine during operation. The conventional engine design uses a cam mechanism for controlling the intake and exhaust valves, wherein the valves open and close gradually. To overcome this drawback, a rotary intake and exhaust system was designed in which the valves open and close quickly. This new system is operable at Air pressures as high as 13 bar, and the operating cylinder pressure rises faster than it does in systems featuring the conventional cam mechanism. Air Engines installed with the new rotary intake and exhaust system yield an output power of 2.15 kW and a torque of 15.97 Nm at 13 bar.

  • the applications of piston type compressed Air Engines on motor vehicles
    Procedia Engineering, 2014
    Co-Authors: Yuanwei Wang, Chengkuo Sung, Jhihjie You, Chihyung Huang

    Abstract:

    Abstract This study presents the applications of piston type compressed Air engine on a small size motor vehicle. A conventional 100cc four-stroke internal combustion engine(IC engine) was modified to a two-stroke compressed Air engine and the power output has been examined with different intake valve timing and supply Air pressures on a test bench. The compressed Air engine was installed on a motorcycle for the demonstration of vehicle application. The success of this application demonstrates the concept of green energy vehicle with zero emission using compressed Air energy. The motorcycle installed with the compressed Air engine can operate at maximum speed around 38.2 km/hr. and distance up to 5 km.

Chengkuo Sung – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Optimization of Power Management Strategy for Parallel Air-Fuel Hybrid System
    Energy Procedia, 2017
    Co-Authors: Shu-yu Yang, Chengkuo Sung, Chihyung Huang

    Abstract:

    Abstract Air Engines (AE) are commonly designed to work in combination with internal combustion Engines (ICE) due to low energy density. The emission of heat from ICE boosts the efficiency of Air Engines, whereas the high-pressure gas from AE serves as a form of turbo charging for ICE, increasing its efficiency. Unlike batteries, the Air tank that AE requires is not limited by certain restrictions in order to prolong its lifetime, therefore, the Air Hybrid System is believed to have great potential. There has already been quite some research on power management strategy of electric hybrid systems, however, little is done on Air hybrid systems. A numerical models of Air Hybrid Systems is established using MATLAB in this study, the characteristics of the model, such as the efficiency map and driving cycles are further analyzed to obtain the optimal energy management strategy for Air Hybrid Systems. These findings are expected to help the realization of physical models and the establishment of controller design. Through genetic algorithms, the optimal system structures, operation modes and power management strategies are found to ensure that both Engines are operating within the most efficient range. Simulation results suggest that the efficiency of the Air Hybrid System is 26.13% higher comparing to a lone Air Engine.

  • modified intake and exhaust system for piston type compressed Air Engines
    Energy, 2015
    Co-Authors: Chimin Liu, Jhihjie You, Chengkuo Sung, Chihyung Huang

    Abstract:

    This study investigated a modified intake and exhaust system for piston-type compressed Air Engines. A conventional 100-cm3 four-stroke internal combustion engine was modified to a two-stroke compressed Air engine and its output power and fluid properties at various intake pressures and rotational speeds were examined. The torque output, Airflow rate, and cylinder pressure were recorded; these values reflected the fluid characteristics of the compressed Air engine during operation. The conventional engine design uses a cam mechanism for controlling the intake and exhaust valves, wherein the valves open and close gradually. To overcome this drawback, a rotary intake and exhaust system was designed in which the valves open and close quickly. This new system is operable at Air pressures as high as 13 bar, and the operating cylinder pressure rises faster than it does in systems featuring the conventional cam mechanism. Air Engines installed with the new rotary intake and exhaust system yield an output power of 2.15 kW and a torque of 15.97 Nm at 13 bar.

  • the applications of piston type compressed Air Engines on motor vehicles
    Procedia Engineering, 2014
    Co-Authors: Yuanwei Wang, Chengkuo Sung, Jhihjie You, Chihyung Huang

    Abstract:

    Abstract This study presents the applications of piston type compressed Air engine on a small size motor vehicle. A conventional 100cc four-stroke internal combustion engine(IC engine) was modified to a two-stroke compressed Air engine and the power output has been examined with different intake valve timing and supply Air pressures on a test bench. The compressed Air engine was installed on a motorcycle for the demonstration of vehicle application. The success of this application demonstrates the concept of green energy vehicle with zero emission using compressed Air energy. The motorcycle installed with the compressed Air engine can operate at maximum speed around 38.2 km/hr. and distance up to 5 km.

Pascal Stouffs – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Study of three valves command laws of the expansion cylinder of a hot Air engine
    International Journal of Thermodynamics, 2019
    Co-Authors: Pascal Stouffs, Max Ndamé Ngangué, Olivier Sosso Mayi

    Abstract:

    The family of hot Air Engines with external heat input is divided in two subgroups: the Stirling Engines, invented in 1816, have no valves whereas Ericsson Engines, invented in 1833, have valves in order to isolate the cylinders. The valves give some advantages to the Ericsson engine. Amongst them, the most important one is that the heat exchangers are not to be considered as unswept dead volumes whereas the Stirling engine designer is faced to the difficult compromise between heat exchanger transfer area maximization and heat exchanger volume minimization. However, the distribution system of the Ericsson engine introduces some complexity and a non-negligible mechanical energy consumption in order to actuate them . An original and very simple system called “bash-valve” is proposed to provide answers to the difficulties related to the distribution system of the Ericsson engine. The “bash-valve” technology has been used in steam piston Engines and pneumatic piston Engines. In this system, the piston itself actuates the opening of the valves when being around the top dead center. When its moves to the bottom dead center, the piston loses contact with the valves and it closes under the effect of the return spring. Three different valves command laws of the expansion cylinder of the proposed hot Air engine are studied. A comparison between energy performance of the engine with the expansion cylinder equipped with two kinds of bash valve technology and the energy performance of the expansion cylinder of an incomplete expansion Joule Ericsson cycle engine is presented as well as their influence on the design of the system.

  • energy exergy and cost analysis of a micro cogeneration system based on an ericsson engine
    International Journal of Thermal Sciences, 2005
    Co-Authors: S Bonnet, M Alaphilippe, Pascal Stouffs

    Abstract:

    Hot Air Engines (Stirling and Ericsson Engines) are well suited for micro-cogeneration applications because they are noiseless, and they require very low maintenance. Ericsson Engines (i.e. Joule cycle reciprocating Engines with external heat supply) are especially interesting because their design is less constrained than Stirling Engines, leading to potentially cheaper and energetically better systems. We study the coupling of such an Ericsson engine with a system of natural gas combustion. In order to design this plant, we carry out classic energy, exergy and exergo-economic analyses. This study does not deal with a purely theoretical thermodynamic cycle. Instead, it is led with a special attempt to describe as accurately as possible what could be the design and the performance of a real engine. It allows us to balance energetic performance and heat exchanger sizes, to plot the exergy Grassmann diagram, and to evaluate the cost of the thermal and electric energy production. These simple analyses confirm the interest of such systems for micro-cogeneration purposes. The main result of this study is thus to draw the attention on Ericsson Engines, unfortunately unfAirly fallen into oblivion.