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Airway Conductance

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James Theodore – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Detection of Small Airway Dysfunction Using Specific Airway Conductance
    Chest, 1997
    Co-Authors: Ali G. Bassiri, Reda E. Girgis, Ramona L. Doyle, James Theodore
    Abstract:

    Study objective To assess the potential utility of specific Airway Conductance (sGaw) in detecting small Airways dysfunction, the postlung-transplant bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) was used as a model of small Airways dysfunction. BOS is defined as an otherwise unexplained 20% reduction in FEV 1 . We hypothesized that if sGaw is sensitive to small Airways dysfunction, it should decrease before the decline in FEV 1 Design/methods The pulmonary function test and sGaw measurements of patients who underwent heart-lung or bilateral lung transplantation between May 1981 and January 1993 were reviewed. Patients with and without BOS were identified. A significant decrease in sGaw was defined as a 20% fall from baseline. Results Twenty-six BOS and 15 non-BOS patients had at least three sGaw measurements such that trends could be examined. Eleven of the 26 BOS patients (42%) had a significant decrease in sGaw before a 20% decrease in FEV 1 , as compared to 2 of the 15 non-BOS patients (13%) (p=0.08). In comparison, 12 of the 26 BOS patients (46%) and 4 of the 15 non-BOS patients (27%) had a significant decrease in forced expiratory flow at 25 to 75% of the forced lung volume (FEF25-75) (p=0.32), an accepted test of small Airways dysfunction. Conclusion sGaw tended to decrease before FEV 1 in BOS. The trend in sGaw was similar to the trend in FEF25-75. We conclude that (1) small Airways may contribute more to Airway Conductance than previously thought, and (2) further prospective studies are warranted to better define the relative contribution of small and large Airways to sGaw.

Ali G. Bassiri – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Detection of Small Airway Dysfunction Using Specific Airway Conductance
    Chest, 1997
    Co-Authors: Ali G. Bassiri, Reda E. Girgis, Ramona L. Doyle, James Theodore
    Abstract:

    Study objective To assess the potential utility of specific Airway Conductance (sGaw) in detecting small Airways dysfunction, the postlung-transplant bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) was used as a model of small Airways dysfunction. BOS is defined as an otherwise unexplained 20% reduction in FEV 1 . We hypothesized that if sGaw is sensitive to small Airways dysfunction, it should decrease before the decline in FEV 1 Design/methods The pulmonary function test and sGaw measurements of patients who underwent heart-lung or bilateral lung transplantation between May 1981 and January 1993 were reviewed. Patients with and without BOS were identified. A significant decrease in sGaw was defined as a 20% fall from baseline. Results Twenty-six BOS and 15 non-BOS patients had at least three sGaw measurements such that trends could be examined. Eleven of the 26 BOS patients (42%) had a significant decrease in sGaw before a 20% decrease in FEV 1 , as compared to 2 of the 15 non-BOS patients (13%) (p=0.08). In comparison, 12 of the 26 BOS patients (46%) and 4 of the 15 non-BOS patients (27%) had a significant decrease in forced expiratory flow at 25 to 75% of the forced lung volume (FEF25-75) (p=0.32), an accepted test of small Airways dysfunction. Conclusion sGaw tended to decrease before FEV 1 in BOS. The trend in sGaw was similar to the trend in FEF25-75. We conclude that (1) small Airways may contribute more to Airway Conductance than previously thought, and (2) further prospective studies are warranted to better define the relative contribution of small and large Airways to sGaw.

Ramona L. Doyle – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Detection of Small Airway Dysfunction Using Specific Airway Conductance
    Chest, 1997
    Co-Authors: Ali G. Bassiri, Reda E. Girgis, Ramona L. Doyle, James Theodore
    Abstract:

    Study objective To assess the potential utility of specific Airway Conductance (sGaw) in detecting small Airways dysfunction, the postlung-transplant bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) was used as a model of small Airways dysfunction. BOS is defined as an otherwise unexplained 20% reduction in FEV 1 . We hypothesized that if sGaw is sensitive to small Airways dysfunction, it should decrease before the decline in FEV 1 Design/methods The pulmonary function test and sGaw measurements of patients who underwent heart-lung or bilateral lung transplantation between May 1981 and January 1993 were reviewed. Patients with and without BOS were identified. A significant decrease in sGaw was defined as a 20% fall from baseline. Results Twenty-six BOS and 15 non-BOS patients had at least three sGaw measurements such that trends could be examined. Eleven of the 26 BOS patients (42%) had a significant decrease in sGaw before a 20% decrease in FEV 1 , as compared to 2 of the 15 non-BOS patients (13%) (p=0.08). In comparison, 12 of the 26 BOS patients (46%) and 4 of the 15 non-BOS patients (27%) had a significant decrease in forced expiratory flow at 25 to 75% of the forced lung volume (FEF25-75) (p=0.32), an accepted test of small Airways dysfunction. Conclusion sGaw tended to decrease before FEV 1 in BOS. The trend in sGaw was similar to the trend in FEF25-75. We conclude that (1) small Airways may contribute more to Airway Conductance than previously thought, and (2) further prospective studies are warranted to better define the relative contribution of small and large Airways to sGaw.

Reda E. Girgis – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Detection of Small Airway Dysfunction Using Specific Airway Conductance
    Chest, 1997
    Co-Authors: Ali G. Bassiri, Reda E. Girgis, Ramona L. Doyle, James Theodore
    Abstract:

    Study objective To assess the potential utility of specific Airway Conductance (sGaw) in detecting small Airways dysfunction, the postlung-transplant bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) was used as a model of small Airways dysfunction. BOS is defined as an otherwise unexplained 20% reduction in FEV 1 . We hypothesized that if sGaw is sensitive to small Airways dysfunction, it should decrease before the decline in FEV 1 Design/methods The pulmonary function test and sGaw measurements of patients who underwent heart-lung or bilateral lung transplantation between May 1981 and January 1993 were reviewed. Patients with and without BOS were identified. A significant decrease in sGaw was defined as a 20% fall from baseline. Results Twenty-six BOS and 15 non-BOS patients had at least three sGaw measurements such that trends could be examined. Eleven of the 26 BOS patients (42%) had a significant decrease in sGaw before a 20% decrease in FEV 1 , as compared to 2 of the 15 non-BOS patients (13%) (p=0.08). In comparison, 12 of the 26 BOS patients (46%) and 4 of the 15 non-BOS patients (27%) had a significant decrease in forced expiratory flow at 25 to 75% of the forced lung volume (FEF25-75) (p=0.32), an accepted test of small Airways dysfunction. Conclusion sGaw tended to decrease before FEV 1 in BOS. The trend in sGaw was similar to the trend in FEF25-75. We conclude that (1) small Airways may contribute more to Airway Conductance than previously thought, and (2) further prospective studies are warranted to better define the relative contribution of small and large Airways to sGaw.

Mika J. Mäkelä – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Budesonide improves decreased Airway Conductance in infants with respiratory symptoms
    Archives of disease in childhood, 2009
    Co-Authors: Anna S. Pelkonen, Kristiina Malmström, Leo Pekka Malmberg, Seppo Sarna, Markku Turpeinen, Merja Kajosaari, Tari Haahtela, Mika J. Mäkelä
    Abstract:

    Objective: Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) are commonly used to treat wheezing disorders in children, but few studies have investigated the effect of ICS on lung function in infants. We evaluated the efficacy of inhaled budesonide for decreased specific Airway Conductance (sGaw) as an indication of bronchial obstruction in very young children with recurrent cough and/or wheeze. Patients, design and interventions: Functional residual capacity (FRC) and sGaw of steroid-naive children aged 3–26 months with respiratory symptoms were measured using an infant whole-body plethysmograph. Clinically indicated bronchoscopy was performed in 79% of the patients to exclude anatomical abnormalities before randomisation. Children with abnormal lung function and respiratory symptoms were randomised into two treatment groups, receiving either inhaled budesonide (400 μg/day) or placebo with NebuChamber for 6 weeks. Inhaled terbutaline 0.25 mg/dose was used as a rescue medication. Lung function measurements were repeated after 6 weeks. Main outcome measure: Lung function. Results: 44 children with a median age of 11.3 months (range 3.7–25.9) completed the study. Median sGaw improved from a z score of −3.6 to −1.2 (p Conclusion: Treatment with inhaled budesonide for 6 weeks improved sGaw in young children with chronic cough or wheeze and bronchial obstruction.