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Dedra Buchwald – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • obesity risk factors in american indians and Alaska Natives a systematic review
    Public Health, 2019
    Co-Authors: Anna Zamorakapoor, Lonnie A Nelson, K Sinclair, H Lee, Dedra Buchwald

    Abstract:

    Abstract Objectives We systematically reviewed the literature on risk factors for obesity in American Indians (AIs) and Alaska Natives (ANs) of all ages. Study design We searched titles and abstracts in PubMed with combinations of the following terms: obesity, body mass index (BMI), American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native American. Methods We limited our review to articles that provided an empirically testable claim about a variable associated with obesity, measured obesity as a dependent variable, and provided data specific to AI/ANs. Results Our final sample included 31 articles; 20 examined AI/AN youth ( Conclusions Extant studies have three limitations: they do not apply a life course perspective, they lack nationally representative data and have limited knowledge of the resilience, resistance and resourcefulness of AI/ANs. Future studies that avoid these shortcomings are needed to inform interventions to reduce the prevalence of obesity in AI/ANs across the life course.

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  • barriers to cancer care among american indians and Alaska Natives
    Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved, 2016
    Co-Authors: Craig N Sawchuk, Jack Goldberg, Emily Van Dyke, Adam Omidpanah, Joan Russo, Ursula Tsosie, Dedra Buchwald

    Abstract:

    Introduction . Cancer is among the leading causes of death in American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/ANs), with rates increasing over the last two decades. Barriers in accessing cancer screening and treatment likely contribute to this situation. Methods . We administered structured clinical interviews and conducted descriptive and multiple linear regression analyses of demographic, health, spiritual, and treatment factors associated with self-reported barriers to cancer care among 143 adult AI/AN oncology patients. Results . High levels of satisfaction with cancer care, older age, positive mental health quality of life, and positive physical health quality of life were all significantly associated with lower scores for cancer care barriers, explaining 27% of the total model variance. Conclusion . Addressing barriers to cancer care might help to reduce health disparities among AI/AN oncology patients. Future research should determine whether reducing barriers improves engagement with cancer treatment and overall health outcomes.

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  • prostate cancer screening among american indians and Alaska Natives the health and retirement survey 1996 2008
    Preventing Chronic Disease, 2015
    Co-Authors: Turner R Goins, Carolyn Noonan, Marc B Schure, Dedra Buchwald

    Abstract:

    INTRODUCTION Among US men, prostate cancer is the leading malignancy diagnosed and the second leading cause of cancer death. Disparities in cancer screening rates exist between American Indians/Alaska Natives and other racial/ethnic groups. Our study objectives were to examine prostate screening at 5 time points over a 12-year period among American Indian/Alaska Native men aged 50 to 75 years, and to compare their screening rates to African American men and white men in the same age group. METHODS We analyzed Health and Retirement Study data for 1996, 1998, 2000, 2004, and 2008. Prostate screening was measured by self-report of receipt of a prostate examination within the previous 2 years. Age-adjusted prevalence was estimated for each year. We used regression with generalized estimating equations to compare prostate screening prevalence by year and race. RESULTS Our analytic sample included 119 American Indian/Alaska Native men (n = 333 observations), 1,359 African American men (n = 3,704 observations), and 8,226 white men (n = 24,292 observations). From 1996 to 2008, prostate screening rates changed for each group: from 57.0% to 55.7% among American Indians/Alaska Natives, from 62.0% to 71.2% among African Americans, and from 68.6% to 71.3% among whites. Although the disparity between whites and African Americans shrank over time, it was virtually unchanged between whites and American Indians/Alaska Natives. CONCLUSION As of 2008, American Indians/Alaska Natives were less likely than African Americans and whites to report a prostate examination within the previous 2 years. Prevalence trends indicated a modest increase in prostate cancer screening among African Americans and whites, while rates remained substantially lower for American Indians/Alaska Natives.

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Spero M. Manson – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • posttraumatic stress disorder and symptoms among american indians and Alaska Natives a review of the literature
    Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, 2014
    Co-Authors: Deborah R Bassett, Dedra Buchwald, Spero M. Manson

    Abstract:

    Purpose
    American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/ANs) experience high rates of trauma and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). We reviewed existing literature to address three interrelated questions: (1) What is the prevalence of PTSD and PTSD symptoms among AI/ANs? (2) What are the inciting events, risk factors, and co-morbidities in AI/ANs, and do they differ from those in the general U.S. population? (3) Are studies available to inform clinicians about the course and treatment of PTSD in this population?

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  • American Indians/Alaska Natives and dementia.
    Alzheimer Disease & Associated Disorders, 2002
    Co-Authors: Lori L. Jervis, Spero M. Manson

    Abstract:

    Summary:Although the Native elder population continues to expand, very little is known about how dementia of any kind affects this group. This article reviews what is and is not known about dementia among American Indians/Alaska Natives. Specifically, it examines prevalence, assessment and diagnosis

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  • mental health services for american indians and Alaska Natives need use and barriers to effective care
    The Canadian Journal of Psychiatry, 2000
    Co-Authors: Spero M. Manson

    Abstract:

    This special review summarizes and illustrates the state of our knowledge regarding the mental health needs of American Indians and Alaska Natives. These needs are considerable and pervasive. The d…

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Paul Spicer – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • use of the evidence base in substance abuse treatment programs for american indians and Alaska Natives pursuing quality in the crucible of practice and policy
    Implementation Science, 2011
    Co-Authors: Douglas K Novins, Gregory A Aarons, Sarah G Conti, Dennis Dahlke, Raymond Daw, Alexandra Fickenscher, Candace Fleming, Craig T Love, Kathleen Masis, Paul Spicer

    Abstract:

    A variety of forces are now shaping a passionate debate regarding the optimal approaches to improving the quality of substance abuse services for American Indian and Alaska Native communities. While there have been some highly successful efforts to meld the traditions of American Indian and Alaska Native tribes with that of 12-step approaches, some American Indian and Alaska Natives remain profoundly uncomfortable with the dominance of this Euro-American approach to substance abuse treatment in their communities. This longstanding tension has now been complicated by the emergence of a number of evidence-based treatments that, while holding promise for improving treatment for American Indian and Alaska Natives with substance use problems, may conflict with both American Indian and Alaska Native and 12-step healing traditions. We convened a panel of experts from American Indian and Alaska Native communities, substance abuse treatment programs serving these communities, and researchers to discuss and analyze these controversies in preparation for a national study of American Indian and Alaska Native substance abuse services. While the panel identified programs that are using evidence-based treatments, members still voiced concerns about the cultural appropriateness of many evidence-based treatments as well as the lack of guidance on how to adapt them for use with American Indians and Alaska Natives. The panel concluded that the efforts of federal and state policymakers to promote the use of evidence-based treatments are further complicating an already-contentious debate within American Indian and Alaska Native communities on how to provide effective substance abuse services. This external pressure to utilize evidence-based treatments is particularly problematic given American Indian and Alaska Native communities’ concerns about protecting their sovereign status. Broadening this conversation beyond its primary focus on the use of evidence-based treatments to other salient issues such as building the necessary research evidence (including incorporating American Indian and Alaska Native cultural values into clinical practice) and developing the human and infrastructural resources to support the use of this evidence may be far more effective for advancing efforts to improve substance abuse services for American Indian and Alaska Native communities.

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  • attitudes of urban american indians and Alaska Natives regarding participation in research
    Journal of General Internal Medicine, 2006
    Co-Authors: Dedra Buchwald, Veronica Mendozajenkins, Calvin D Croy, Helen Mcgough, Marjorie Bezdek, Paul Spicer

    Abstract:

    OBJECTIVE: To determine what factors influence participation in health research among American Indians and Alaska Natives.

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