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Dan Binkley – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • soil phosphorus pools and supply under the influence of eucalyptus saligna and nitrogen fixing Albizia facaltaria
    Forest Ecology and Management, 2000
    Co-Authors: Dan Binkley, Chistian Giardina, Michael A Bashkin

    Abstract:

    Replicated plantations of Eucalyptus saligna (Sm.) and Albizia falcataria (L.) Fosberg were examined for patterns in soil phosphorus (P) fractions and soil P availability. The supply of P was assessed in the field with anion exchange resin bags, which indicated that P supply was about twice as high under Eucalyptus as under Albizia. In the laboratory, solution P extracted with iron oxide-impregnated paper strips was also 45% higher under Eucalyptus. The effects of mixtures of the two species were intermediate between the pure-species effects. Overall, P supply either increased with Eucalyptus or decreased under Albizia. Despite significantly lower soil P availability, the Albizia plots appeared to take up and cycle as much P as the Eucalyptus plots, indicating that P supply was not independent of P demand. High rates of P uptake by Albizia may depend on higher allocations of carbohydrate to belowground production.

  • Net primary production and nutrient cycling in replicated stands of Eucalyptus saligna and Albizia facaltaria
    Forest Ecology and Management, 1998
    Co-Authors: Dan Binkley, Michael G. Ryan

    Abstract:

    Production and nutrient cycling budgets were estimated at three locations within 1 km on the island of Hawaii, for replicated plantations of Eucalyptus saligna Sm. and nitrogen-fixing Albizia facaltaria (L.) Fosberg (aParaserianthes facaltaria (L.) Nielson)). At the age of 16 years, the aboveground biomass of Eucalyptus averaged 323 Mg/ha, about 50% more than the 216 Mg/ha of Albizia biomass. Net primary production (NPP) was about 40 Mg ha ˇ1 year ˇ1 for both species. Eucalyptus allocated 45% of NPP to stem production, compared with 34% of Albizia (pa0.02). Conversely, Eucalyptus allocated less production belowground (29% of NPP) than did Albizia (41% of NPP, p

  • net primary production and nutrient cycling in replicated stands of eucalyptus saligna and Albizia facaltaria
    Forest Ecology and Management, 1998
    Co-Authors: Dan Binkley, Michael G. Ryan

    Abstract:

    Production and nutrient cycling budgets were estimated at three locations within 1 km on the island of Hawaii, for replicated plantations of Eucalyptus saligna Sm. and nitrogen-fixing Albizia facaltaria (L.) Fosberg (aParaserianthes facaltaria (L.) Nielson)). At the age of 16 years, the aboveground biomass of Eucalyptus averaged 323 Mg/ha, about 50% more than the 216 Mg/ha of Albizia biomass. Net primary production (NPP) was about 40 Mg ha ˇ1 year ˇ1 for both species. Eucalyptus allocated 45% of NPP to stem production, compared with 34% of Albizia (pa0.02). Conversely, Eucalyptus allocated less production belowground (29% of NPP) than did Albizia (41% of NPP, p<0.01). Litterfall mass did not differ between species, but differences in litterfall nutrient concentrations led to greater litterfall cycling of N and P for Albizia than for Eucalyptus (141 vs. 105 kg N ha ˇ1 ; 6.2 vs. 4.8 kg P ha ˇ1 year ˇ1 ). The rate of N cycling in the aboveground-increment plus litterfall did not differ significantly between species. Lower soil P supply under Albizia may be partially responsible for the high ratio of belowground:aboveground production for Albizia. The mean annual increment (MAI) of aboveground biomass of Eucalyptus for 16 years was 20.2 Mg ha ˇ1 year ˇ1 , which is not different from the annual increment of 19.3 Mg ha ˇ1 year ˇ1 between the age of 14 and 16 years. The MAI for Albizia (13.5 Mg ha ˇ1 year ˇ1 ) also matched the annual increment (13.9 Mg ha ˇ1 year ˇ1 ) from ages 14‐16. The sustained high productivity of these stands may warrant longer rotation periods than currently recommended, especially on fertile soils or in silvicultural systems with high rates of fertilization. # 1998 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

Wen Xin Chen – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • mesorhizobium Albiziae sp nov a novel bacterium that nodulates Albizia kalkora in a subtropical region of china
    International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology, 2007
    Co-Authors: Feng-qin Wang, En Tao Wang, Qiang Chen, Wen-feng Chen, Wen Xin Chen

    Abstract:

    A novel Mesorhizobium group associated with Albizia kalkora [ Wang et al. (2006) , Syst Appl Microbiol 29, 502–517] was further characterized. The seven strains in this group showed similar protein patterns and were different from defined Mesorhizobium species in SDS-PAGE of whole-cell proteins. The representative strain CCBAU 61158T formed a novel Mesorhizobium lineage in phylogenetic analyses of 16S rRNA, atpD, glnII and nifH genes. However, its nodC gene sequence was more similar to that of Rhizobium gallicum R602spT than to those of Mesorhizobium species. DNA–DNA relatedness between CCBAU 61158T and reference strains of defined Mesorhizobium species was lower than 34.1 %. These results indicated that this Mesorhizobium group was a unique genomic species. The subtropical distribution, host origin, PCR-RFLP patterns of 16S rRNA genes, fatty acid profile and a series of phenotypic characteristics could be used as distinctive features of this group. This group is therefore proposed as a novel species, Mesorhizobium Albiziae sp. nov., with CCBAU 61158T (=LMG 23507T=USDA 4964T) as the type strain. Strain CCBAU 61158T could form effective nodules on Albizia julibrissin, Glycine max, Leucaena leucocephala and Phaseolus vulgaris.

  • characterization of rhizobia isolated from Albizia spp in comparison with microsymbionts of acacia spp and leucaena leucocephala grown in china
    Systematic and Applied Microbiology, 2006
    Co-Authors: Feng-qin Wang, En Tao Wang, Yongfa Zhang, Wen Xin Chen

    Abstract:

    This is the first systematic study of rhizobia associated with Albizia trees. The analyses of PCR-RFLP and sequencing of 16S rRNA genes, SDS–PAGE of whole-cell proteins and clustering of phenotypic characters grouped the 31 rhizobial strains isolated from Albizia into eight putative species within the genera Bradyrhizobium, Mesorhizobium and Rhizobium. Among these eight rhizobial species, five were unique to Albizia and the remaining three were shared with Acacia and Leucaena, two legume trees coexisting with Albizia in China. These results indicated that Albizia species nodulate with a wide range of rhizobial species and had preference of microsymbionts different from Acacia and Leucaena. The definition of four novel groups, Mesorhizobium sp., Rhizobium sp. I, Rhizobium sp. II and “R. giardinii”, indicates that further studies with enlarged rhizobial population are necessary to better understand the diversity and to clarify the taxonomic relationships of Albizia-associated rhizobia.

Feng-qin Wang – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • mesorhizobium Albiziae sp nov a novel bacterium that nodulates Albizia kalkora in a subtropical region of china
    International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology, 2007
    Co-Authors: Feng-qin Wang, En Tao Wang, Qiang Chen, Wen-feng Chen, Wen Xin Chen

    Abstract:

    A novel Mesorhizobium group associated with Albizia kalkora [ Wang et al. (2006) , Syst Appl Microbiol 29, 502–517] was further characterized. The seven strains in this group showed similar protein patterns and were different from defined Mesorhizobium species in SDS-PAGE of whole-cell proteins. The representative strain CCBAU 61158T formed a novel Mesorhizobium lineage in phylogenetic analyses of 16S rRNA, atpD, glnII and nifH genes. However, its nodC gene sequence was more similar to that of Rhizobium gallicum R602spT than to those of Mesorhizobium species. DNA–DNA relatedness between CCBAU 61158T and reference strains of defined Mesorhizobium species was lower than 34.1 %. These results indicated that this Mesorhizobium group was a unique genomic species. The subtropical distribution, host origin, PCR-RFLP patterns of 16S rRNA genes, fatty acid profile and a series of phenotypic characteristics could be used as distinctive features of this group. This group is therefore proposed as a novel species, Mesorhizobium Albiziae sp. nov., with CCBAU 61158T (=LMG 23507T=USDA 4964T) as the type strain. Strain CCBAU 61158T could form effective nodules on Albizia julibrissin, Glycine max, Leucaena leucocephala and Phaseolus vulgaris.

  • characterization of rhizobia isolated from Albizia spp in comparison with microsymbionts of acacia spp and leucaena leucocephala grown in china
    Systematic and Applied Microbiology, 2006
    Co-Authors: Feng-qin Wang, En Tao Wang, Yongfa Zhang, Wen Xin Chen

    Abstract:

    This is the first systematic study of rhizobia associated with Albizia trees. The analyses of PCR-RFLP and sequencing of 16S rRNA genes, SDS–PAGE of whole-cell proteins and clustering of phenotypic characters grouped the 31 rhizobial strains isolated from Albizia into eight putative species within the genera Bradyrhizobium, Mesorhizobium and Rhizobium. Among these eight rhizobial species, five were unique to Albizia and the remaining three were shared with Acacia and Leucaena, two legume trees coexisting with Albizia in China. These results indicated that Albizia species nodulate with a wide range of rhizobial species and had preference of microsymbionts different from Acacia and Leucaena. The definition of four novel groups, Mesorhizobium sp., Rhizobium sp. I, Rhizobium sp. II and “R. giardinii”, indicates that further studies with enlarged rhizobial population are necessary to better understand the diversity and to clarify the taxonomic relationships of Albizia-associated rhizobia.