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Ann Roche – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • What works in school-based Alcohol Education: A systematic review:
    Health Education Journal, 2016
    Co-Authors: Nicole K. Lee, Jacqueline Cameron, Samantha Battams, Ann Roche
    Abstract:

    Background:Considerable attention has been focused on the impact of young people’s Alcohol use. To address this, schools often implement Alcohol and drug Education and there are many potential programmes to choose from.Objective:The aim of this study was to identify evidence-based Alcohol Education programmes for schools.Methods:A systematic review was undertaken of school-based programmes that targeted Alcohol within a school setting and included at least one Alcohol behaviour or knowledge change outcome. Six-hundred seventy-five abstracts were screened resulting in 454 studies assessed for eligibility, with 70 studies, evaluating 40 individual programmes, included in the final review.Results:Of the 40 programmes, 3 had good evidence of a positive effect. They included CLIMATE Schools (Australia), Project ALERT (USA) and All Stars (USA). Of the others, 4 showed some evidence of positive effect, 1 had no evidence of effect, 29 were inconclusive and 2 showed negative outcomes, such as increases in Alcohol

  • Alcohol Education: what really works?
    , 2014
    Co-Authors: Ann Roche, Nicole Lee, Jacqui Cameron
    Abstract:

    A major systematic review of research on Alcohol Education programs in schools was undertaken by the National Centre for Education and Training on Addiction (NCETA) at Flinders University, Australia. If you are looking to introduce or revise Alcohol Education in your school, this information booklet will help you choose a program that has been found to be effective.

  • Audience-response devices (‘clickers’): A discussion paper on their potential contribution to Alcohol Education in schools
    Health Education Journal, 2012
    Co-Authors: Clarissa Hughes, Ann Roche, Petra Teresia Bywood, Allan Trifonoff
    Abstract:

    Many schools endeavour to provide effective, relevant and appealing Alcohol Education to students, using up-to-date technologies and resources. However, choosing an appropriate, evidence-based program or approach is rarely straightforward given the plethora of options and limited evidence base. The Alcohol Education literature and findings from a recent Australian study indicate four key features of effective Alcohol Education approaches � interactivity, peer Education, exploration of students� opinions/knowledge, and addressing Alcohol-related misperceptions. These four features are acknowledged strengths of audience response devices (�clickers�). Clickers are increasingly popular, supported by growing evidence of suitability for a variety of Educational application and have untapped potential in the delivery of Alcohol Education. Clickers can engage and empower students and their ability to elucidate misperceptions regarding prevalence and acceptance of risky Alcohol use among peers corresponds with normative Education approaches. Clickers are effective, fun, create valuable �teachable moments� and provide potential to enhance delivery of evidence-based Alcohol Education.

Steve Baldwin – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Alcohol Education courses for offenders: On the road to nowhere?
    The Journal of Forensic Psychiatry, 1994
    Co-Authors: Steve Baldwin
    Abstract:

    Abstract Since 1982, Alcohol Education courses and programmes (AECs/ AEPs) have been developed in many local services, to meet the needs of offenders with drink problems. Such services have been established both in government (e.g. probation/social work) and non-govcrnment (e.g. Council on Alcohol) settings. Despite the recent increase in AEC provision in the UK, however, this has occurred in the absence of data about effectiveness to support such developments. Moreover, examination of programme contents of many AECs has reflected outdated and outmoded ideas about ‘Alcohol Education’ (i.e. information provision to change behaviour). Exploration of practitioner behaviour, among ‘Alcohol educators’ who work with offenders, suggests that such service provision may be based on Zeitgeist rather than on data. A shift to more elegant and robust intervention models is proposed.

  • A pilot study of an Alcohol Education course for young women offenders: what’s good for the goose?
    Alcohol and alcoholism (Oxford Oxfordshire), 1993
    Co-Authors: Jane Macmillan, Steve Baldwin
    Abstract:

    Although the provision of Alcohol Education Courses (AECs) for male offenders has increased steadily in the last 10 years, treatment interventions for women have continued to be neglected and under-researched. An Alcohol Education Course designed for women offenders was piloted in a prison. This report outlines the content of the course and the rationale for its development. Facilitatory and oppositional factors experienced in conducting work in this setting are discussed. Application of this work is limited to female offenders aged 17-24 with drink-related offending. This pilot study awaits replication in non-institutional settings.

  • Alcohol Education Courses (AECs) as a Court Disposal: A Preliminary Examination of Effectiveness
    Alcoholism Treatment Quarterly, 1991
    Co-Authors: M.k. Ward, Steve Baldwin
    Abstract:

    This study sets out to examine the effectiveness of Alcohol Education as a Court Disposal. The Forfar Alcohol Education Course was initiated as an attempt to educate young people with regard to their maladaptive drinking behaviour. The course aimed to reduce students’ Alcohol consumption and reduce their offending behaviour. This was introduced as an alternative to normal sentencing policy.

Betsy Thom – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Good practice in school based Alcohol Education programmes.
    Patient Education and Counseling, 2017
    Co-Authors: Betsy Thom
    Abstract:

    Abstract Objective To identify elements of good practice in designing and delivering Alcohol Education programmes in schools. Methods Literature reviews and published programme evaluations were used to identify key elements of good practice. Results Principles of good practive are identified and discussed. Five main issues are highlighted: choosing a universal or targetted approach, the need for theoretical frameworks, adopting a stand-alone or multi-component approach; issues of delivery and programme fidelity, and balancing programme fidelity and cultural relevance. Conclusions Programme objectives, programme fidelity and cultural context are important factors in designing programmes and will influence outcomes and evaluation of success. Practice implications In developing Alcohol Education programmes, there is a need to draw on the evidence and experience accrued from previous efforts. Programme development and implementation can draw on results from evaluated programmes to design Alcohol Education programmes suited to specific contexts, the availability of resources, the perceived needs of the target group and the problem to be addressed.

  • Good practice in school based Alcohol Education programmes.
    Patient education and counseling, 2015
    Co-Authors: Betsy Thom
    Abstract:

    To identify elements of good practice in designing and delivering Alcohol Education programmes in schools. Literature reviews and published programme evaluations were used to identify key elements of good practice. Principles of good practive are identified and discussed. Five main issues are highlighted: choosing a universal or targetted approach, the need for theoretical frameworks, adopting a stand-alone or multi-component approach; issues of delivery and programme fidelity, and balancing programme fidelity and cultural relevance. Programme objectives, programme fidelity and cultural context are important factors in designing programmes and will influence outcomes and evaluation of success. In developing Alcohol Education programmes, there is a need to draw on the evidence and experience accrued from previous efforts. Programme development and implementation can draw on results from evaluated programmes to design Alcohol Education programmes suited to specific contexts, the availability of resources, the perceived needs of the target group and the problem to be addressed. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

John B. Saunders – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Interactional skills of students from traditional and non-traditional medical schools before and after Alcohol Education.
    Medical education, 2001
    Co-Authors: Raoul A. Walsh, Ann Roche, Rob Sanson-fisher, John B. Saunders
    Abstract:

    Objective To compare Alcohol-related intervention and general interactional skills performance of medical students from a traditional (Sydney) and a non-traditional (Newcastle) medical school, before and after participation in an Alcohol Education programme about brief intervention. Design In two controlled trials, students received either a didactic Alcohol Education programme or didactic input plus skills-based training. Prior to and after training, all students completed videotaped interviews with simulated patients. Setting The Faculties of Medicine at the University of Newcastle and the University of Sydney, Australia. Subjects Fifth-year medical students (n=154). Results Both Alcohol-related intervention and general interactional skills scores of the Newcastle students were significantly higher than those of the Sydney students at pre-test but not after training. Although Alcohol-related interactional skills scores improved after training at both universities, they did not reach a satisfactory level. The Educational approach used had no effect on post-test scores at either university. Conclusions Significant baseline differences in interactional skills scores favouring non-traditional over traditional students were no longer evident after both groups had been involved in an Alcohol Education programme. Further research is required to develop more effective Alcohol intervention training methods.

Reiner Hanewinkel – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • school based Alcohol Education results of a cluster randomized controlled trial
    Addiction, 2009
    Co-Authors: Matthis Morgenstern, Gudrun Wiborg, Barbara Isensee, Reiner Hanewinkel
    Abstract:

    OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to examine the effects of a school-based Alcohol Education intervention. DESIGN: Two-arm three-wave cluster-randomized controlled trial, with schools as the unit for randomization. Surveys were conducted prior to intervention implementation, then 4 and 12 months after baseline. SETTING: A total of 30 public schools in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany. Participants Baseline data were obtained from 1686 7th graders. The retention rate was 85% over 12 months. Intervention The intervention consisted of four interactive lessons conducted by teachers, booklets for students and booklets for parents. MEASURES: Knowledge, attitudes, life-time Alcohol consumption (ever use Alcohol without parental knowledge, ever been drunk and ever binge drinking) and past-month Alcohol use. RESULTS: Intention-to-treat analyses revealed that intervention status was associated with more general knowledge about Alcohol and lower levels of life-time binge drinking. No effects were found with respect to students’ self-reported attitudes, intentions to drink, life-time Alcohol use and past-month Alcohol use. CONCLUSIONS: The results indicate that this brief school-based intervention had a small short-term preventive effect on Alcohol misuse. Language: en