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Alexander Technique

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Isbn – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Alexander Technique Workbook
    , 2004
    Co-Authors: Isbn

    Abstract:

    Alexander Technique Workbook, Ziele, Adressen, Mitglied in, Aktionen, Kontakt, Studio fur F.M. Alexander – Technik in Frankfurt am Main, Lernen, Lehren, Voraussetzungen, Lektionen, Seminare, Veranstaltungen, Unterricht, Preise, Erfolge, F.M. Alexander, Definition, Kommentare, Grundbegriffe, Literatur, Prominete, Aktion, Glossar, Themen, Gesundheit am Arbeitsplatz, Augen, Kooperationen, Golf, Musik, Medizin, Yoga, Wellness, Presse, Fachliteratur, Tageszeitungen, Periodika, Internet, Manuskripte, Fragen, Wer macht, Wem hilft, Wer braucht, Was ist, Warum, Wozu, Welche Krankheiten, Zahlt Krankenkassen, Wie erklart

  • Guided Lessons for Students of the Alexander Technique
    , 2004
    Co-Authors: Isbn

    Abstract:

    Guided Lessons for Students of the Alexander Technique, Ziele, Adressen, Mitglied in, Aktionen, Kontakt, Studio fur F.M. Alexander – Technik in Frankfurt am Main, Lernen, Lehren, Voraussetzungen, Lektionen, Seminare, Veranstaltungen, Unterricht, Preise, Erfolge, F.M. Alexander, Definition, Kommentare, Grundbegriffe, Literatur, Prominete, Aktion, Glossar, Themen, Gesundheit am Arbeitsplatz, Augen, Kooperationen, Golf, Musik, Medizin, Yoga, Wellness, Presse, Fachliteratur, Tageszeitungen, Periodika, Internet, Manuskripte, Fragen, Wer macht, Wem hilft, Wer braucht, Was ist, Warum, Wozu, Welche Krankheiten, Zahlt Krankenkassen, Wie erklart

  • Back Trouble: A New Approach to Prevention and Recovery Based on the Alexander Technique
    , 2004
    Co-Authors: Back Trouble: A New Approach To Prevention, Isbn

    Abstract:

    Back Trouble: A New Approach to Prevention and Recovery Based on the Alexander Technique, Ziele, Adressen, Mitglied in, Aktionen, Kontakt, Studio fur F.M. Alexander – Technik in Frankfurt am Main, Lernen, Lehren, Voraussetzungen, Lektionen, Seminare, Veranstaltungen, Unterricht, Preise, Erfolge, F.M. Alexander, Definition, Kommentare, Grundbegriffe, Literatur, Prominete, Aktion, Glossar, Themen, Gesundheit am Arbeitsplatz, Augen, Kooperationen, Golf, Musik, Medizin, Yoga, Wellness, Presse, Fachliteratur, Tageszeitungen, Periodika, Internet, Manuskripte, Fragen, Wer macht, Wem hilft, Wer braucht, Was ist, Warum, Wozu, Welche Krankheiten, Zahlt Krankenkassen, Wie erklart

Paul Little – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Alexander Technique and Supervised Physiotherapy Exercises in back paiN (ASPEN): a four-group randomised feasibility trial
    Efficacy and Mechanism Evaluation, 2014
    Co-Authors: Paul Little, George Lewith, Beth Stuart, Maria Stokes, Carolyn Nicholls, Lisa Roberts, Stephen J. Preece, Tim Cacciatore, Simon Brown, Adam W.a. Geraghty

    Abstract:

    Background: The Alexander Technique probably helps back pain but it is unclear whether or not it can be combined with physiotherapy exercise classes, how many lessons are needed and what mechanisms might be involved.

    Objectives: To undertake a feasibility trial of the Alexander Technique and supervised exercise classes and perform exploratory biomechanical and neuromuscular physiological marker analyses to better understand mediators of recovery.

    Design: Feasibility parallel-group randomised controlled trial.

    Setting: General practices in southern England.
    Participants: Patients with recurrent back pain (at least 3 weeks’ duration of a current episode).

    Interventions: Participants were allocated by an external randomisation line to four groups: (1) normal care, (2) 10 Alexander Technique lessons, (3) 12 physiotherapy exercise classes, (4) Alexander Technique lessons plus exercise classes.

    Main outcome measures: The feasibility outcomes were recruitment, acceptability and follow-up. The clinical outcomes were the Roland–Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ), days in pain, the Von Korff pain and disability scale, overall improvement, fear of activity, enablement, the Oswestry Disability Index and the Aberdeen pain and function scale. Laboratory-based markers were axial muscle tone and flexibility, electrical activity, muscle tone and mechanical properties of elasticity and stiffness, trunk strength, and proprioception.

    Results: In total, 83 patients consented, 69 were randomised and 56 (81%) were followed up at 6 months. Most patients had long-standing pain (median >300 days of pain). The RMDQ and other instruments were sensitive to change and the preliminary evidence suggests that the Aberdeen scale could be a useful measure. Study procedures were feasible and three methods of recruitment were successfully piloted. At 6 months the control group had changed little (RMDQ 1 point lower than at baseline) and, compared with the control group, clinically important improvements in RMDQ were seen in all groups, albeit not significant [Alexander Technique −3.0, 95% confidence interval (CI) −6.7 to 0.8]; exercise classes −2.9, 95% CI −6.5 to 0.8; combined Alexander Technique + exercise classes −2.50, 9% CI −6.20 to 1.19]. Novel biomechanical variables strongly associated with RMDQ score at 6 months were muscle tone (0.94 increase in RMDQ per unit increase in Hz, 95% CI 0.48 to 1.40; p < 0.0001), lumbar proprioception (1.48 increase in RMDQ per degree, 95% CI 0.83 to 2.12; p < 0.0001) and muscle elasticity (−4.86 increase in RMDQ per unit log decrement, 95% CI −0.01 to −9.72; p < 0.05). At 3 months the Alexander Technique improved proprioception and exercise classes improved trunk extension strength. At 6 months the Alexander Technique improved the timing of multifidus muscle onset and the active straight leg raise test and exercise classes improved multifidus muscle thickness and the ability to contract. The combined effects of the Alexander Technique and exercise classes were improvements in muscle tone, elasticity and thickness and contractile ability. These observations provide possible links between intervention, proprioception, muscle tone and elasticity and outcome. In terms of harms, one patient fell in the exercise class group.

    Conclusions: The trial is feasible and the interventions may provide clinically important benefits. Exploratory analysis suggests that muscle tone, elasticity and proprioception are strongly associated with improved RMDQ score and are likely to be modified by the interventions.

  • Participating in and delivering the ATEAM trial (Alexander Technique lessons, exercise, and massage) interventions for chronic back pain: A qualitative study of professional perspectives.
    Complementary therapies in medicine, 2010
    Co-Authors: Angela Beattie, Paul Little, Lucy Yardley, Alison Shaw, Debbie Sharp

    Abstract:

    To outline professionals’ experiences of participation, perceived benefits and acceptability of the interventions delivered in the ATEAM trial (Alexander Technique lessons, exercise, and massage), for patients with chronic or recurrent back pain.
    Qualitative study using in-depth interviews was conducted with a purposeful sample of twenty professionals (general practitioners (GPs), nurses, Alexander Technique teachers, and massage therapists). Data were recorded, transcribed, and analysed thematically using the constant comparison method.
    Evidence of effectiveness GPs wanted an evidence base for the interventions, whilst nurses, Alexander Technique teachers and massage therapists perceived patient reports of benefit as evidence. Professionals’ perception of the acceptability of the intervention: professional perspectives differed, with GPs and nurses viewing the structured nature of exercise prescription and Alexander Technique lessons as more beneficial and acceptable than massage in alleviating patients’ back pain. Economic cost: the cost to patients pursuing Alexander Technique lessons and massage was perceived to be a barrier outside the trial. Inter-professional communication: there was little communication between the professionals groups within the trial.
    Valuable insights have been gained into the perceived benefits and acceptability of exercise, Alexander Technique lessons and massage as interventions for chronic back pain. Lessons in the Alexander Technique with or without exercise, was perceived as more beneficial and acceptable than massage by professionals who participated and delivered the ATEAM trial interventions.
    Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • Participating in and delivering the ATEAM trial (Alexander Technique lessons, exercise, and massage) interventions for chronic back pain: A qualitative study of professional perspectives.
    Complementary Therapies in Medicine, 2010
    Co-Authors: Angela Beattie, Paul Little, Lucy Yardley, Alison Shaw, Deborah Sharp

    Abstract:

    Objectives: To outline professionals’ experiences of participation, perceived benefits and acceptability of the interventions delivered in the ATEAM trial (Alexander Technique lessons, exercise, and massage), for patients with chronic or recurrent back pain. Design: Qualitative study using in-depth interviews was conducted with a purposeful sample of twenty professionals (general practitioners (GPs), nurses, Alexander Technique teachers, and massage therapists). Data were recorded, transcribed, and analysed thematically using the constant comparison method. Results: Evidence of effectiveness GPs wanted an evidence base for the interventions, whilst nurses, Alexander Technique teachers and massage therapists perceived patient reports of benefit as evidence. Professionals’ perception of the acceptability of the intervention: professional perspectives differed, with GPs and nurses viewing the structured nature of exercise prescription and Alexander Technique lessons as more beneficial and acceptable than massage in alleviating patients’ back pain. Economic cost: the cost to patients pursuing Alexander Technique lessons and massage was perceived to be a barrier outside the trial. Inter-professional communication: there was little communication between the professionals groups within the trial. Conclusions: Valuable insights have been gained into the perceived benefits and acceptability of exercise, Alexander Technique lessons and massage as interventions for chronic back pain. Lessons in the Alexander Technique with or without exercise, was perceived as more beneficial and acceptable than massage by professionals who participated and delivered the ATEAM trial interventions. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

Angela Beattie – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Participating in and delivering the ATEAM trial (Alexander Technique lessons, exercise, and massage) interventions for chronic back pain: A qualitative study of professional perspectives.
    Complementary therapies in medicine, 2010
    Co-Authors: Angela Beattie, Paul Little, Lucy Yardley, Alison Shaw, Debbie Sharp

    Abstract:

    To outline professionals’ experiences of participation, perceived benefits and acceptability of the interventions delivered in the ATEAM trial (Alexander Technique lessons, exercise, and massage), for patients with chronic or recurrent back pain.
    Qualitative study using in-depth interviews was conducted with a purposeful sample of twenty professionals (general practitioners (GPs), nurses, Alexander Technique teachers, and massage therapists). Data were recorded, transcribed, and analysed thematically using the constant comparison method.
    Evidence of effectiveness GPs wanted an evidence base for the interventions, whilst nurses, Alexander Technique teachers and massage therapists perceived patient reports of benefit as evidence. Professionals’ perception of the acceptability of the intervention: professional perspectives differed, with GPs and nurses viewing the structured nature of exercise prescription and Alexander Technique lessons as more beneficial and acceptable than massage in alleviating patients’ back pain. Economic cost: the cost to patients pursuing Alexander Technique lessons and massage was perceived to be a barrier outside the trial. Inter-professional communication: there was little communication between the professionals groups within the trial.
    Valuable insights have been gained into the perceived benefits and acceptability of exercise, Alexander Technique lessons and massage as interventions for chronic back pain. Lessons in the Alexander Technique with or without exercise, was perceived as more beneficial and acceptable than massage by professionals who participated and delivered the ATEAM trial interventions.
    Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • Participating in and delivering the ATEAM trial (Alexander Technique lessons, exercise, and massage) interventions for chronic back pain: A qualitative study of professional perspectives.
    Complementary Therapies in Medicine, 2010
    Co-Authors: Angela Beattie, Paul Little, Lucy Yardley, Alison Shaw, Deborah Sharp

    Abstract:

    Objectives: To outline professionals’ experiences of participation, perceived benefits and acceptability of the interventions delivered in the ATEAM trial (Alexander Technique lessons, exercise, and massage), for patients with chronic or recurrent back pain. Design: Qualitative study using in-depth interviews was conducted with a purposeful sample of twenty professionals (general practitioners (GPs), nurses, Alexander Technique teachers, and massage therapists). Data were recorded, transcribed, and analysed thematically using the constant comparison method. Results: Evidence of effectiveness GPs wanted an evidence base for the interventions, whilst nurses, Alexander Technique teachers and massage therapists perceived patient reports of benefit as evidence. Professionals’ perception of the acceptability of the intervention: professional perspectives differed, with GPs and nurses viewing the structured nature of exercise prescription and Alexander Technique lessons as more beneficial and acceptable than massage in alleviating patients’ back pain. Economic cost: the cost to patients pursuing Alexander Technique lessons and massage was perceived to be a barrier outside the trial. Inter-professional communication: there was little communication between the professionals groups within the trial. Conclusions: Valuable insights have been gained into the perceived benefits and acceptability of exercise, Alexander Technique lessons and massage as interventions for chronic back pain. Lessons in the Alexander Technique with or without exercise, was perceived as more beneficial and acceptable than massage by professionals who participated and delivered the ATEAM trial interventions. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  • Patients’ views of receiving lessons in the Alexander Technique and an exercise prescription for managing back pain in the ATEAM trial.
    Family Practice, 2009
    Co-Authors: Lucy Yardley, Fran Webley, Jane Barnett, Angela Beattie, Maggie Evans, Karen Middleton, Pete Smith, Laura Dennison, Rebecca Coker, Paul Little

    Abstract:

    Methods. A questionnaire assessing attitudes to the intervention, based on the Theory of Planned Behaviour, was completed at baseline and 3-month follow-up by 183 people assigned to lessons in the Alexander Technique and 176 people assigned to exercise prescription. Semi-structured interviews to assess the beliefs contributing to attitudes to the intervention were carried out at baseline with14 people assigned to the lessons in the Alexander Technique and 16 to exercise prescription, and at follow-up with 15 members of the baseline sample. Results. Questionnaire responses indicated that attitudes to both interventions were positive at baseline but became more positive at follow-up only in those assigned to lessons in the Alexander Technique. Thematic analysis of the interviews suggested that at follow-up many patients who had learned the Alexander Technique felt they could manage back pain better. Whereas many obstacles to exercising were reported, few barriers to learning the Alexander Technique were described, since it ‘made sense’, could be practiced while carrying out everyday activities or relaxing, and the teachers provided personal advice and support. Conclusion. Using the Alexander Technique was viewed as effective by most patients. Acceptability may have been superior to exercise because of a convincing rationale and social support and a better perceived fit with the patient’s particular symptoms and lifestyle.