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Alexia without Agraphia

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José Biller – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • right brain a reading specialist with Alexia without Agraphia teacher interrupted
    Neurology, 2014
    Co-Authors: Jason Cuomo, Murray Flaster, José Biller
    Abstract:

    Reading to children was a source of fulfillment in the life of M.P., a 40-year-old aunt, kindergarten teacher, and reading specialist. Whether in the classroom, the reading room, or the living room, M.P. found joy in the dual role of teacher and storyteller. For her, it was an important means of relating to those under her care. But all of that changed when, on a Thursday morning, M.P. found herself standing at the front of her class and holding in her hands an indecipherable mystery.

  • teacher interrupted telling the story of a reading specialist with Alexia without Agraphia p06 076
    Neurology, 2013
    Co-Authors: Jason Cuomo, Murray Flaster, José Biller
    Abstract:

    OBJECTIVE: To provide a descriptive account of a 39-year-old schoolteacher and reading specialist9s experience of living with Alexia without Agraphia following multiple ischemic injuries to the left occipital and parietal cortices, as well as the inferior outflow fibers of the splenium of the corpus callosum, and to familiarize clinicians with subsequent adaptations to this illness. BACKGROUND: Alexia without Agraphia is a rare, acquired neurological syndrome that results from damage to the corpus callosum fibers connecting the parieto-occipital regions of the two hemispheres. This loss of the reading capacity reflects injury to the pathways conveying visual input from both hemispheres to the dominant angular gyrus. DESIGN/METHODS: We give a narrative account of the onset of Alexia without Agraphia in a 39-year-old schoolteacher, emphasizing her new limitations, her adaptations to them, and her unique perspective of the disorder as a former reading specialist at a local elementary school. RESULTS: MP became aware of her illness when she experienced cognitive slowing and personality changes associated with multiple ischemic strokes due to biopsy negative primary CNS angiitis. MP9s major deficits were Alexia without Agraphia, right homonymous hemihemianopsia, color anomia, and mild visual object agnosia. Specifically, she had persistent difficulties with visual word and letter comprehension, while tactile pathways to letter recognition remained intact. MP is currently progressing well toward the goal of reading 3-4 simple paragraphs with good comprehension thanks to crafting her own compensatory techniques emphasizing the use of tactile letter-naming and letter-by-letter reading. CONCLUSIONS: As the prognosis for patients with Alexia without Agraphia is widely variable, an understanding of the patient9s experience of these impairments is critical for prompt diagnosis and the timely development of appropriate rehabilitation strategies. Disclosure: Dr. Cuomo has nothing to disclose. Dr. Flaster has nothing to disclose. Dr. Biller has received personal compensation in an editorial capacity for the Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases, and Frontiers in Neurology.

Jason Cuomo – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • right brain a reading specialist with Alexia without Agraphia teacher interrupted
    Neurology, 2014
    Co-Authors: Jason Cuomo, Murray Flaster, José Biller
    Abstract:

    Reading to children was a source of fulfillment in the life of M.P., a 40-year-old aunt, kindergarten teacher, and reading specialist. Whether in the classroom, the reading room, or the living room, M.P. found joy in the dual role of teacher and storyteller. For her, it was an important means of relating to those under her care. But all of that changed when, on a Thursday morning, M.P. found herself standing at the front of her class and holding in her hands an indecipherable mystery.

  • teacher interrupted telling the story of a reading specialist with Alexia without Agraphia p06 076
    Neurology, 2013
    Co-Authors: Jason Cuomo, Murray Flaster, José Biller
    Abstract:

    OBJECTIVE: To provide a descriptive account of a 39-year-old schoolteacher and reading specialist9s experience of living with Alexia without Agraphia following multiple ischemic injuries to the left occipital and parietal cortices, as well as the inferior outflow fibers of the splenium of the corpus callosum, and to familiarize clinicians with subsequent adaptations to this illness. BACKGROUND: Alexia without Agraphia is a rare, acquired neurological syndrome that results from damage to the corpus callosum fibers connecting the parieto-occipital regions of the two hemispheres. This loss of the reading capacity reflects injury to the pathways conveying visual input from both hemispheres to the dominant angular gyrus. DESIGN/METHODS: We give a narrative account of the onset of Alexia without Agraphia in a 39-year-old schoolteacher, emphasizing her new limitations, her adaptations to them, and her unique perspective of the disorder as a former reading specialist at a local elementary school. RESULTS: MP became aware of her illness when she experienced cognitive slowing and personality changes associated with multiple ischemic strokes due to biopsy negative primary CNS angiitis. MP9s major deficits were Alexia without Agraphia, right homonymous hemianopsia, color anomia, and mild visual object agnosia. Specifically, she had persistent difficulties with visual word and letter comprehension, while tactile pathways to letter recognition remained intact. MP is currently progressing well toward the goal of reading 3-4 simple paragraphs with good comprehension thanks to crafting her own compensatory techniques emphasizing the use of tactile letter-naming and letter-by-letter reading. CONCLUSIONS: As the prognosis for patients with Alexia without Agraphia is widely variable, an understanding of the patient9s experience of these impairments is critical for prompt diagnosis and the timely development of appropriate rehabilitation strategies. Disclosure: Dr. Cuomo has nothing to disclose. Dr. Flaster has nothing to disclose. Dr. Biller has received personal compensation in an editorial capacity for the Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases, and Frontiers in Neurology.

Murray Flaster – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • right brain a reading specialist with Alexia without Agraphia teacher interrupted
    Neurology, 2014
    Co-Authors: Jason Cuomo, Murray Flaster, José Biller
    Abstract:

    Reading to children was a source of fulfillment in the life of M.P., a 40-year-old aunt, kindergarten teacher, and reading specialist. Whether in the classroom, the reading room, or the living room, M.P. found joy in the dual role of teacher and storyteller. For her, it was an important means of relating to those under her care. But all of that changed when, on a Thursday morning, M.P. found herself standing at the front of her class and holding in her hands an indecipherable mystery.

  • teacher interrupted telling the story of a reading specialist with Alexia without Agraphia p06 076
    Neurology, 2013
    Co-Authors: Jason Cuomo, Murray Flaster, José Biller
    Abstract:

    OBJECTIVE: To provide a descriptive account of a 39-year-old schoolteacher and reading specialist9s experience of living with Alexia without Agraphia following multiple ischemic injuries to the left occipital and parietal cortices, as well as the inferior outflow fibers of the splenium of the corpus callosum, and to familiarize clinicians with subsequent adaptations to this illness. BACKGROUND: Alexia without Agraphia is a rare, acquired neurological syndrome that results from damage to the corpus callosum fibers connecting the parieto-occipital regions of the two hemispheres. This loss of the reading capacity reflects injury to the pathways conveying visual input from both hemispheres to the dominant angular gyrus. DESIGN/METHODS: We give a narrative account of the onset of Alexia without Agraphia in a 39-year-old schoolteacher, emphasizing her new limitations, her adaptations to them, and her unique perspective of the disorder as a former reading specialist at a local elementary school. RESULTS: MP became aware of her illness when she experienced cognitive slowing and personality changes associated with multiple ischemic strokes due to biopsy negative primary CNS angiitis. MP9s major deficits were Alexia without Agraphia, right homonymous hemianopsia, color anomia, and mild visual object agnosia. Specifically, she had persistent difficulties with visual word and letter comprehension, while tactile pathways to letter recognition remained intact. MP is currently progressing well toward the goal of reading 3-4 simple paragraphs with good comprehension thanks to crafting her own compensatory techniques emphasizing the use of tactile letter-naming and letter-by-letter reading. CONCLUSIONS: As the prognosis for patients with Alexia without Agraphia is widely variable, an understanding of the patient9s experience of these impairments is critical for prompt diagnosis and the timely development of appropriate rehabilitation strategies. Disclosure: Dr. Cuomo has nothing to disclose. Dr. Flaster has nothing to disclose. Dr. Biller has received personal compensation in an editorial capacity for the Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases, and Frontiers in Neurology.

Benjamin H. Eidelman – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • An Unusual Case of Acquired Alexia without Agraphia Caused by Perioperative Stroke (P4.368)
    Neurology, 2016
    Co-Authors: Ugur Sener, Jason Siegel, Benjamin H. Eidelman
    Abstract:

    Objective: We aim to describe an unusual case of Alexia without Agraphia with a review of perioperative stroke literature. Background: Alexia without Agraphia is a disconnection syndrome between the visual cortices and the dominant perisylvian language area. The lesion typically involves the dominant occipital lobe, the splenium of the corpus callosum, and the dominant fusiform gyrugyrus which decodes the written message. In-hospital strokes account for 4[percnt] to 17[percnt] of all acute strokes, and compared to community-onset strokes, they have significantly longer wait times from symptom onset to recognition, neuroimaging, and thrombolysis, and have an overall lower rate of receiving thrombolysis. Perioperative strokes account for a significant proportion of these in-hospital events. Methods: This is a case report and review of literature. The literature search includes epidemiology, risk factors, and treatment options for perioperative stroke. Results: We present a case of Alexia without Agraphia without the typical hemianopia and caused by an infarct sparing the corpus callosum. The stroke was attributed to a perioperative cerebral ischemic event, most likely from endovascular irritation of his atherosclerotic aortic arch during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Rather than one lesion in one vascular territory, this patient experienced bilateral embolic events each causing small infarcts and the disconnection syndrome. Stroke of any kind is a feared complication of surgical or interventional procedures. Fortunately they are rare, occurring in

  • an unusual case of acquired Alexia without Agraphia caused by perioperative stroke p4 368
    Neurology, 2016
    Co-Authors: Ugur Sener, Jason Siegel, Benjamin H. Eidelman
    Abstract:

    Objective: We aim to describe an unusual case of Alexia without Agraphia with a review of perioperative stroke literature. Background: Alexia without Agraphia is a disconnection syndrome between the visual cortices and the dominant perisylvian language area. The lesion typically involves the dominant occipital lobe, the splenium of the corpus callosum, and the dominant fusiform gyrugyrus which decodes the written message. In-hospital strokes account for 4[percnt] to 17[percnt] of all acute strokes, and compared to community-onset strokes, they have significantly longer wait times from symptom onset to recognition, neuroimaging, and thrombolysis, and have an overall lower rate of receiving thrombolysis. Perioperative strokes account for a significant proportion of these in-hospital events. Methods: This is a case report and review of literature. The literature search includes epidemiology, risk factors, and treatment options for perioperative stroke. Results: We present a case of Alexia without Agraphia without the typical hemianopia and caused by an infarct sparing the corpus callosum. The stroke was attributed to a perioperative cerebral ischemic event, most likely from endovascular irritation of his atherosclerotic aortic arch during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Rather than one lesion in one vascular territory, this patient experienced bilateral embolic events each causing small infarcts and the disconnection syndrome. Stroke of any kind is a feared complication of surgical or interventional procedures. Fortunately they are rare, occurring in <1[percnt] to about 10[percnt] of peri-surgical patients, including 0.6[percnt] of PCI in acute coronary syndrome. Conclusions: Though rare, perioperative strokes occur and are often unidentified. Proceduralists and anesthesiologists should not delay emergent neurological assessment for fear of treatment futility. Though many postoperative patients are not candidates for intravenous thrombolysis, endovascular catheter-based interventions can be considered. Disclosure: Dr. Sener has nothing to disclose. Dr. Siegel has nothing to disclose. Dr. Eidelman has nothing to disclose.

Rhonda B. Friedman – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Mechanisms of reading and spelling in a case of Alexia without Agraphia.
    Neuropsychologia, 2002
    Co-Authors: Rhonda B. Friedman
    Abstract:

    In the clinical syndrome of Alexia without Agraphia, reading is greatly disturbed while writing and spelling remain relatively intact. The most commonly accepted explanation of this pattern of findings is that the center for written language interpretation remains intact, but has become inaccessible to visual input. This paper examines the nature of the intact written language center with respect to specific mechanisms of reading and spelling in a patient presenting with the major components of Alexia without Agraphia. It is concluded that the dissociation between reading and writing performance found in this patient reflects the existence of separate and distinct mechanisms for reading and spelling.